Loading...

Follow Jeanne Bliss Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

How does a global consumer brand create value for its customers, consumers, and employees? In today’s episode, we talk to Chester Twigg, the first global chief customer officer at Johnson & Johnson. Chester shares that he was approached for the role because there was an internal recognition that it was a position that could truly add value to the business and the organization, to drive a more global consistency around selling.

There’s a lot of great strategic advice in here for those of you who are improving CX in the consumer goods sector, so I encourage you to listen to the full episode!

Create Value for All of Your Constituents

When Chester stepped into the role, he shares that he knew he wanted to focus on providing more value with their three constituents: the customer (retail partner), the consumer (the shopper), and the company. He knew that he had to think through the following: how do you create the best selling team? How do you ensure that there are consistent systems and processes in place to help them deliver their best every day?

To execute their business objective of providing value, Chester and his team picked 5 areas that were relevant to them. They develop strategies for improvement around these 5 areas under an acronym: RACES, as in “off to the races” to help them remember.

R: Revenue growth management. Determine how to best drive strategy pricing, strategic trade promotion, and assortment portfolio distribution.

A: Accelerate in winning channels. With the understanding that business is shifting heavily into E-commerce, they asked themselves how they could win in this category.

C: Customer team reinvention. Since most of J&J’s business is with big retailers, they have to figure out how to best do business together. How can they create optimal joint business planning?

E: Emerging market excellence. Growth is happening more in emerging markets than in developing markets so how can they reach customers in these new areas?

S: Shopper refocus. Rethink how to work with marketing, R&D, and the supply chain to ensure their products show up well both online and on the shelf.

Chester explains that it was relatively easy for the team to align on these strategies and that some strategies have been tabled for a RACES 2.0 to tackle at a later time.

Keep Employees Engaged and Informed Internal social networking

At Johnson & Johnson, there are over 4,000 salespeople. To keep the salespeople engaged, Chester and his team have instituted quarterly meetings for updates on the business, priorities, and strategies. There’s also an opportunity to answer questions which can be asked anonymously, which helps leadership stay on the pulse of what’s going on and what people are worried about.

Chester also shares that J&J has a designated social media site called Yammer, where employees can post updates and engage with each other. Chester posts regularly, especially when he’s with customers or key individuals so people know what’s going on. He also updates employees through his blog, Chester’s Chatter which he and the leadership team contribute to each month.

Rethink Training and Hiring Practices

Additionally, Chester and his team spent time improving training within the organization for salespeople. Recognizing that the younger generation of salespeople learns differently, they removed the outdated five-day, intensive “this is how we sell” program. Chester explains that training is now done in bite-sized, Internet-based sessions. This is their way of providing value to employees; giving them access to something when they need it, as they need it.

When it comes to improving the employee experience, Chester also says that at Johnson & Johnson they worked more closely with HR to improve hiring and recruiting strategies. They provided more clarity on capabilities they were looking for regarding salespeople, and also sought to increase diversity.

According to Chester, it’s best to work with HR to get their buy-in for new recruitment strategies by explaining how hiring practices connect back to the purpose of the work, it helps the process move along more smoothly.

It's best to work with HR to get their buy-in for new recruitment strategies by explaining how hiring practices connect back to the purpose of the work, it helps the process move along more smoothly. -Chester Twigg, @JNJCares
Click To Tweet
What Do You Know Now That You Wish You Knew Then?

Chester says:

“I think a better understanding of my organization and the style, which is always hard when you come in, would have helped me to build capabilities and conference even faster. I mean one of the advantages I had in my previous company having worked there for a long, long time was that I knew the people. Either they had worked for you before or you had peripheral experience. And so one of the challenges was understanding how to best apply situational leadership because I’m a big believer that people should be led through situational leadership.”

I'm a big believer that people should be led through situational leadership. -Chester Twigg, CCO @JNJCares
Click To Tweet
About Chester Twigg

Chester joined Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. from Procter & Gamble, where he spent over 25 years in various roles across the world including the US, China, India, Singapore and Europe. At Johnson & Johnson, Chester plays an important role in the execution of the company’s global consumer strategy, developing new ways of selling to maximize growth and value creation within the sales organization.

Chester holds an MBA (Marketing) and a B.COM. (Commerce and Economics) from the University of Mumbai, India. Chester is based in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In my Daily Dose video series, I explore the topics that chief customer officers must grapple with on a daily basis. Join me as I discuss what I’ve learned over the course of my 35-year career, so that you can more effectively do the work that needs to be done.

Today’s video is an excerpt from my online course, inspired by my book, Would You Do That To Your Mother? Click here to learn more about the course and enroll. 

The following is a lightly edited transcript of the video below.

When we need help, time is compressed. We need help now. When that help comes swiftly, wrapped in a caring voice, whether it’s over the phone, social service, chat, or face to face, and with real help, we feel a little saved. We can get back to what we were supposed to be doing before our lives were interrupted.

Nurture Customer Rescue Artists - YouTube

There’s a huge opportunity here and now to rescue customers, to nurture customer rescue artists, who are available. Oh, but the tussle we go through at times on our way to getting help. Susan was directed to an 800 number to get an authorization for a prescription for her son. She had 15 minutes between meetings, so thought she’d make the call. When the phone rang immediately, she was relieved. Susan was then greeted with an automated phone tree asking her to input her insurance information and her name, and choose from a tree of seven options and the reason she was calling.

Don’t Put Your Customers Through the Phone Tree

Susan was then passed on to another operator who asked her to repeat the same information that she had just punched in, then verified her information, and then placed her on hold for six minutes to review her account. Would you want your mom to go through your phone tree? Would you pass her to three people before solving her problem? When Susan’s operator returned back to the line, she was asked for four more pieces of information. Then she was put on hold for four minutes. Each time she was on hold, Susan heard ads for the company’s products and services.

When the operator returned, she said that she needed to hand Susan’s case now over to a specialist. Six more minutes on hold, Susan was put into an automated phone tree asking her to input all of the information that she had originally entered. Susan now knew that she’d miss her next meeting but she didn’t want to begin again. When that specialist finally answered four minutes later, she asked the same information, but then she placed Susan on hold for seven more minutes, and finally returned with an approval.

Does any of this sound familiar? Of the 45% of consumers who initiated a purchase over the phone last year, 70% of them were put on hold. The number one phrase that makes all of us crazy is this doozy, I’m sure you’ve heard it, “Your call is very important to us, please continue to hold.” Well, why am I on hold if it was that important? Isn’t that what we always ask ourselves? This is your chance to hire, develop, and nurture people who are available to customers, who rescue them.

Let Your Availability Reflect How Much You Care

“I’m getting old while I’m waiting on hold,” it feels oh so true. But this is not just about being on hold, think about it as availability, flexibility in how customers can reach out, and your swiftness of care. Most importantly, with the increasing number of customers opting for self-service, when customers do reach you for help, it’s never been more important to be available. Let your availability reflect how much you care.

The Make Mom Proud companies adapt their availability to fit their customers’ needs and their customers lives. They’re flexible, available, offer swift human care when desired, and provide the right resources for customers who need them. Offering many versions of availability is what sets these companies apart.

At Bonobos, the clothing retailer, when call volumes spike, people all around the company are trained as white belt ninjas, different from their regular full-time customer ninjas, and they engage with customers swiftly. They kick in.

Hyatt Hotels, for example, invested two years to speed up their ability to take care of customers and be available to their needs. Discover card, for example, recently enabled customers to reach service agents via real-time texting, and eliminating the need to stay logged into the Discover App to receive assistance. Agents also have access to the customer’s full messaging history.

The Make Mom Proud companies adapt their availability to fit their customers' needs and their customers lives. #customerexperience #cx #makemomproud
Click To Tweet
Create the “We are Here for You” Feeling

Are you ready to make available synonymous with how you care to your customers? Think of your customers working that phone tree, on hold, listening to music or ads, waiting for chat to start, or watching their phone for your Twitter response. Build your version of available care fueled by customer rescue artists who help you earn the right to growth.

In every type of business vertical, the Make Mom Proud companies create the feeling for customers. We are here for you.

HOW WOULD YOUR COMPANY ACT IF EVERY CUSTOMER WERE YOUR MOM?

How do we cut through the rigmarole of business to give customers the treatment they desire, and employees the ability to deliver it?

In her latest book, customer experience expert Jeanne Bliss recommends making business personal to get the traction you need by focusing on one deceptively simple question: “Would you do that to your mother?”

Learn more
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“I am a bridge builder and I really like that aspect of my role,” says Yamini Rangan, chief customer officer at Dropbox, a SaaS company that offers file storage and collaboration solutions to both individuals and companies. With a background in sales and marketing, Yamini spent a lot of time talking to customers, mentioning that it was one of her favorite aspects of her job. Her love for being customer-focused was what helped drive her success at Dropbox, 

Though Yamini has only been in her current role at Dropbox for 8 months, she’s been at the company for over 3 years. Her experience has shown her that customers buy technology products because they’re trying to solve a particular problem for themselves, their companies, and for their customers. She shares that when you connect with your customers’ true needs, you’re able to offer better help and provide value to them.

Yamini shares strategies that she has employed within Dropbox, that keeps her leaders and C-Suite aligned to the same goals of customer-centricity.

Prevent Siloed CX Work at Large Scale Companies

Since Dropbox has gone through a hyper-growth period, Yamini shares that it was important that her teams united internally to focus on customers. The goal was to prevent departments from becoming siloed in their operations. As CCO, her role is about embedding the customer centricity into the DNA of the company.

Yamini shares that she developed a one-year plan within the first 90 days of her role. She spent the first 3 months listening to employees and customers so she could understand both perspectives; she needed to know what was and wasn’t working and take those suggestions into account during planning. Yamini would ask customers, “What’s good about Dropbox – what is not good about Dropbox, and where can we continue to improve.” She explains that they spent time going over the responses to determine what actions they needed to take next.

Yamini tells that her leadership teams and C-Suite are all invested in being customer-focused. Since they’re invested in the vision, her conversations are often around prioritization and sequencing the right set of actions to take. Yamini and her leadership teams and C-Suite spend time listening to customer calls and support interactions. By listening, they’re able to analyze responses, understand the customer journey, and determine how to move forward.

By listening, they’re able to analyze responses, understand the customer journey, and determine how to move forward. -Yamini Rangan, @dropbox #CX #customerexperience
Click To Tweet
Take Your Leadership Teams Through the Customer Journey

Similar to many other leaders, Yamini and her team created a focus group, a “customer advisory board,” where they gathered their top 15-20 customers to talk to them about the product strategy and company vision, and they listen to what is and isn’t resonating with customers. According to Yamini, this unifies the executives more than any power point presentation, because they’re hearing it directly from the customers.

Additionally, Yamini and her team developed a Customer Connection Day. She explains that this is where they created immersion experiences that allowed employees to see and understand what the customer journey looks like. Employees needed to understand the various facets of what that experience is like when customers install Dropbox, how it’s commonly used, and what the customer support experience is like.

As Yamini and her team continued to dive into the customer journey, they looked at the qualitative and quantitative data gathered to learn the various customer friction points. By knowing these points of tension, they can improve the usage process for the customer. Yamini explains that in order to be tactical, you have to put yourself through the customer journey, dig into the patterns that drive and improve differentiation for the customers. After this, she shares that they make sure to close the loop on the listening and tactic cycle. Once she works with her team to implement changes at Dropbox, they check in with customers to see how things have progressed.

In order to be tactical, you have to put yourself through the customer journey, dig into the patterns that drive and improve differentiation for the customers. -Yamini Rangan, @dropbox
Click To Tweet
What Do You Know Now That You Wish You Knew Then?

Yamini says:

“I would say that pay attention to the human experience. One of the things that I’ve kind of intrinsically known but now I really know is that it’s not as much the largest initiatives that matter, it’s also the small changes that improve the experience that matters. Pay attention not just to the really large, needle-moving ones but also the small human experiences that change the perception of customers.”

About Yamini Rangan

As a strategic and results-oriented technology professional with 20 years experience across sales, marketing, operations, and strategy, Yamini Rangan serves as Chief Customer Officer at Dropbox. Previously, she was the company’s vice president of business strategy & operations.

Additionally, Yamini led the global sales strategy and operations at Workday, and prior to that, she held senior positions at Appirio and SAP.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In my Daily Dose video series, I explore the topics that chief customer officers must grapple with on a daily basis. Join me as I discuss what I’ve learned over the course of my 35-year career, so that you can more effectively do the work that needs to be done.

Today’s video is an excerpt from my online course, inspired by my book, Would You Do That To Your Mother? Click here to learn more about the course and enroll. 

The following is a lightly edited transcript of the video below.

In our lives as customers, we find hope, encouragement, and joy in companies who act with “congruence of heart and habit” – taking actions at work grounded in what they learned at home. In today’s Daily Dose, I want to share a story with you that helps illustrate what wonderful things can happen when companies empower and encourage their employees to act with this concept in mind.

Reward Employees for Congruence of Heart and Habit - YouTube

Blogger Lauren Casper and her husband had navigated their way through their local Trader Joe’s as best they could. The trip had turned a bit chaotic with the two children, and Lauren described how they were rushing to get done and out of the store. “Not only are we two white parents with a brown son and daughter,” she said as she described her day, “but our son has noticeable developmental delays and different behaviors caused by his autism, and our daughter has physical differences with her missing and webbed digits.”

She was close to tears from the outing when she heard someone call out her name in the parking lot. A young woman who worked at Trader Joe’s, who Lauren described as resembling her adopted daughter, held out a Trader Joe’s bouquet to her. As she delivered it to Lauren, she said, “I was adopted as a baby, and it has been a wonderful thing. We need more families like yours.”

Celebrate Kindness, Retain Employees

This type of action is not uncommon for Trader Joe’s employees who are hired and rewarded for team collaboration, innovation, and taking the initiative to delight customers as Lauren Casper experienced with her family. From always walking customers (never pointing) to that can of garbanzo beans that you can’t find, to the many spontaneous dance parties that erupt in the middle of the aisles, to people dashing to the back of the store to get something for a customer who forgot something to put in their basket, people are celebrated for these acts of kindness. It’s no wonder they have an unheard of 4% turnover of employees.

Celebrate and reward your people for their humanity. Make-mom-proud companies build their reward systems to celebrate actions of both heart, what we learned at home, and habit, the behaviors we are encouraged to continue. Congruence of heart and habit has at its core building an organization that reinforces the behaviors we learned when we were young, doing the right thing, taking the initiative, and treating others as we’d like to be treated.

Celebrate and reward your people for their humanity. #MakeMomProud companies build their reward systems to celebrate actions of both heart, what we learned at home, and habit, the behaviors we are encouraged to continue. #CustExp #CX
Click To Tweet
Go Beyond Words to Empower Employees

Employees want to do the right thing, and they want to be noticed for it. For example, at the investment firm where Joe worked, customer focus was a core value of the company. It was stressed in every meeting. A credo to customer service was engraved on the wall and survey scores were tracked. Yet, the metrics really discussed and heralded were average revenue per client, and profit margin, and the bottom line. To assist advisors in achieving these goals, they were trained in customer contact approaches and given quotas in the number of customers that they needed to contact each month and the number they needed to convert and grow.

However, to Joe, these guidelines felt limiting. He wanted to spend more time per customer to add value beyond those selling quotas, and this would throw Joe’s numbers and contact numbers out of whack. Joe found that spending more time with customers, guiding them, and helping them with value actually increased his long-term productivity, but he had to go outside the prescribed length of time with each customer. And at times, this meant that he did not meet his established monthly customer contact goals. Each time this occurred, Joe had to defend his approach and recap the growth he achieved with his clients over time because of his different and innovative approach.

And while each of these meetings ended well for Joe, he was always a little sunk that he wasn’t receiving reinforcement for doing the right thing. Over time, the repeated focus on numbers without recognition of the quality of his engagements or his initiative actually led Joe to depart the company to join a firm whose core values were aligned with his. What Joe craved was to be rewarded and celebrated for making good, independent decisions and for his skills in innovating.

Employees Value Purpose and Trust

Joe is not alone in this desire. Employees asked about the subject in research conducted by Citigroup and LinkedIn said that they would actually pass up a 20% raise in exchange for more control over how they work. This means being part of a greater mission and being trusted to make decisions and take actions. Otherwise, companies will continue to lose good folks like Joe.

The takeaway…

Inadvertently, as companies grow with the stressors of making deadlines and sales goals, mixed messages can be sent about what is important and what will advance people in their careers. But when employees are recognized and rewarded for taking the time to extend themselves personally, they will want to stay. When the moments when employees take a chance to right a wrong or solve an issue bravely are heralded and rewarded, an elevated kind of company emerges.

So ask yourself, do you recognize employees for their ability to care, to innovate, and to take the initiative?

HOW WOULD YOUR COMPANY ACT IF EVERY CUSTOMER WERE YOUR MOM?

How do we cut through the rigmarole of business to give customers the treatment they desire, and employees the ability to deliver it?

In her latest book, customer experience expert Jeanne Bliss recommends making business personal to get the traction you need by focusing on one deceptively simple question: “Would you do that to your mother?”

Learn more
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Start by being humble and you will inspire your team to be humble,” says Denis Drossart, global vice president of Culture & Experience at Selina, about leadership behaviors enforced within this lifestyle, travel and hospitality brand.

Selina is a startup platform that connects people to local places and activities for purpose-filled experiences. Combining the hostel community aspect with the accommodations of a luxury hotel, Selina breaks the barriers between the traditional hospitality experience and hostel. 

Denis shares some tactics and strategies regarding how they’ve shaped the purpose and culture of this hospitality-disruptive brand. With a focus on leadership and creating authentic connections, Denis and his team have created an essential framework to create the ultimate experience for guests and employees. 

1. Define Your Purpose and Value

Selina is a rapidly growing company that focuses on people and experiences, and Denis’ role was created because someone needed to lead the internal culture of the company. According to Denis, Selina employees can’t create memorable experiences without having an amazing experience within the company. So it became his job to ensure that his staff is supported in ways that empower and enables them to deliver great experiences to guests.

When he first stepped into the role, Denis shares that he spent time watching, learning, and talking to his staff. He needed to understand what was missing in the organization. Denis learned that Selina needed to define the culture, the brand’s identity, its purpose, and the desired experience they wanted guests to have. He explains that they needed language to define the behaviors that will help drive specific feelings.

It became his job to ensure that his staff is supported in ways that empower and enables them to deliver great experiences to guests. -Denis Drossart, #Selina #CX #CustomerExperience
Click To Tweet
 

2. Create Brand Identity and Values

Denis tells that a core value of Selina is to inspire authentic and meaningful connections with guests. To do so, he needed to align leaders and staff on the purpose of the business, then he developed four core behaviors to trigger the feelings they want to elicit out of their connectors and team.

Selina connectors are people who connect people, places, and communities around the world. A Selina connector can serve as a guide who exposes guests to the local culture, arts, food; sharing knowledge of the city or village. Even the Selina properties have been designed by local artists and incorporate upcycled furniture.

Four core behaviors are as follows:

Trust – care about what you do. Care about your people, the brand, and the communities/environments you work in. This generates trust.

Share – share your passion, share your enthusiasm, share your knowledge. If you keep sharing, people will learn. Sharing and learning goes hand in hand.

Creativity – Selina connectors need to be creative. Creatives drive fun. If people are creative within the organization and within the culture, they will drive a fun feeling.

Connect – guests and employees need to be able to connect. When they connect with one another, they’re able to feel like they belong to the movement they’re creating, which is a core part of the Selina identity.

3. Implement the Work

Once Denis defined the company’s culture and identity and instituted the four core behaviors, he implemented these values through a behavioral activation process.

He shares that this meant going out into the field and doing full-day face-to-face immersion sessions. During this time, Denis and his team take the full day at different Selina headquarters to onboard teams about the culture, experience teams they’re building, the company’s identity, and behaviors.

Denis and his Selina team also worked with an outside company to create a customized blueprint that defines the overall brand ecosystem. This blueprint laid out the company’s “who, what, why, and how,” the organization experience, and what behaviors are needed to trigger the experience. It defines the working plan needed to operate the behaviors as well as the leadership behaviors needed to activate it all.

Denis shares that leadership behavior required humility – which drives an authentic work environment, ultimately driving caring behavior. They also look for leaders who can inspire an educational working climate, as this quality is important for working with the team and connectors. These behaviors are also sought out during the recruitment phase. They actively look for specific behaviors in future candidates.

What Do You Know Now That You Wish You Knew Then?

Denis says:

“Make sure that we align on that language. To make sure that everybody’s aligned on the common desired experience, the desired behavior. And it sounds stupid, but making sure that all your employees, all your leadership team, all your executives, the CEO, they all speak the same language because that’s the ultimate goal of that company; it makes it so much easier. You wake up, and you suddenly know why you’re going to work. And obviously, it’s not for money. Well, I mean, it could be at least the money will be a consequence of your purpose, right? So yes, start with designing a couple of language goals.”

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In my Daily Dose video series, I explore the topics that chief customer officers must grapple with on a daily basis. Join me as I discuss what I’ve learned over the course of my 35-year career, so that you can more effectively do the work that needs to be done.

Today’s video is an excerpt from my online course, inspired by my book, Would You Do That To Your Mother? Click here to learn more about the course and enroll. 

The following is a lightly edited transcript of the video below.

In the movie, It’s A Wonderful Life, George and Mary Bailey create a memory for the Martini family when they help them take possession of their new home. Focusing on celebrating the new life of this family, George Bailey gives his iconic toast, offering the Martini family a loaf of bread, a bottle of wine, and a box of salt. And with this support, George and Mary Bailey become a part of the story of the Martini’s lives.

Earn Your Place in the Story of Customers' Lives - YouTube

And if the Martini’s were real people and not actors, they would soon forget all of the process and the experience of moving and mortgages, et cetera, as time passed. All of that would fall away and what they would remember is their joy and how the Bailey’s took care of them and made them feel in that moment, in that historic part of their life.

Do you create memories that will last a lifetime?

Make memory creation the currency of your brand. This is our opportunity to understand and to craft memories that will earn our place in customers lives.

In fact, Gallup research validates that these moments—that connect our experiences with customer memory—are a major opportunity to create lasting bonds with customers. Memory creation is a choice. In every interaction with customers, you can choose how you’ll deliver a memory and if you’ll deliver a memory.

The great news is, often, that choice comes at no cost. All it requires is that people act on the power they have to deliver that memory.

Memory creation is a choice. In every interaction with customers, you can choose how you'll deliver a memory and if you'll deliver a memory. #MakeMomProud
Click To Tweet

In fact, a warm and compassionate call or compassionate tweet; how a bag is handed to someone or how a sale is ended; even the sound and the tone of how information is delivered can make someone’s day, can deliver a moment—a memory of who you are as humans and bring people back to you, show that you have warmth and compassion.

Design experiences that are worth remembering

When you focus how you design your experiences on memory creation, not just executing tasks, customers will remember you and with those memories will come the opportunity to earn the right to business growth because you improved lives.

For example, in that mortgage experience, would you be more likely to take all of your banking business to a company that really helped and cared for you through one of life’s biggest purchases? Or would you like to get a “George Bailey” moment, as you took possession of your home?

With that kind of a memory, would you connect with the company? Would you stay with them?

Here is the opportunity we have in our work, through deliberate actions. Starting with customer needs, we can become a part of their lives. What do you do to identify and improve moments in customers lives and embed a memory?

As always, I’d love to hear your thoughts. Tweet at me @JeanneBliss or connect with me on LinkedIn

HOW WOULD YOUR COMPANY ACT IF EVERY CUSTOMER WERE YOUR MOM?

How do we cut through the rigmarole of business to give customers the treatment they desire, and employees the ability to deliver it?

In her latest book, customer experience expert Jeanne Bliss recommends making business personal to get the traction you need by focusing on one deceptively simple question: “Would you do that to your mother?”

Learn More

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“The caliber of the team here is remarkable, and I’ve never seen anything like it. So, that was the reason why I decided to join them. Now it’s been a little under two years, and I still feel the same way,” says Aurelia Pollet, the Vice President of Customer Experience at Exemplis. Exemplis is a B2B2C, which makes custom chairs and lounges for offices. 

In this episode, Aurelia tells us about the impressive company culture at Exemplis, and how she’s been supported in her role to lead the company’s CX into the future. Aurelia shares different approaches and strategies that she implemented in order to improve processes and better understand their customers (the furniture dealers), and ultimately, the end consumer.

Commit to Developing Your Company’s Culture

When Aurelia interviewed for her position, she was told that the first step of the process was to ensure she would be a cultural fit. Exemplis, a company whose motto is, “being easy to do business with,” was looking for employees who had the personality to fit within the organization. Aurelia was impressed by their commitment to the culture and she wanted to know how that translated to day-to-day behaviors.  

The Exemplis team shared with Aurelia that their core values guide their day-to-day decisions. These values impacted the behavior of employees; she mentioned one of them was selflessness. Employees are eager to help and work together to get the job done.

In addition to meeting her executive team, Aurelia also met with her direct team. Aurelia shares that she received a lot of feedback about the transparency of the company, which was impressive. Every day, the company’s main focus is to make sure they give customers what they want, and her role is to continue moving the work forward.

One of the core values at #Exemplis is selflessness. Employees are eager to help and work together to get the job done. -Aurelia Pollet, VP of #CX
Click To Tweet
Understand the People and Process

When Aurelia first took the role, she explains that she wanted to understand the people processes from a qualitative and quantitative perspective. She spent time in the boardroom with the CEO and with the executives who presented a high-level overview of the department. This allowed her to learn more about their customers and consumers.

Similar to many other leaders who embark on this journey, Aurelia shadowed her team members to understand the work from their perspective. She shares that she started looking at the customer processes; what was the website experience like? How do you place an order? How do you get an invoice? After assessing these experiences, she created the first draft of a customer journey. She wanted the company to have a clearer view of what things looked like from the customer’s standpoint.

Additionally, Aurelia noticed a CRM system wasn’t in place. With a desire to scale the business, they soon implemented Salesforce and developed relevant KPIs to measure for daily, weekly, and monthly performance. “We can only improve what we can measure,” was a phrase that stuck with Aurelia from a former boss. With this thought in mind, she focused on scaling the business and addressed some of the gaps she found in the customer journey.

Is it Good for the Customer?

As Aurelia increased awareness of the CX work across the company, she presented a new concept to her monthly management meeting. She shares that whenever someone on the team wants to change a process, add a service, or make a decision—there are two questions to ask: is it good for the brand and is it good for the customer?

Team members started using the questions on each other and executives used these questions in presentations, says Aurelia. When employees and leaders start incorporating CX language into their own work, it’s powerful and keeps the momentum going.

Whenever someone on the team wants to change a process, add a service, or make a decision—there are two questions to ask: is it good for the brand and is it good for the customer? -Aurelia Pollet, #Exemplis #customerexperience
Click To Tweet
What Do You Know Now That You Wish You Knew Then?

Aurelia says:

“I really focused on the customer part of the journey at the beginning and I think that the employee part of the journey is as important as the customer and so it’s really looking at it from both ends and not just mapping the customer journey, but understanding, how does that look like for the people in the organization?

And usually when we look at customer journeys, or how to improve processes, we think the CS Team, the Customer Service Team, the people on the phone, the people answering emails or chat, but it is necessary to look at everybody in the organization because if you say you can deliver a product in a certain amount of time, is it true from a manufacturing standpoint? Do you have the tools to tell you that it is deliverable? […] So, not only customer-facing teams are important, but the entire organization when you’re building a customer experience strategy.”

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In lieu of a regular Daily Dose video, I want to share with you an excerpt from a keynote I presented recently that focuses on the lessons of my most recent book, Would You Do That To Your Mother

The following is a lightly edited transcript of the video below.

Would you roll your mother into a hospital hallway and then leave her there? You know that you wouldn’t. But this kind of thing happens in every single one of our industries, because we’re focused on processes that are built for efficiency, and in doing so, we wire the human out of it.

How to Show Up as a Caring Company - YouTube

In this example, a wonderful tech probably took your mom out of the hospital, doing what he or she was supposed to do, rolled her to in front of the lab and put your mom in the hallway. The lab technician came out, did the tests for your mom, rolled her back in the hallway. That’s because we haven’t thought about weaving dignity into the experience. We haven’t operationalized hope and caring in a deliberate way.

Start with the Life at the Center, Not Technology

As technology is becoming a bigger and bigger part of our lives, what’s important is to acknowledge the purpose of technology, which is to enable care and enable people to do the right thing. But it takes starting with the life of your customer to know when to wire the technology in.

I have to tell you, an app alone will not get us there. If you are operationally efficient only because of your technology, it will only give you parity in the marketplace. Yes, if you’re lucky, your refrigerator repairman will keep you posted on when he or she will get to your home, but it’s the man or the woman and how they welcome you, if they put booties on their feet, and how they care for your furniture that tells you the kind of mom they’ve got.

Yes, you can walk completely through an airport without talking to a human, but it’s that gate agent who notices that you’re frantic because you’re about to lose and miss your flight who honors you with grace because he or she have been honored themselves.

3 Key Actions to Show Up as a Caring Company

In 2010, Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of Cleveland Clinic, brought everybody together. There were thousands of them, and he said to his entire team, “People respect how we deliver, how good we are technically at what we do in healthcare, but they don’t like us very much.”

So what they did back then was focus on three key actions, simple things that we can do. Those three things moved them to a very high “love” rating from patients and families, and also allowed them to become ranked number two by US News and World Report.

Click to open the file full-size and hit “File > Save” to download it.

Number one: they created a very simple “no passing” rule. What that means is that no matter who walks by a hospital room with that red call light on, you must go in and care for the human. You must go in and care for the human. It doesn’t matter if you’re a florist or a tech or whatever your job is, you are given permission to stop and take care of the life.

Number two: everyone was given the added job description of “caregiver.” Prior to this only doctors were caregivers; now on everybody’s card, they have caregiver in their title. This raises people’s level and gives them permission. If you’re delivering flowers and you see that somebody’s pillows are rumpled, you can take the time to care for them. You will be celebrated for it.

Give your team permission to take action and care for customers lives. Show them that they will be celebrated for it. In this video, I share a case study from @clevelandclinic that showcases how they #MakeMomProud.
Click To Tweet

Number three: they got rid of that crazy silo experience. If you’ve ever been in a hospital for yourself or a family member, you know you have to keep telling your story over and over and over and over again, depending on the doctor or the person taking your blood or the tech or the nurse. Instead, they have implemented 360-degree rounds. They go as a unit and care for the whole life.

When you care, you receive care back. So ask yourself: do you show up as a caring company?

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“I was really looking to achieve an experience that was elegant. I’m a big believer in that,” said Eleanor O’Neil, regarding her decision to create a customer success forecasting system. Eleanor is the Chief Customer Experience Officer at Workshare, a B2B company that manages document productivity and security software for legal firms.

Having held previous positions in the company as the Director of Commercial Operations, and Chief Information Officer, Eleanor ran the internal functions around operations and infrastructure and grew an awareness of what the customer lifecycle looked like. With this experience and insight, she knew she’d be able to scale the business and focus on how Workshare’s services can truly benefit the customer. Eleanor’s goal was to figure out a system that would improve customer success while also lifting some of the burdens off of the sales team.

Create a Customer-Focused Culture 

As CCEO, Eleanor’s role is to run operations and influence the selling experience since the two are connected to the customer journey and lifetime value. She shares that her goal was to help customers get impactful outcomes; it’s her responsibility to raise awareness of the customer within the organization, not just her own departments.

Eleanor explains that she wanted to tackle the customer culture inside the organization. Similar to other leaders, she noticed that their approach to customers was more reactive than proactive. Sales people were operating on a constant fear of customers leaving. To assuage these fears, Eleanor created a forecasting framework, showcasing that only a minority of the customers were actually in a churn space while a majority of customers were healthily engaged and using the product. With this finding, she shifted the optimal positioning goal for customers from stable and engaged, to advocates—ideally, these customers would advocate for Workshare.

Given this, the customer success function’s goal was not just to deliver happy, healthy customers, but to also create enthusiastic customers that wanted to tell their own Workshare success story. Eleanor tells us that it was important that she starting having meaningful conversations about churn. She introduced the phrases: control churn and strategic churn.

The customer success function’s goal was not just to deliver happy, healthy customers, but to also create enthusiastic customers that wanted to tell their own Workshare success story. -Eleanor O'Neil @workshare #customersuccess
Click To Tweet
Be Practical in How You Approach Churn

Eleanor’s approach to churn is to understand that it’s impossible to avoid. Rather than solving customer one-off problems, she invested in “customer success forecasting.” This forecast system is used to detect that something is going in the wrong direction with a customer as early as possible in order to resolve it. Eleanor has developed rules for forecasting based on factors like engagement, productivity/usage, potential mergers, and others.

Click to expand. (Photo Courtesy of Eleanor O’Neil; Workshare)

By regularly viewing the forecast, Eleanor and her team minimize churn. In addition to being mindful of these churn triggers, Eleanor recognizes that this system works both in the numeric sense and through customer service management.

Relationships can’t just be transactional and it’s important to strengthen relationships with customers as well. Know when your customer is going live, know when it’s time to renew, figure out ways to provide value to them and keep them apprised of the best ways to use the system.

The Customer Engagement Chart showcases how the teams able to look at data to analyze potential churn. These two quadrants of churn risk space: Poorly Engaged and Over Adopted, helps them focus their interests.

Eleanor’s experience has shown her that the science of sales is methodical and rigorous. When you combine that with the charismatic element of being out and about and engaging with customers, you can be powerful and get closer to customer success.

What Do You Know Now That You Wish You Knew Then?

Eleanor says:

“Honestly, I underestimated how loud, how authoritative, and how strategic the customer voice needs to be inside an organization, and I don’t think it can be loud enough. I think people holding these roles shouldn’t be held back by fear, or held back by what other parts of the organization would think. I think the customer is a really, really important part of the success of a technology company. And so I just hang on to that thought now and I think going forward that is something I will not let go of.”

I underestimated how loud, how authoritative, and how strategic the customer voice needs to be inside an organization, and I don't think it can be loud enough. - Eleanor O'Neil, @workshare #customersuccess
Click To Tweet
About Eleanor O’Neil

Eleanor O’Neill is the Chief Customer Experience Officer at Workshare, a legal technology company headquartered in London and serving customers globally.  Prior to her current role, Eleanor held the position of Chief Information Officer and Head of Operations at Workshare.  She is first and foremost a technologist and a transformational leader, and it was her passion for seeing technology delivered with excellence that brought her to the CCO role.
At Workshare, Eleanor leads the Customer Support, Customer Success, Digital and CX functions as the organization continues on a journey to embrace SaaS and deliver its next generation of legal technology products.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In my Daily Dose video series, I explore the topics that chief customer officers must grapple with on a daily basis. Join me as I discuss what I’ve learned over the course of my 35-year career, so that you can more effectively do the work that needs to be done.

Today’s video is an excerpt from my online course, inspired by my book, Would You Do That To Your Mother? Click here to learn more about the course and enroll. 

The following is a lightly edited transcript of the video below.

Do you believe customers are assets or cost centers? Thinking about customers as assets is my first customer experience competency. The idea of “customers as assets” gives you a simple way to measure whether you did or did not earn the right to customer-driven growth. In today’s episode, I bring this idea home with a story that’s all too common:

A Loyal Customer

When a new pet store moved into Jeanine’s neighborhood, she was ecstatic. Her schnauzer, Buddy, could now be just minutes from care if he needed it. And she just loved the convenience. The day after the store opened, she went over and registered Buddy, signed up for the loyalty program, and made an appointment for his first grooming. She continued those appointments every six weeks, like clockwork. Over the years, she also purchased all of Buddy’s toys and food from the store, and she went there for any physical ailments that he had. She was a devoted pet mom to Buddy, and she kept giving her business to the store because it was so close.

3 Actions to Take to Honor Customers as Assets - YouTube

But Jeanine was felt like something was missing in the experience with that store. It felt to her that Buddy was just a number there. Because the staff turned over constantly, no one recognized Buddy as a regular. The staff often didn’t check records before Buddy’s appointment to get to know him or to get to know Jeanine.

So when Jeanine showed up 10 minutes late for an appointment and was told that, because she wasn’t there on time, they had moved on to the next dog and she would have to reschedule her appointment, she’d had enough. The staff made no effort to give her the benefit of the doubt or even to contact her to find out where she was. They didn’t know her and certainly hadn’t tallied up all that she had spent there.

Jeanine stopped shopping there after five years of weekly purchases, constant grooming, and care that she went to that store for. The value she took with her as a customer was over $40,000 a year.

Customers Expect to Be Known. Do You Provide Your Team the Tools to Do So?

Would you take your mom’s money for years and then not recognize her or cut her a break? Well, you know the answer to that question.

Jeanine, like most customers, yearns for a company to keep track of and know how much they have given to an organization, and how much they’ve been loyal to them. They want people to know this information about them and honor them accordingly. They expect to be known.

Think of your own life as a customer. What’s the first thing you think of when a company you’ve been loyal to treats you like a number? It’s, “Don’t they know how much I spend here?”

If you walked into your favorite restaurant every week, and no one recognized you after the fifth visit, how would you feel? Would you eventually stop going?

Remember customers, take care of them, and don’t take them for granted. This is our opportunity to honor customers for how they honor us.

Most customers yearn for a company to keep track of and know how much they have given to an organization, and how much they've been loyal to them. They want people to know this information about them and honor them accordingly.
Click To Tweet
Commit to Understanding Customer Value

But it takes doing the hard work to know customer value, it takes the commitment to give your people the information and also the permission to make informed decisions about actions to take with and for the customers in front of them. According to Econsultancy, only 42% of companies are able to measure customer lifetime value. Those that do it, behave differently with their frontline, and with how they serve, and in how they reach out and embrace their customers.

Make-Mom-Proud companies, give their people the tools to know customer lifetime value, and to prepare them with options to ensure customers know they’re valued. This is our opportunity to say to customers, “We know you, we value you. We realize that without you, we don’t have a business.”

Signal That You Value Customer Loyalty: A Case Study

Alaska Airlines, for example, resists industry practices that signal to customers that they’re undervalued. Instead, they prove that they value customer loyalty, for example, by continuing to award miles to customers based on mileage. This presses against the industry shift to instead give miles based on ticket price.

This Alaska practice says, “We value you, that you fly with us.” Not, “We value you when you pay more.”

Listen to my podcast for another case study, featuring St. Jude Children’s Hospital, on honoring customers (in this case, donors) as assets.

HOW WOULD YOUR COMPANY ACT IF EVERY CUSTOMER WERE YOUR MOM?

How do we cut through the rigmarole of business to give customers the treatment they desire, and employees the ability to deliver it?

In her latest book, customer experience expert Jeanne Bliss recommends making business personal to get the traction you need by focusing on one deceptively simple question: “Would you do that to your mother?”

Learn more
Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview