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What works of art define our age? The New York Times asks artists and critics an impossible question
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Iris Murdoch has fallen out of fashion, but her work is worth retrieving as a moral philosophy with a steely-eyed suspicion of intellectual confidence
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We flinch in the face of the Bible's misery and violence, chauvinism and misogyny, idealism and generosity, forgiveness and humaneness
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Bob Dylan fans can be insufferable obsessives. They possess a surfeit of trivia and a dearth of understanding. What about Dylan scholars?
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While big books remind us of how hard the work of understanding can be. Aphorisms offer "a micro-model of empirical inquiry"
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Defense of the hipster. The mid-2000s aesthetic is much loathed, but its critics miss a crucial point: even superficial movements matter
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Arson, self-mutilation, vandalism, perhaps even terrorism — Pyotr Pavlensky’s guerrilla art has landed him in jail. If that won’t stop him, what will?
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Jenny Odell’s defense of empathy, attention, and doing nothing contains much that is true and little that is fresh
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Walking has long been an essential literary act. But why do advocates of a good stretch of the legs have to be so damn smug about it?
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Gore Vidal dedicated Myra Breckinridge to Christopher Isherwood, who called it a “very subtle psychological self-portrait.” He was more right than he knew
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