Loading...

Follow UQ Urban Planning | Shaping a better world on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The article entitled “Contextual and external factors enabling planning
innovations in a regeneration context: the Lyon Confluence project (France)” has just been published in International Planning Studies. Read the full article.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In Spain, economic disparities between regions have traditionally played a relevant role in migration. Nevertheless, during the previous high-instability period, analyses provided conflicting results about the effect of these variables. In this work, we aim to determine the role that labour market factors play in internal migration during the Great Recession, paying special attention to the migration response of the heterogeneous population groups. To do so, we resort to an extended gravity model and we consider as a territorial unit the 45 Spanish Functional Urban Areas. Our results point to real wages as having a significant influence on migration motivations.

  • Title: What Drives Migration Moves across Urban Areas in Spain? Evidence from the Great Recession
  • When: Thursday, 27 June 2019 12:00pm–1:00pm
  • Where: Room 518/519, Chamberlain Building (#35)
  • Speaker: Vicente Royuela is Professor of Applied Economics at the University of Barcelona. He works in the area of regional science and urban economics. He is currently involved in a number of research programs in Spain and Italy funded by the EU Horizon 2020 and the OECD ps. He is the editor of Investigaciones Regionales / Journal of Regional Research and Associate Editor of Regional Science Policy and Practice. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the AQR Research Grup and member of the European Organizing Committee of ERSA.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The fifth paper in the series is out! This is a Special Issue which consists of the ANZAPS2019 Book of Abstracts. ANZAPS is the annual conference of the Australia and New Zealand Association of Planning Schools. In 2019, the Conference was jointly hosted by The University of Queensland and Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia.

Title: Special Issue: ANZAPS2019 Book of Abstracts

Authors: ANZAPS2019 Organizing and Scientific Committee & Conference Participants

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Free speech is critical to urban planning research and practice, as this profession is predicated on the ability to conduct open public debate and participation.

The article below originally appeared in The Conversation, 7 June 2019.

“Because we are so saturated in American culture, very few Australians realise that free speech in this country isn’t really a thing. It is not merely not protected – it’s far worse than that. If you read any of the vast array of laws that protect government secrets, disclosure in the public interest is discouraged, criminalised, punished, and deplored.

The closest we have ever come to having any positive protection of free speech is a series of High Court decisions which say that our Constitution creates an “implied freedom” to communicate so we can be informed citizens. But it is weak. It can be cancelled out by any law that is reasonable and proportionate to achieve another government objective. Former High Court judge Michael Kirby put it bluntly on the ABC yesterday: Australia has less protection of free speech than most Western countries.

Journalists have cared about this sorry state of affairs for a long time, but their pleas have been dismissed as mere self-interest. Yes, journalists are often victims of laws that protect secrecy and target whistleblowers. But what we want, and what everyone should want, is a healthy system of government that can serve the public interest by bringing important matters to light.

The journalist and academic Denis Muller expresses the anger felt by many when he writes that Australian Federal Police, in conducting raids on the ABC and the home of News Limited journalist Annika Smethurst, have allowed themselves to become a tool of “secretive, ruthless and vindictive executive government”. Michelle Grattan writes that Prime Minister Scott Morrison, a keen defender of freedom when it comes to religion, is now faced with the perception that Australia is hostile to a free press.

Meanwhile, Peter Greste, now a Professor of Journalism at the University of Queensland, has long been advocating for greater media freedom as part of a group called the Alliance for Journalists’ Freedom. In May they put out a paper suggesting we should create a law that enshrines media freedom as a positive aspect of our democratic system. Such a law would improve the balance between press freedom and national security, as well as provide a measure of protection from future legislative incursion. (Disclosure: I was part of a round table discussion during which this idea was developed.)

It’s an idea that warrants serious consideration. It’s not a First Amendment, but it could take what many of us already imagine to be the case and turn it into reality.”

By Misha Ketchell

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Matters asked some experts to comment on the scientific accuracy of popular sci-fi narratives. Black Mirror, in particular, has turned casual prophesying of technological dystopia into a mainstream cultural phenomenon. But this ever-present sense of looming dystopia is not always based on a clear or detailed picture of our world. Matters asked a few experts to choose a work of speculative fiction and write about how it relates to their area of research.

Read Dorina’s full interview in Matters Journal.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Courtney Herron death highlights broader issue faced by women, expert says | 7News 31 May 2019

North Lakes golf club plan facing rough times | Courier Mail 31 May 2019

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

While a substantial amount of study of informal settlements has been undertaken, they remain largely unstudied in terms of urban form. The purpose of this article is to set forth a conceptual framework, which considers the context in which informality takes place, the settlement itself, the houses contained therein, the dwellers of those houses and the process through which a settlement is designed and transformed over time. This framework aims to be sufficiently flexible to be deployed across diverse national settings. Its formulation is important because informal settlements are a permanent fixture of the global urban landscape, and are increasing in scale. Any sustainable strategies to improve informal settlements depend on a better understanding of their urban space, as well as of the producers of this space – the residents themselves. Finally, professional designers may be able to learn from this contemporary urban vernacular grammar – perhaps the only one left in the era of sanitized, contrived and prosaic urban design.

Title: The self-built city: theorizing urban design of informal settlements

Journal: Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research

Author: Dorina Pojani

Link: www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ARCH-11-2018-0004#

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

About 100 students from our Introduction to Planning course, taught by Laurel Johnson, went on their first fieltrip around South Brisbane. They visited important local landmarks, including:

Common Ground Building, a social housing project which provides 146 units for a 50/50 mix of low-income and formerly homeless people and also offers support services on site.

Musgrave Park, a contested public open space area which is the subject of a native title claim and an important site for Aboriginal people.

Wheel of Brisbane and South Bank Parklands, a global ‘brand’ for the city and a cultural destination.

Elephant Sculpture at the Gallery of Modern Art, a bronze sculpture of the elephant and the water rat (kuril), which represents cultures coming together.

Kurilpa Bridge, an active transport bridge, which has been judged the world’s best transport project at the World Architectural Awards in Barcelona (2011).

UQ|UP staff and tutors accompanied the students on the tour and/or gave mini-presentations at each site.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These awards recognise excellence in planning studies, and are a chance for teachers, friends, and families to celebrate and reward outstanding performers.

The Awards for Planning Excellence 2019 was hosted by Wendy Evans, PIA Queensland President, and attended by Hon. Cameron Dick, MP, Minister for State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning, who also presented the awards to students.

UQ|UP staff offer many congratulations to:

  • Ms Wei Huang, BRTP Best 1st year performance
  • Ms Helise Ho, BRTP Best 2nd year performance
  • Ms Jacinta Keulemans, BRTP Best 3rd year performance
  • Ms Olivia Nesbitt, BRTP Best overall performance
  • Ms Mechelle Thomson, MURP Best overall performance
  • Ms Catherine Sayer, PIA Student Bursary ($500)
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Government of Malaysia and Humanitarian Affairs Asia is looking for 10 Outstanding Student Leaders to attend the 10th University Scholars Leadership Symposium 2019 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from August 1 to 7.

Student Leaders are sought with the following qualities:

  • Passionate about social change.
  • Active global citizens.
  • Well-versed in current affairs and appreciate cultural diversity.

The 10th USLS will be the largest gathering of like-minded Young Leaders from more than 100 countries. The electrifying atmosphere at the USLS will ignite your passion for humanity, drive you to step out of your comfort zone, and set your heart on greater causes beyond self-preservation. It will challenge you to live a life as a servant leader with passion, persistence, patience and purpose. More importantly, it will kindle the flame of humanity deep within you.

For more information about this unique global opportunity and the registration fee, please send your enquiries to the Global Partnership Associate, Mr. Alexi Heazle atalexi.heazle@humanitarianaffairs.org or visit the website at www.universityscholars.org.uk. To apply, please send an updated CV and recent ID photo to the above email.

A short video documentary of the 9th University Scholars Leadership Symposium, held in the United Nations Conference Centre in Bangkok last year, is available for viewing through the following link (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=parlOvytPas).

Students who apply by the priority deadline will receive best consideration for admission to the 10th USLS.

Priority Deadline ends on June 20th, 2019

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview