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Swedish sustainable menswear brand ASKET thinks that men shouldn’t have to compromise on their foundational wardrobe anymore. Seeing an opportunity to step away from fashion’s frenetic seasons while still creating items that people will love, ASKET has a permanent collection of timeless garments that are high quality and thoughtfully-made.

“My co-founder Jakob and I found that brands changed their style and fit every season, so finding the same t-shirt or oxford again was hard,” says August Bard-Brigéus, “We were finding unnecessary details, tasteless colours, overpaying for ‘quality,’ or paying too little for garments of dubious origin.”

 
Essentials like button-down shirts, chinos, and sweaters are the cornerstone of every wardrobe, and to be able to consistently find the same fit – the one you always find yourself reaching for – makes life easier. ASKET’s garments are focused on correct sizing, garment care as ways to ensure your clothes last season after season.

“Often as consumers, size is where we compromise,” says August, “which is why we created our sizing system. “On top of the traditional XS – XL, it allows customers to choose if they want short, regular, or long versions of every single piece – not just trousers – so that you can find the clothes that fit not just your general ‘size,’ but your actual body.”

“We’re three years in so we’re small, but will eventually build up our collection,” August says, when I ask why their pieces only go up to XL. ASKET ships all over the world, with their largest markets in Scandinavia and Germany, with the USA catching up. “We wanted to start out on an international scale because we think what we’re making is relevant for people all over the world; it’s not just about local markets,” August explains.

 

ASKET’S core message is transparent production. For ASKET, “transparency” is not a buzzword. Each item comes with a full transparency report and offer a percentage for how much of a product’s journey is traceable. This takes into account where the raw materials were farmed to the factories where the clothes are produced. ASKET has made it a goal to have full traceability across their entire collection by the end of 2019.

“When we started the business, we were looking around at the fashion industry and there was just so much work to do,” says August. “A lot of brands were starting to use ‘sustainability’ and ‘ethical’ as these kind of bandwagon words, and we didn’t want to do that. We want to make real changes in our industry by showing people that there’s another way.”

And they’ve done that, in more ways than one. Not only have ASKET proven that it’s possible to be close to fully transparent, their minimalist designs are long-lasting, so you’ll buy less over time. And the catalyst for consumers is that the prices are really reasonable. The brand makes it easy to see how reasonable with a comparison feature on their webshop that indicates the traditional retail value of the item. For example, they sell their Oxford Shirt for 650 DKK, but similar items typically sell for 1,000 DKK.

While ASKET currently only produces menswear, the clothes are basics, so they can be worn by anyone. “We know women buy our clothes too, ” August says, “but actually developing clothes as womenswear comes with another set of requirements for sizing, fit, and so on. So we’re happy for everyone to wear our clothes, but we do eventually want to create more specific pieces for women. That’s a long-term future plan, not something we’re doing now,” he says.

ASKET might be just starting out, but their vision is big. Rather than greenwashing and using vague keywords as a way to comfort their customers, the brand is making tangible change in what is possible for a clothing retailer. If they can do it, other brands can too; now let’s watch them grow.

Find out more about ASKET.

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There are seven Danish UNESCO World Heritage sites, a classification which puts a location in the ranks of globally renown places such as the Great Wall of China, the Pyramids in Egypt, and Iguazu Waterfalls in Brazil. These sites are selected according to their geographical, cultural, and historical relevance within society and to humankind, including natural areas, old ruins, and conserved buildings.

Visiting the UNESCO sites in Denmark is fairly easy, as all are accessible by train or bus

These are the important UNESCO sites in Denmark you should know about: Christiansfeld

Christiansfeld has been a UNESCO site heritage since 2015. It is a small village located within Kolding municipality with approximately 2,885 residents. The village was found in the 18th century by the Moravian Church and named after the King Christian VII who financially supported the village’s construction.


 

The preserved architecture and layout of the village are a treat for history and design-lovers alike. The German influence can be found in the central Moravian church from 1800s, the cemetery, the hall, and at the cultural centre.

Christiansfeld is known for its delicious honey gingerbread (honningkager). To taste the original recipe, be sure to stop by their local bakery, called Honningkagehuset.
 


 

Christiansfeld

6070 Christiansfeld

Honningkagehuset
Haderslevvej 21
6070 Christiansfeld

 
 

Store Dyrhave, Gribskov, and Jægersborg Hegn

The hunting landscape is where Danish kings and the royal families practiced hunting as a sport, and as a way to enforce political power, between 17th and 18th centuries. The forest of Store Dyrhave, Gribskov, and Jægersborg Hegn became lush hunting scenery. A system of grids, numbers, and lodges were designed to accommodate the activities within those three parks, all UNESCO heritage sites since 2015.


 

Today, these areas are used for recreational events and are open to the public. It is possible to have long walks, picnics, and see deer running freely.

Within Dyrhave sits the oldest amusement park in Europe, Bakken, The Hermitage, the king’s hunting lodge, is also open for visitors to tour its grand interior. This verdant forest is full of quiet wonder and is a great place to take the family for a day of outdoor fun.


 

Store Dyrhave, Gribskov, and Jægersborg Hegn

Dyrehaven
2930 Klampenborg

 
 

Stevns Klint

Stevns Klint are chalk cliffs along 17km of the southeast coast of Zealand; it has been a UNESCO heritage site since 2014, along with the Wadden Sea.

The white cliffs are an unique part of Denmark. They are important archeologically as they make up one of the best exposed Cretaceous-Tertiary boundaries in the world. In the thick layer of Fiskeler (Fish Clay), it is possible to see feossils from animals which lived in the area more than 65 millions years ago. The layers can also be seen in Stevnsfortet, an underground cold-war fortress built in 1953.


 

It is possible to walk down the cliffs and stroll along the shore, where you can hunt for fossils and take a cool dip in the ocean.

The famous Møns Klint and Faxe Kalk are both located close to Stevns Klint, and are certainly worth a visit! We also recommend Hoejerup Old Church, Stevns Lighthouse, and Stevns Nature Center.


 

Stevns Klint

Højerup Bygade 39
4660 Store Heddinge

 
 

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Michelin star restaurants in Sweden aren’t hard to come by, and Stockholm is the city with the higest concentration of them. Awarded on a scale of one to three every year by the Guide Michelin, Michelin stars represent excellent food, service, and consistency.

While there is only one three-star restaurant in Stockholm (Frantzén), there are two two-star spots and seven one-star restaurants, for a city total of ten. There are 13 Michelin star restaurants, with either one or two stars, spotted around the rest of Sweden.

While many of the celebrated restaurants in Stockholm focus on New Nordic cuisine, there are other kitchens on offer, including sushi at Sushi Sho and wood-fired meats at Ekstedt. If you’re looking for an unforgettable dining experience in Sweden’s captial, those places with a Michelin star (or two or three) are a good place to start.

These are the Michelin star restaurants to know in Stockholm: Oaxen Krog

Oaxen Krog, along with it’s sister bistro Oaxen Slip, is nestled in the beautiful Djurgården, right on the water. The building, which was designed by architects Mats Fahlander and Agneta Pettersson, is nearly as big a draw as the food; huge glass panes let in light and showcase the waterfront.

Krog is a New Nordic restaurant with a focus on seafood. The menu is always seasonal and local, with a focus on ethical agriculture and animal-rearing. They have a fantastic wine list that highlights smaller vineyards across Europe.

After your meal, ask if you can take a look around Prince van Orängien, the converted Dutch riverboat docked by the restaurant that now serves as a super-small (and chic!) hotel.

Oaxen Krog

Beckholmsvägen 26
115 21 Stockholm

Opening Hours
Sun & Mon Closed
Tues – Sat from 6:00 pm

 
 

Agrikultur

It’s all about the veggies at Agrikultur. This charming, welcoming restaurant serves four and five course menus that highlight the best local vegetables of the season. For those looking for a gourmet yet unpretentious experience, this is your spot.

Their sister restaurant in Stockholm, Bar Agrikultur, is more casual and affordable, but shares similar menu offerings and overall focus.

Agrikultur

Roslagsgatan 43
113 54 Stockholm

Opening Hours:
Sun & Mon Closed
Tues – Sat 5:00 pm – midnight

 
 

Gastrologik

Using a kitchen philosophy they call “logical gastronomy,” founders and chefs Jacob Holmström and Anton Bjuhr have created perhaps the most farm-to-table of the Michelin star restaurants in Stockholm. Gastrologik only uses Swedish ingredients, and works closely with farmers for each menu item so that they can vouch for not only quality, but also transparency and ethical production.

The interior of the restaurant is ultra-modern and minimalist, as is the look of the dishes. At heart, though, this is about taking pride in local ingredients and the traditions of Swedish/Nordic cuisine.

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Among the wild reed beds close to Christiania beach in the south of Copenhagen, Lisa Weber docks her small dingy on a makeshift pontoon and ushers me aboard. Over on the opposite bank, I glimpse the upscale headquarters of Danish startup firms; behind them, Copenhagen Opera House looms in the distance.

“That’s Raphael,” she says, waving to someone in a small yacht as we paddle out. “His boat was towed away, so he took over that one. That’s kind of how it works around here.”

We’re headed for Lisa’s home and art gallery, one of the 40 or so anchored vessels that make up the community of Fredens Havn, known locally as the “Pirate Harbor.” Some of its residents have lived here for years; others come and go with the seasons. Lisa arrived in October 2016, a few months after starting her master’s degree.

“When I first looked for a place, I used Facebook and, you know, all the typical stuff,” she says. “Then, a day before I was supposed to move into an apartment [in July 2016], they cancelled. So I was pretty devastated – like, shit! What am I going to do?”

From January, Lisa had been living at Floating City, a Copenhagen art collective in the south west of Copenhagen that provides tools, recycled materials, and water space to volunteers for ethical projects, including houseboat construction. Instead of lengthening her housing search, she chose to stay on and build her own accommodation.

Helped by a team of friends, Lisa designed a “carriage” shaped float with windows on all sides. But just as her plans were reaching fruition, she hit a snag: “I realized I couldn’t stay on Floating City’s water space because of [internal] conflicts,” Lisa reveals. “So a person who lived at Floating City told me I should go to the Pirate Harbour instead.”

“The thing with Pirate Harbor, though, is there are bridges that close off the water space,” she adds. “You can raise the bridges, but the people operating them don’t like to let others in.”

The team decided to construct Lisa’s home in segments, then transport it by road to the new location. They worked almost entirely with recycled material; Lisa’s sole purchase was fourteen wooden roof beams. In October, they arrived on Christiania Beach with the structure. Lisa finally moved into her home in late November.

“The first nights were really stressful,” she remembers. “After four months of hard work, I was worried someone could come and just tell us to leave. Apart from that, it was really cold. We had a bottle of olive oil, and it was constantly solid. But it was still much warmer than outside because it was really well insulated.”

Lisa adopted rudimentary methods for cooking and keeping warm during that first winter. “We used lots of tea candles to heat the float,” she says. “We had twenty tea lights going at the same time, and actually – maybe you don’t expect it – but it really helps. And also, if you have twelve tea candles and arrange them in a circle, and you take some aluminum foil, you can bring water to a boil.”

Over the following months, Lisa fabricated pieces of furniture and a wood fire heater, later adding a gas cooker, solar panels, and a compost toilet. With funding from Snabslanten, a cultural agency, she re-purposed her float as a public art gallery: the Floating Kitty Art Gallery, exhibiting photography, paintings, and commissioning murals. Besides these home improvements, she turned her attention to environmental conversation.

“A lot of trash from Copenhagen’s waters ends up here; that’s just the way it flows,” Lisa explains. “Pirate Harbor has been cleaning up the shore before each spring. In February, we get together and pick up trash every weekend.”

This concern extends to the wildlife population. “The swans have a nest on those pieces of wood that we put in the water,” she says, gesturing to an area close to the reed beds. “They can only breed because we have put boats in the water that break the waves, and we have planks in the water that also protect the nests.”

Lisa argues steps like this demonstrate the community’s deep-rooted connection to the waterway. “I was in Australia just recently – when you talk of the indigenous people there, you talk of the traditional custodians of the land,” she says. “That’s kind of how I feel, especially when I talk with the person who’s lived here the longest. It’s not about owning the place or the land but about taking care of it and looking after it.”

Without ownership rights, however, the Fredens Havn community may soon have to abandon their homes. “I got news of an eviction, that some concrete action would happen, in February [2019],” she says. “They delivered letters to every boat. They had done this in past years, but this time it seems a lot more serious because we know there’s this huge state budget.”

The channel where Fredens Havn sits isn’t a regulated maritime harbor; instead the state classes it as part of Denmark’s coastline. This means boats can lawfully anchor on the waterway for free without paying fees, just like vessels that moor out at sea. But kystdirektorat, the authority in charge, wants boats without a means of propulsion (a functioning mast or engine) to leave. The community recently struck a deal to remove a number of unoccupied crafts, but their collective’s future hangs in the balance.

This state of affairs contrasts with the fortunes of wealthy landowners in the country. In March, research institute Finans Denmark reported nationwide real estate had topped 2007’s pre-crash valuations; the country’s rental market remains one of the most competitive in Europe, ranked 7th. This inaccessibility has contributed to a rise in homelessness, with thinktank Kraka citing an increase across Denmark between 2010 and 2018 – weighted heavily among those aged 18 to 29.

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Eva Bartels arrives to our meeting wearing a pair of her own shoes, of course. The yellow and black stripes stand out against the white cotton, with a mid-size heel and a clean, open-toe mule silhouette. It is clearly a very good shoe.

“I figured I should be wearing them to meet you,” Eva laughs when I pointedly stare at her feet (which, by the way, unless you are writing an article about someone’s shoes, you shouldn’t do in polite company). It’s something you have to get used to when you wear Bartels shoes, because they’re not an accessory that fades into the background.

Launched by her great-grandfather in 1920, Bartels is a brand with a rich history. After moving from his native Germany to Denmark, along with his Belgian wife, Eva’s great-grandfather opened a shoe factory in Vesterbro, Copenhagen. In it, craftspeople from Italy created fashionable shoes, with men doing the cobbling and women working on the detailing.

The company was passed on to his daughter and her husband, Eva’s grandparents, and then to her father, aunt and uncle in the 1970s. With her father handling production and sales, her uncle handling administration, and her aunt designing, Bartels continued to run out of Vesterbro. By the late 1980s, Bartels could no longer compete with prices for outsourced production and closed both the factory and the brand.

Being a man devoted to shoes, Eva’s father stayed in the industry. He imported and sold shoes for years. “Our house was full of shoes,” Eva says, smiling. “My dad was always talking about how this aspect or that aspect made a good shoe. He was passionate about what makes a really good shoe. He was, really, a shoe geek!”

Though Bartels was laying dormant, it was always in the back of Eva’s mind as she grew up. She studied shoe design and cobbling in Milan at 19 years old, coming back to Copenhagen to work in fashion retail. In 2012, she slowly begin researching the shoe production process. In 2016, she was introduced to a family-run, three-person factory in Italy that makes custom bridal shoes.

“I knew this was the factory for me,” Eva explains. “I only do about 50 pairs per production and I don’t work with traditional seasons. I wanted to be sure that the quality is the highest and that the communication between myself and the factory is really good.”

While searching for fabric, she came across deadstock that had been used for parasols in Italy. That’s the striped pattern you see on her shoes today. “I thought, wow, this is really unique. The fabric has a story, just like Bartels does.”

Finally, in March of 2017, Eva Bartels re-launched Bartels Since 1920, the shoe company started by her great-grandfather. As we talk, she shows me old advertisements and images of the original shoes; they are surprisingly modern and totally chic.

“A pair was shoes was 75 DKK!” Eva laughs. “Can you imagine a stylish, new pair of leather shoes for 75 DKK in Magasin? That’s where they were sold.”

The next step for Eva is rounding out her collection. There are currently two shoe styles, and she’d like to get to seven, creating a shoe wardrobe that addresses the needs of most women.

“I’m not looking to do trendy stuff,” Eva says. “It’s about creating a good product that is comfortable, beautiful and timeless. And of course, high-quality. That’s what my great-grandfather did, that’s what my grandfather did, that’s what my father did. Now, I do it. I don’t really consider myself a shoe designer. I’m just…Bartels.”


 

Find out more about Bartels Since 1920 and shop the collection.

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The Blue Lagoon is one of the most beloved and popular tourist sights in Iceland. Located in Reykjanes UNESCO Geopark, only a 20 minute drive from Keflavík International Airport and about an hour from Reykjavik, the man-made lagoon stays at a warm 102°F (39°C) all year round, making it an ideal spot for locals and visitors at any time of year. Guests agree; over one million people per year use the Blue Lagoon, with that number growing annually.

The pastel blue water, rich minerals, soothing warmth, and easy accessibility offer the perfect spot for a day or weekend trip for those visiting Iceland, and a regular stop for those living in the country. The lagoon is so busy, in fact, that you’ll have to book your tickets days, if not weeks, in advance before going (more on that below!). Thought the lagoon opens in the morning, we recommend going in the afternoon or evening if you’d like to experience the Northern Lights in late fall and winter or the “land of the midnight sun” in summer.

Not sure what to do at the Blue Lagoon? We’ve covered everything from practicalities to luxuries, and even what to know before going with kids, so you can enjoy the full experience: History and formation of the Blue Lagoon

The Svartsengi Geothermal Power Plant opened in 1976. Geothermal power is water near a lava flow that is heated to extremely high temperatures in order to power turbines that subsequently create electricity. After being used for the turbines, the water goes through a heat exchanger, which is used to heat a local water source. Then the water is considered waste, and is dumped into pools outside the plant. These pools later became the Blue Lagoon.

In 1981, a psoriasis patient named Valur Margeirsson asked permission from the chairman of the plan to bath in the water, hoping it would improve his skin condition. Happily, it did! He named the place “Bláa Lónið” (Blue Lagoon in English), and that’s been the name ever since. Official baths were opened in 1987 – a simple structure with a few showers – that were largely used by those hoping to relieve skin conditions.

The Blue Lagoon company, the private company that owns the lagoon, formed in 1992 in order to expand and manage the area. The Blue Lagoon as we know it today was opened in 1999, and has been massively popular ever since, with international acclaim following stellar recommendations from global media and travel guides.

Because Icelanders have a strong bathing culture, using both public pools and hot springs across the country, locals were quick to understand both the physical and mental benefits of spending time in the lagoon. It is not only a place to improve skin condition, but also to relax and enjoy the calm beauty of nature on your own or with loved ones. The lagoon is 8,700 square metres and continues to grow to accommodate more visitors every year.

 
 

Is the Blue Lagoon good for your skin?

Yes! The Blue Lagoon is known as an effective treatment for psoriasis and other skin conditions. In the 90s, after anecdotal evidence of its effects were known, scientific studies confirmed these findings. A psoriasis clinic was opened at the Blue Lagoon in 1994 and still exists today, with both introductory on-site and outpatient treatments.

The skin benefits of the lagoon come from the mineral-rich water, which contains silica (that’s how it gets its milky color), algae, and salts. [Editor’s note: I suffer from fairly bad eczema on my hands. Upon leaving the Blue Lagoon, a flare up from the day before was significantly healed and the itch was completely gone for about 48 hours.]

The Blue Lagoon company offers a number of skincare products that can be purchased at the Blue Lagoon, online, and in their stores. We recommend their Silica Mud Mask, made from the mud at the bottom of the lagoon, which strengthens the skin barrier and deep cleanses without over-drying.

 
 

What to do at the Blue Lagoon How to enter the Blue Lagoon

From the parking and drop-off area, you’ll walk a few hundred metres on a path cut through lava. Consider it your transport to another world. Once you’ve reached the entrance, line up for the reception and show your ticket. You’ll receive a waterproof plastic bracelet that will act as your ticket for the rest of your stay. This bracelet allows you to use the lockers in the changing room and purchase goods like masks or drinks in the lagoon itself. Items will be charged to the bracelet and you pay at the end of your stay.

Depending on the ticket you purchased, you’ll receive a towel and possibly slippers and a robe. Walk into the changing room of your identified gender, change into your swim gear and leave your bags in one of the lockers, then take a shower. Afterwards, you can make your way to the lagoon entrance, where you’ll find a hook for your towel. Now take those first steps into the Blue Lagoon: welcome to paradise!

 
 

Food and drink at the Blue Lagoon

It is possible to purchase simple food and drink while visiting the spa. There is a lagoon cafe that offers small items like cookies, coffee, juice, sandwiches, and other nibbles.

There is also bar within the waters of the Blue Lagoon itself. There you can buy alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks, including sparkling wine and green smoothies. Why not one of each? All items at the cafe and bar can be purchased using the plastic bracelet you receive at the entrance. Then just float and sip.

See more below on the restaurants adjoining the lagoon, including Lava Restaurant on-site, and Moss Restaurant at the Retreat Hotel.

 
 

Blue Lagoon spa amenities

There are a number of ways to maximize your relaxation time while at the Blue Lagoon. Within the lagoon there is a mud bar where you can try silica mud, algae, or mineral masks. The silica mud mask is free with entrance ticket, and others masks are included with the premium ticket or as separate purchases on your plastic bracelet. Almost everyone wears the masks during their time in the lagoon; don’t be afraid to slap it on and let it sit for a few minutes while your skin drinks it all in, then just rinse off with the lagoon water.

There is a steam bath and a Finnish-style wooden sauna for guests, as well as a viewing area where you can sit indoors with a view of the lagoon. Allow the man-made waterfall to cascade over your shoulders or back for a great way to relieve stress and rejuvenate your muscles.

You can book a in-water massage, salt scrub, silica wrap, or just go for the full two hour treatment and get it all! The full service costs 31,200 ISK (250 USD/220 EUR/1,700 DKK).

 
 

Hotels and Restaurants at the Blue Lagoon The Retreat Hotel and Spa at the Blue Lagoon

The Retreat Hotel and Space, offering 62 suites, is the first five star hotel in Iceland, and it doesn’t get more luxurious than this. Created by Design Group Italia and Basalt Architects to maximise interaction with the opaque blue water, black lava, and green moss that surround the building, the hotel brilliantly brings in light and focuses on optimizing views of the lagoon for their guests. Built directly on top of an 800-year-old lava flow at Svartsengi, the hotel includes plush common areas, a yoga room, Moss restaurant, and a world-class spa.

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Danish architect Jørn Utzon was known as a visionary, with the ability to work between functionality and fantasy. The best example of this is his globally-renown work designing the Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia.

Utzon travelled the world collecting inspiration and references for his projects, and this can be seen throughout the inventive silhouettes and layouts of his work. Jørn Utzon designed mainly through the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, with a huge portfolio of work ranging from private residential spaces to large-scale public spaces. From small houses to iconic masterpieces, Utzon’s work is always unexpected, playful, and inventive.

 

These are the important Jørn Utzon buildings to know: Can Lis house by Jørn Utzon

Can Lis is a project located in Porto Petro, Mallorca, built in 1972 and in-use between 1974-75. The house sits between the sea and the road, designed for Utzon himself and his family.

The building was inspired by Spanish architecture and built with local materials such as Santanyi sandstone and Maré sandstone. The roof is made with modular ceramics called “bovedillas” supported by concrete structural beams.

The layout is divided into four smaller buildings and connected by corridors. The largest space is composed of a kitchen and dining area and a large courtyard. The following smaller buildings are the living area, bedroom spaces, and studio. The site is uphill; one can see the sea and surrounding green area from the terraces.

Luckily for design and architecture lovers, it is possible to visit the house, which is currently administered by the Utzon Foundation. There are restrictions on the number of visitors so be sure to check the website before going.

Can Lis house, 1971 by Jørn Utzon, Photography by Torben Eskerod

Can Lis house, Majorca, Spain, 1971

Ctra. Santanyí-Alqueria Blanca, 81
07691 Santanyí
Illes Balears
Spain

 
 

Sydney Opera House by Jørn Utzon

The Sydney Opera House is the most iconic project by Jørn Utzon. Utzon won an international competition in 1957, swaying the jury with his provocative design. It is one of the first buildings to be designed with the

The building is divided into a concert hall, library, cinema, restaurants, bars, and dressing areas. The interior layout was modified during the construction, as well as the shells. The main roof construction had to be reformulated with the engineers in order to be produced and built. The shells are covered by more than 1 million Swedish tiles, and feature tall glass windows facing the sea.

 

In 1966, after nine years of work, Utzon resigned from the project; it had gone way over budget and funds were withheld, meaning that Utzon couldn’t pay himself or his team. Australian architect Peter Hall took over the project. When he spoke with Utzon before accepting the commission, apparently Utzon told him that he’d never manage to finish the building. Despite that, the Sydney Opera House opened in 1973 to incredible acclaim.

In 2007 the Sydney Opera House was recognised with inclusion on the UNESCO World Heritage List, cementing its status as one of the most important and influential silhouettes in modern architecture. Utzon never returned to Australia to see the finished building.

Sydney Opera House, 1973 by Jørn Utzon

Sydney Opera House

Bennelong Point
Sydney NSW 2000
Australia

 
 

Kuwait National Assembly by Jørn Utzon

Jørn Utzon was well known for his ability to bring references from different cultures into his work. After designing and building the Sydney Opera House, Utzon was invited to enter an international competition to design The Kuwait National Assembly Complex (Kuwait Parliament); the result was an astonishing modernist building.

The project is not only iconic by its design, but also by its location. The highest point of the main roof opens up towards the water and the rest is nicely spread on the site. The interior features replicas of Arabic ornaments and decorative details, as well as a functional grid which connects the difference spaces.

The project was, and continues to be, criticized for the fact that a foreign architect built such an important national building. The building was renovated and painted after the Gulf War, significantly changing the original look designed by Utzon.


 

Kuwait National Assembly

Arabian Gulf St
Al Kuwayt
Kuwait

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Copenhagen Photo Festival, Denmark’s largest annual festival dedicated to photography, runs from 6 – 16th June this year. Now celebrating ten years, the festival showcases the most interesting, innovative, and socially conscious work to be found in Denmark and across Europe. This year’s festival includes exhibitions, workshops, talks, and parties, all with an eye to what’s happening in contemporary photography.

Here’s what we recommend this year at Copenhagen Photo Festival: Encounters – Nordic Photography Beyond Borders

A collaboration between Nordic artists, curators, and organisations, this exhibition showcases the work of five exciting photographers from across the Nordic countries. The pieces tackle such issues as local effects of globalization, migration, and much more. The concept is to explore the visualization of social engagement; this is sure to be thought-provoking and beautiful.


 

Friday 7th June – Sunday 11th August

Gallery Opening Hours:
Mon Closed
Tues, Weds & Fri 12:00 – 6:00 pm
Thurs 12:00 – 8:00 pm
Sat & Sun 12:00 – 4:00 pm

Vernissage is Friday 7th June, 5:00 – 7:00 pm

Fotografisk Center

Staldgade 16
1699 København V

 
 

Camera Obscura: Pinhole Camera Workshop

Spend a day learning about pinhole cameras: a camera with no lens that instead has only a small aperture and produces a so-called “camera obscura” effect. You’ll get to create your own camera and learn how to produce images alongside photographer Laila Svensgaard. The workshop includes all of the materials to make your camera, paper to print on, the chance to buy further materials after the workshop, and coffee and cake during the day.

Friday, 14th June
1:00 – 7:00 pm

The PHOTOSCOPE

Rigensgade 28
1316 København K

Ticket cost: 1050 DKK

 
 

Auction at Bruun Rasmussen

Want to own some real art, or just see how an art auction works? Come to the Bruun Rasmussen auction of “The Censored Exhibition,” the festival’s biggest group exhibition this year, taking place at Photo City from 6 – 16th June. At the auction, you’ll be able to purchase works from Alex Marchis, Anna Cherednikova, Dieter Schamne, Qian Jin, Sofie Pihl, and many more. This is your chance to snag incredible original work for (potentially) affordable prices!

Sunday, 16th June
5:00 – 6:00 pm

Photo City

Festivalcentrum
Refshaleøen
1432 Købehavn K

See the full Copenhagen Photo Festival program.

Header image: Tover Kurzweil self portrait

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NorthSide Festival will be held from 6th – 8th June this year. The music festival takes place in Aarhus, Denmark, and features top-tier international and local talent. This year’s line up includes beloved Danish artists like Oh Land and Lydmor, as well as global stars like Mark Ronson, Migos, and The Streets. Considered Denmark’s “mini-Roskilde Festival” for those who want the music but would rather not camp out for a whole week or, you know, get covered in pee-dust, NorthSide has developed a reputation for attracting not only great music, but wonderful food, drink, and events over the three days.

Whether you’re going or not, why not check out the best music from this year’s roster?

Enjoy the best of NorthSide Festival 2019 with our playlist:


 

See more on NorthSide Festival, or check out some previous years!

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The history of Icelandic fashion is mostly built around technical-wear; brands that have learned to help people handle the harsh weather conditions throughout a large part of a year. 66°North has a been a clear leader on the scene since the brand was founded in 1926, first producing clothes for Icelandic fishermen and ICE-SAR (Icelandic Association for Search and Rescue).

Recently, other brands have been emerging on the Icelandic fashion and design scene. There’s a DIY vibe and sense of playfulness to the collections that showcases the first blooms of Iceland’s artistic fashion scene. As with much of the design in Iceland, sustainability is a key factor found throughout the brands’ ethos. Color, pattern, and general eschewing of minimalism are found in many of these brands; Iceland is a country that truly plays by its own fashion rules.

These are the cool Icelandic fashion brands you need to know about: Hildur Yeoman

With pattern-heavy, colorful, and figure-hugging designs, Holder Yeoman has fast become an Icelandic favorite with celebrities and the general population alike. Her work is joyful and a bit tongue-in-cheek; definitely not minimalist!

 
 

Swimslow

Developed as a testament to the bathing culture in Iceland – people are really into their bathing, and wouldn’t you be, with all those hot springs? – swimslow designs minimalist swimwear that is produced from leftover luxury materials in Italy. The suits are beautiful; another great reason to take a dip while you’re in Iceland!

 
 

Eygló

Icelandic fashion designer Eygló has won numerous awards for her work, and is part of the fashion collective shop KIOSK in downtown Reykjavik – a popular destination for those looking for the latest local fashion. Her work is funny and loud (a recent collection was titled “Murder She Wrote”), with unexpected silhouettes and humorous patterns that nevertheless look stylish and cool.

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