Loading...

Follow A Table For Two | for forever ravenous travellers on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Skills & know how

As well as helping you decide what to cook we can also help you to cook it. From tips on cookery techniques to facts and information about health and nutrition, we’ve a wealth of foodie know how for you to explore.

See our how to section…

About BBC Good Food

We are the UK’s number one food brand. Whether you’re looking for healthy recipes and guides, family projects and meal plans, the latest gadget reviews, foodie travel inspiration or just the perfect recipe for dinner tonight, we’re here to help.

Our recipes

All our recipes are tested thoroughly by us to make sure they’re suitable for your kitchen at home. We know many of you are concerned about healthy eating, so we send them to a qualified nutritionist for thorough analysis too.

Start browsing our recipes now

Tell us what you think…

Love the new look or think we’ve missed the mark? We want to hear your thoughts – good and bad – to make sure we make the new website as useful as possible.

Get in touch

Magazine

Subscribe to BBC Good Food magazine and get triple-tested recipes delivered to your door, every month.

Order today!

On TV

See your favourite chefs on Sky Channel 133, BT 313 and find their recipes at goodfoodchannel.co.uk

Follow us

Join the BBC Good Food community by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and Google Plus.

Find out more here

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

And a lucky Orange Leaf Guest has the chance to win $1,000. 

Oklahoma City, OK  (RestaurantNews.com)  This July, Orange Leaf has teamed up with Oreo® to offer a new limited time flavor, Cookies ‘N Cream Gelato made with Oreo® Cookie Pieces! It’s all the best parts of the Oreo® Cookie in a decadent creamy dessert.

Additionally, Oreo® is giving a lucky Orange Leaf Guest the chance to win a $1,000 gift card. It’s as easy as snapping a selfie with a cup of Cookies ‘N Cream Gelato, tag Oreo®, Orange Leaf, and use the hashtag #OreoSummerSweepstakes. This delicious promotion will run until July 31st.

“We’re thrilled to partner with Oreo® for their 4th annual Oreo® Summer promotion! This flavor has already been a fast favorite and the gift card giveaway has been successfully driving additional online engagement through influencers and social shares,” said Kristen Campbell, Director of Marketing.

For Guests looking for a healthier option this summer, Acai Bowls are still available at your local Orange Leaf! They are made with a blend of organic acai, banana, and almond milk for a sweet fresh flavor. Top your bowl with granola or various fruits to make it even sweeter!

“Our partnerships and new product offerings this summer have been a crucial part in driving new Guests in each day and expanding other dayparts,” said Kendall Ware, President and COO of Orange Leaf. “We will continue to grow our offerings and brand partnerships to make life sweeter!”

About Orange Leaf

Orange Leaf is a self-serve, choose-your-own-toppings frozen yogurt and treat franchise with nearly 200 locations in the U.S. and Mexico. Orange Leaf offers a multitude of traditional and unique flavors, including no-sugar-added, gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan alternatives. Our mission is to make life sweeter by creating a memorable treat experience that is all about you. Every Guest can enjoy #flavorfreedom with any product at Orange Leaf.

We value the relationships with every store and consider them a strategic-partnership. We empower those relationships by maintaining the lowest fees in the industry, supporting veterans through our partnership with VetFran, and encouraging stores to provide value to their communities. Additionally, Orange Leaf is a member of the IFA, NRA, and a proud partner of No Kid Hungry. For more information, connect socially on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

Contact:
Kristen Campbell
405-816-4286
kcampbell@orangeleafyogurt.com


Source
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Small to midsize restaurants are doing everything they possibly can to acquire new customers and sales channels.  That includes signing up for food aggregator services like UberEats and Grubhub for the promise of increased exposure and orders.  But in reality, are food aggregator apps good for every restaurant?  

Food aggregator services may “sound” like an exciting opportunity for restaurants.  Restaurants get excited about the promise of new customers and a boost in sales, but oftentimes do not realize the heavy financial burden associated with these services.  With aggregator commissions as high as 30 percent on every order + delivery fee + service charge, restaurants are losing a significant portion of their already razor-thin profit margin.

Thinking of the bigger picture …

Does the restaurant know who is making the purchase when ordered through the aggregator app?

While restaurants aim to build a healthy bond with customers – converting new diners to regulars, enhancing the customer experience, and improving the bottom line – food aggregator apps make this nearly impossible.  There is no visibility to customer information and data, nor opportunity for personal engagement and relationship building.  

Restaurants are missing out on key data and insights around buying patterns, cross-sell opportunities and much more.  Customer engagement is absolutely essential for restaurant growth.

Why are restaurants willing to use aggregator apps when they significantly impact profits?

Restaurants have been compelled to sign up with food aggregator services with the promise of additional exposure, new customers, and sales, but they soon discover the commissions and fees associated with these services are significant.  Many restaurants are grappling with the tradeoffs between the benefits and impact on the bottom-line.     

Are the commissions and fees deducted for every order worth it?

For restaurants seeking out additional exposure and an additional sales channel – maybe. However, the significant costs may actually hurt what they have already worked so hard to achieve.  A 30 percent commission on every order + delivery fee + service fee does add up.

The good news is that there are other cost-effective and exciting technologies available for restaurants that customers love and have widely adopted – Mobile ordering apps, Self-ordering kiosks. 

Are aggregator apps helping restaurants stand out from the competition?

The answer is “no”.  Restaurants lack ways of differentiating from their competitors in these services.  This lack of differentiation and interaction with customers completely levels the playing field – which is good for some, and not so good for others.  What makes your restaurant special and unique is lost in the long list of restaurants provided for each search.  Your brand identity is absolutely marginalized in these services.  However, if your restaurant is new or struggling with low brand awareness these services may help elevate your awareness within your market.

There definitely are tradeoffs restaurants should weigh before participating in these aggregator services.   Again, the good news is that there are other cost-effective and exciting technologies available for restaurants that customers already love and will help build strong engagement & loyalty with your customer base.

A Custom Branded Mobile-Ordering App

Imagine a mobile-ordering app with your logo, graphics, menu items, and personal touch! Studies have shown the power of eye-catching graphics, and for restaurants this is a must-have feature.   Customers demand convenience and engagement.  Offering mobile ordering capabilities are imperative for restaurants to compete and grow their business, whether they have one location or a dozen. Mobile ordering apps help restaurants build personalized interaction with customers for targeted promotions and rewards. It’s the next step in a technology-driven world, making the process of eating out, or “eating out in”, more convenient for customers and more profitable for restaurants.

Affordable Self-Ordering Kiosk Systems

Order your meal with the ease of a touch screen kiosk. These self-ordering kiosks allow customers to choose food and beverage items on their own terms. Real-time recommendations can be made to compliment the order based on previous customer preferences, data insights, or restaurant input.   Kiosks can significantly reduce ordering wait times, allowing restaurants to process more orders with increased accuracy. From an operational perspective, kiosks help lower labor costs by reducing front-of-the-house employees and cash transactions.  

This exciting technology can help restaurants boost sales, delight their customers, and build brand loyalty. Investing in affordable kiosk technology is a smart choice for restaurants with ambitious business plans. 

So, do food aggregator apps make sense for all restaurants?  That answer is unique to each restaurant.  While exposure and access to new customers is critical for every establishment, the significant costs and impact to the bottom-line needs to be considered.  There are definitely trade-offs. While the costs are significant, does it hurt a restaurant to not participate in services such as UberEats and Grubhub?  

From a business growth perspective, restaurants should also be looking into new affordable technologies (mobile-ordering apps and kiosks) that delight customers and can go a long way into growing the customer base, increasing sales, and driving brand loyalty.

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
With a spread at Win Son. Photo: Scott Heins

Nicole Rucker’s pies inspire cross-country envy. The Los Angeles fruit fanatic and pastry chef opened Gjusta and Gjelina, which promptly became loci of aspirational obsession, before going on to launch Fiona, with the chef Shawn Pham, in November. There, she serves Victoria sponge cake and a Key-lime pie that the Los Angeles Times critic Bill Addison calls “a feat of reinvention.” Now you can make it yourself: The pie is featured in Rucker’s first cookbook, Dappled, as “the Lime Pie That Saved Us.” This week, Rucker was in New York to promote the book and, most important, to eat a bunch of fruit; chase down cookies from Burrow, a New York favorite; and partake of a top-shelf burger in “almost pajamas.” Read all about it in this week’s Grub Street Diet.

Tuesday, July 9
I got into New York around the middle of the night and had brought a box of peaches with me. This meant I got to eat a peach on the plane around 1 a.m. This was not my first time traveling with fruit! If I go to New York or Georgia or some place like that, I’ll bring a friend of mine there something from California. It’s like the equivalent of bringing a souvenir. When I go to New York in the fall, I take apples back with me because you guys have such different varieties. On the flip side, people bring me stuff all the time. People will bring fruits, especially, to the restaurant, like, “I went to Washington and I wanted you to have these cherries.” It’s a thing at this point.

Anyway, I woke up in my hotel starving and went to Daily Provisions with my book publicist Emily. I had an egg-salad sandwich. It was okay. I didn’t really appreciate the asparagus part of it and I thought that it was a little bit runny. But, to be honest, I was so tired and hungry at that point I didn’t really care. But you know what was really good? The citrus tonic. It was very salty citrus syrup with soda water. It really tasted like, in a good way, those vitamin C supplements that you dissolve under your tongue and have a fair amount of salt in them. I was really into that.

I then had a video shoot for my book with a local food recipe blog. The person I was doing it with has a dog, and that lifted my spirits 200 percent. Dogs are life.

Walked to Abraço. I try to go as much as possible when I’m here. Alan, my photographer, is close friends with the owners, Jamie and Liz, and I love them and what they built and how they’ve worked. I had the olive shortbread and an iced piccolo. I only went to the original one once, but I think the new one is so New York and I love the way it looks in there. How you can see back to the white-tiled kitchen and how there’s orange light in the front and orange cabinets.

People were in love all around me — it was cute. I missed my husband and my dogs. I love the heat though. It was glorious.

I was saving room for Prune. I go there every single time I’m here. A friend of mine took me a long time ago, I had never heard of it before. I couldn’t stop thinking about it, it was so great. There’s just something about it, an intangible: You can get a space and put a menu down and do all these things, but you can’t just make Prune over and over again.

I met my friend Mike for dinner. We had shrimp in anchovy butter, blue-cheese tomato toast, jerk chicken and some cold soup with potato and egg chunks that was very good. We asked Gabrielle about the potato soup and she said, “It’s like dirty dishwater with eggs and potatoes and it’s cold and it looks terrible and it’s really rustic and gross but, like, it’s delicious.” And we were like, “Okay, great.” It was really refreshing.

The jerk chicken made me think of my late stepmother Verna, it was the anniversary of her passing, and how I should probably spend the rest of the summer making jerk chicken. We also got to sit in the window. Gabrielle asked me why I named the book Dappled in a way that made me feel very seen and respected — she was intrigued.

I felt like I needed to have two desserts, so we walked around toward Morgenstern’s. I love how many types of vanilla they have. Got the burnt-honey vanilla and the strawberry. It had good strawberry flavor. Strawberry’s the hardest ice-cream flavor to make, other than lemon, in my opinion, so I usually try and order it. But I’m on a vanilla thing right now — I think my next book will be about vanilla and chocolate — and the guy at the register said his favorite vanilla was the one with honey in it. So I got those two.

It felt really early to be going to bed, and I had eaten dinner at like 5:30 p.m. So I went to some place called P.J. Clarke’s for a beer and burger, American cheese, alone. It just happened to be underneath my hotel. I usually would order a burger for room service, but they didn’t have room service at this hotel. It was great, and they put it on top of a huge pile of raw white onions. It was like an onion platform. And me, a woman sitting alone at a bar eating slices of white onions, at 11 at night, wearing almost pajamas.

Wednesday, July 10
Slept in! I didn’t eat breakfast. I was still full from the burger.

My husband usually brings me coffee while I am in bed, but he was not here and so I slept through my alarm and didn’t get anything. No coffee, no dog cuddles — nothing.

Went to the Union Square Greenmarket for fruit. Black raspberries found! One container, and I got it. Cherries of all kinds! Sour ones, too, OMG. Crazy raspberries that made me jealous. I was sweating like a beast.

Chugged an apple cider. Is this a juice cleanse now?!? I ate nothing all day. I existed on apple juice and cherries. Sat in the World Trade Center park and got approached by many people who thought I was selling fruit.

I did a peach-cobbler demo at Bon Appétit and ate half a biscuit, a bite of chocolate pie Chris Morocco was testing (I think I love him?), and a bite of cobbler. Emily Schultz let me make my own cortado on the espresso machine, which was an honor.

We were walking by Cha Cha Matcha and and I was feeling kind of dead inside, so I was like, Oh, maybe I’ll just get a matcha before I do this book signing so I’m not like a total zombie. I had a coconut iced latte because I am basic and the design of the store really got me. It wasn’t particularly delicious, but it also wasn’t bad.

Book signing at Rizzoli! Someone brought me gooseberries and white currants. More fruit! All I’d eaten so far this day was fruit.

Afterward I was hangry and alone. All my friends had plans. New York is the best place to eat alone, though. I went to Via Carota solo and had fried sardines with fennel, raw artichokes with Pecorino and orange, and a pasta with pesto that made me miss my husband. Pesto is his fave. I’m on a sardine-and-anchovy thing, so the sardines with the fried fennel were the reason I went there. Also, one of my sardines had a fried-onion necklace which was very, very cute. Had a glass of white wine, too.

I wanted to offer the woman next to me a sardine ’cause she was solo, too, but I wondered if that was too Californian of me?

Ate a Stick With Me Sweets chocolate for dessert — I had stopped by the other day to get chocolates for my husband Blaine — sorry, there are only four out of six left!

Thursday, July 11
Tour of the Google cafeterias with Mike. He was like, “This is the vegetarian floor, this is the place where the sushi chef comes, these are the baristas I like in this section,” but then we got a coffee from another barista in a different section. A free cortado! Free scrambled eggs and turkey bacon — why?!? I don’t like turkey bacon and I didn’t understand why it was there, but I ate it because I was so hungry. My friend likes it, so he ate a whole pile.

I found myself at Prune again, meeting Courtney Storer from Jon and Vinny’s. We never get to hang in L.A., so this was a real treat. But Prune was not open and we went to Altro Paradiso, where we sat outside and had a moody, rainy-day meal. It was perfect.

We ate the arancini, those were very good; prosciutto di Parma, also very good; swordfish, pretty good; the tomato salad, that was okay; and the fennel salad. I did not like the fennel salad. I know the chef, Ignacio, likes to do these monochromatic salads, and this one just felt like a little bit of a miss to me. But we had a really good spritz there. I like all kinds of spritzes.

After, I walked straight over to Big Gay Ice Cream with my friend Bryan, who is one of the owners. He was getting pints for our party that night, a pie-party contest with Aperol spritzes! I ordered chicken for 40 people as my contribution, and Pies ’n’ Thighs came THROUGH. Biscuits, too! I loved taking a car with huge containers of fried chicken! (I’ve probably been every time I’m here. One of my best friends, Scarlett, took me a couple times — she doesn’t live here anymore, but now I have other friends to go with.)

We judged the pies and crowned the winner and ate chicken and pie and ice cream. My fave was the fluffernutter. I love Bryan. We had tooooo much fun together and laughed a lot.

Friday, July 12
Balthazar breakfast with my friend Amber. Buckwheat crêpe with ham and cheese. It was the first time I’d been there. I thought it was okay. Wasn’t the best thing. Wasn’t the worst thing. Coffee was kind of bad.

Lunch with Alison Roman at Frenchette! What a complete treat! We had the bread and butter, oysters with tiny sausages, morel omelette and fries, chicken with more ’shrooms, and watercress-and-little-gem salad. Another spritz! The Spritzette. Not made with Aperol, extremely delicious. I liked the bitterness of it. I don’t drink very much, and if I’m going to drink cocktails, it’ll probably be salty or bitter.

Also, chocolate mousse! Espresso with the saltiest sparkling water — really a perfect pairing altogether.

Arrived in Brooklyn early so as not to be late for the big meal I’d been waiting for, Win Son! I am so endeared to places like this, a place that if it was at home I would visit weekly. I was with my friend Eric and his girlfriend, who love the place a lot.

We had almost everything. We got the turnip cakes, pork buns, pea shoots, fried eggplant, clams and basil — oh my God, the clams and basil. Wow, that was a totally crazy, delicious bowl of food. It was really spectacular. The lu rou fan, Nutritious sandwich, the beef roll, and the zha jiang mian, and that’s what we ate, which was a lot!

I got a drink that was also kind of bitter, the Taiwan Beer Amer. They said it was an underrated, underordered drink, and I said, “Great,” because I love an underdog. It was sour and bitter like a Taiwanese shandy. It was so fucking good.

Saturday, July 13
Trekked to Abraço for one last coffee. I also got a berry-filled buckle, which was so great.

I’d really like to open a place like it in my neighborhood. It’s both very welcoming and has really good energy. They have a good product, but it’s not like they’re thinking about it too much. It’s very effortless, but at the same time they just don’t tolerate any kind of bullshit. They’re not doing you any favors and I fucking love places like that, where it’s just kind of like, “Everybody’s equal in this space.” Liz treats everyone with kindness, and they work so hard and one of them is always there. It’s hard to find a place like that. Everyone wants to expand and make these like big concepts and have multiple stores, and, for better or worse, Liz and Jamie are there all the time.

I was still full from dinner, but I decided on breakfast at Kopitiam. I ate there with a customer of mine, Vishnu, who was in New York to film a movie. We had the kaya butter toast, the nasi lemak, water spinach, and the pan mee, these flat, hand-pulled noodles with anchovy-brothy soup that was good.

Then we went to the Happy Family Night Market, which was during the day, just for Burrow. I hadn’t been able to go to Burrow because I forgot they’re closed on weekends, and I really wanted to get cookies from them because I’m working on a cookie concept. And then I happened to see they were at the festival, and I was like, Oh God, totally saved. I gotta go get some cookies. I love the way they package them. Also, we got to see this film about mangoes — it was kind of really on-brand fruit-wise for me — and we had mango soda water while watching.

I was headed back to L.A., so I ate airport pizza in JFK’s American terminal. A slice of grandma and a slice of pepperoni. It was not good — the grandma slice was okay, but it was very soggy and heavy. I ate half of each slice and regretted it. I don’t know if this is a miscommunication, but I also got a Corona from them and they said it was fine for me to walk to my terminal with the beer? I then purchased and chugged a Zico because I felt borderline dehydrated.

The plane options being what they were, I ate a handful of grapes and some crackers. I had a banana muffin from Burro, too. It was amazing. Pretty sure it had very dark chocolate chips. These are special muffins. The way they make them is different. It was not as butter-heavy. The crumb of it is more brioche-y.

Returned home to pesto made by Blaine. He made it with a bunch of different basils from our garden, which is something he’s never done before: opal basil and lemon basil and African basil. It was kind of interesting and spicy-tasting. The lemon basil really made an impact flavor-wise. Also, some extra-toasted pine nuts on top.

More Grub Street Diets

See All


Eat like the experts.
Sign up for the Grub Street newsletter.
Terms & Privacy Notice By submitting your email, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Notice and to receive email correspondence from us.

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

KFC said online ordering through its app had doubled “year on year for the last five years”.

“These figures have led KFC to look at how it can make its service quicker, easier and more convenient,” a company statement said.

The restaurant chain said it was a pilot project and a “new concept” in the fast-food industry.

Those using the new drive-through operation will be able to order and pay for a meal with the KFC smartphone app or website before arriving at the site.

Customers will need to enter a four-digit code – generated by the smartphone app – on a touchscreen receiver, which will “send their order to the kitchen where it is freshly prepared, ready for collection”.

For those who prefer to order meals face-to-face, the operation will include “two traditional order and payment lanes”, alongside the three app- and website-order lanes.

KFC said it had invested about $1.5 million in the new concept, which was part of a wider trend affecting the company in Australia – including use of its app and “Alexa voice ordering”.

Kristi Woolrych, of KFC Australia, said the project was an example of the company’s commitment to innovation.

Ms Woolrych said the company aimed to sell food in “the most convenient way”.

Construction on the project started in late June. It will open in early November.

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Augustine’s strawberry-rhubarb trifle with basil cake. Photo: Liz Clayman

Maybe it’s just a side effect of The Great British Bake Off mania, but British desserts have made an unexpected return to menus around the city. “If you look at the classic desserts of England, they’re extremely comforting and I think they’re very traditional in the way that they’re designed for the home cook,” says British-born chef Jess Shadbolt of King, where an Eton Mess was recently added to the menu. “Nostalgia drives so much of our love and appreciation for food.” That nostalgia has inspired a sticky toffee pudding that’s sending diners into sugary nirvana, cherries jubilee set aflame tableside uptown, and Victorian sponges that the Mother of Europe herself would be head over heels for — all of them a bit elevated but nonetheless simple and comforting. “I definitely think that there should be more British desserts on menus,” Shadbolt adds. “I, for one, believe in them.” Below, a guide to all the British desserts worth ordering right now.

Strawberry-Rhubarb Trifle
Where: Augustine
How Much: $11
As far as British desserts go, trifles are pretty old hat, but leave it to Augustine to give the dessert a new coat of paint. The restaurant now serves a version of the trifle that starts with a sweet, egg-based pastry cream, followed by a layer of rhubarb compote, cubes of verdant basil cake, toasted marcona almonds, strawberries, whipped cream, and dehydrated strawberry powder.

Citrus Posset
Where: Cherry Point
How Much: $10
How do you follow up one too many old-fashioneds and a 70-day dry-aged steak for two? With a very simple, very light dessert. At Brooklyn’s Cherry Point, run by British-born chef Ed Szymanski, that dessert is a citrus posset featuring Cara Cara orange supremes. The original posset featured cream curdled with liqueur, but today’s possets are more akin to nice custards featuring thickened cream. Cherry Point sweetens its version with sugar and vanilla, then allows it to set in the fridge before arriving tableside with crunchy Earl Grey meringue shards on top. It’s the culinary equivalent of cooling down after a particularly hard-core workout.

Lemon Pudding Cake
Where: Simon & the Whale
How Much: $16
Pastry chef Zoe Kanan recently added a lemon pudding cake to the menu that features a pudding base and an egg-white-based cake on top. (The pudding is steamed as the cake rises to the top.) Each spoonful is a combination of light and airy cake mixed with a citrus bomb that Kanan says will “make you sit up straight” thanks to the addition of lemon juice, oil, and zest.

The sticky toffee pudding from Crown Shy features a syrup-soaked date cake. Photo: Melissa Hom

Sticky Toffee Pudding for Two
Where: Crown Shy
How Much: $18
The sticky toffee pudding at Crown Shy, just one part of the restaurant’s truly impressive dessert menu, is a master class in decadence. Pastry chef Renata Ameni starts by making a date cake and soaking it in an apple-cider-caramel soak to keep it moist and drizzles it with syrup made with muscovado sugar, which is just shy of pure molasses. The cake is topped with smoked candied pecans and brown butter and then served with a scoop of Granny Smith–apple sorbet that cuts right through the heaviest part of the pudding. If that sounds like a bit much, Ameni recently started selling a small to-go version of the dish at lunch time.

Banoffee Tarte Tatin for Two
Where: The Clocktower
How Much: $25
At this British-leaning Stephen Starr spot, the classic banoffee pie with banana, cream, and toffee layered over a cookie crumble goes decidedly Continental. Pastry chef Mark Henning has taken a page out of the French playbook and stacked layers of caramelized bananas over puff pastry plus a scoop of hazelnut ice cream, drizzling the final result with toffee syrup.

Cherries Jubilee
Where: The Grill
How Much: $15
Yes, a French chef — Auguste Escoffier — invented cherries jubilee, but he did it to celebrate Queen Victoria. The folks at The Grill are similarly taken, it seems, and their version of the dish features sweet cherries, orange-vanilla cherry syrup, and a splash of bourbon set aflame in beautiful, highly Instagrammable fashion and then poured over a couple scoops of candied-almond ice cream.

The slightly savory Eton Mess from LaLou. Photo: Melissa Hom

Eton Mess
Where: King and LaLou
How Much: $13 and $11
Anyone can make an Eton Mess: strawberries, meringue, and whipped cream. For this most classic take, King is your best bet. (“It exemplifies simple deliciousness,” says Shadbolt of her version.) But for a take that goes one step further, head to the recently opened LaLou. Like King, Chef Ashley Rath uses whipped cream instead of butter-fat-heavy double cream and mixes it with chunks of vanilla meringue. Both sit like a cloud over a handful of locally grown strawberries macerated with balsamic vinegar and black pepper to savory effect and then served in a coupe glass.

Pound Cake
Where: Loring Place
How Much: $16
Pastry chef Diana Valenzuela makes over the classic pound cake by substituting whipped cream for butter and then adding the eggs, flour, and sugar for a cake that’s so airy and delicate that it might float away. Luckily, there are fresh blueberries and cherries plus a scoop of fennel-seed ice cream to keep it firmly grounded.

Eat like the experts.
Sign up for the Grub Street newsletter.
Terms & Privacy Notice By submitting your email, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Notice and to receive email correspondence from us.

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Curry Up Now is celebrating the Grand Opening of its first Atlanta area location at 1575 Church Street in Decatur on Tuesday, 7/30. The first 150 guests in line at 11:30 a.m. will receive a free burrito, bowl, or samosa, and all day long guests can enjoy 50% off orders and live entertainment from Punjabi Bhangra dancers and henna artists.

The Award-Winning Indian Fast Casual, Which Has Four Additional ATL Stores In The Works, Will Celebrate With FREE Food To First 150 Customers, 50% Off the Rest of the Day, & Live Entertainment

Atlanta, GA  (RestaurantNews.com)  Curry Up Now, the award-winning Indian fast casual and transplant from the San Francisco Bay Area, will celebrate the Grand Opening of its first Atlanta area outpost at 1575 Church Street in Decatur on Tuesday, July 30 from 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. The restaurant, which is best known for its iconic Tikka Masala Burritos, Deconstructed Samosas, Indian street food and more, will celebrate by offering a complimentary bowl, samosa, or burrito to the first 150 guests in line, 50% off all orders for the rest of the day, and live entertainment from Punjabi Bhangra dancers and henna artists. Curry Up Now will open at least four more locations in Atlanta and is currently seeking real estate options throughout the metro area.

“We’ve been eagerly waiting to open our doors and finally bring Curry Up Now’s unique and innovative Indian eats to Atlanta,” said Atlanta franchisee Hemant Suri. “Decatur is known for its impressive and ever-growing food scene, which is why we wanted to introduce Curry Up Now to this area. We think that it’s going to be a welcome addition and couldn’t be more excited to celebrate our Grand Opening with the community of Decatur.”

Curry Up Now began as a food truck in Northern California in 2009. Founded by husband and wife duo Akash and Rana Kapoor and ably supported by co-founder and Senior VP of Operations Amir Hosseini, the innovative concept took off in the San Francisco Bay Area market and quickly expanded to include six corporate brick-and-mortar locations, several food trucks, and two globally-inspired craft cocktail bars, Mortar & Pestle. The Decatur location will be the first outside of Curry Up Now’s home state and will include all of the brand’s iconic Indian dishes that are presented in friendly, easily recognizable formats that can be adapted to meet the needs of vegan and gluten-free guests.

“We want to enter Atlanta with a bang, which is why we are celebrating with a Grand Opening that all can enjoy,” said Akash Kapoor, Founder & CEO of Curry Up Now. “This opening is only the beginning, but we have full confidence in the Atlanta group to grow the Curry Up Now brand and bring the long-awaited Tikka Masala and Hella Vegan Burritos, Sexy Fries, Naughty Naan, and Indian street snacks to the area. Our franchisees are about to break ground on our second location in Reynoldstown and can’t wait to open the third Atlanta location in Midtown, which will also house our eclectic craft cocktail bar, Mortar & Pestle.”

The Decatur location will be open Sunday to Thursday from 11:00 a.m to 10:00 p.m., and until 11:00 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Catering and takeout will be available, and guests are invited to order ahead using the Curry Up Now mobile app. For more information, call 470-343-2911, visit www.curryupnow.com, and follow @CurryUpNow on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

About Curry Up Now

Curry Up Now was established in 2009 by Akash Kapoor and his wife Rana, and ably supported by co-founder and now Senior VP of Operations, Amir Hosseini. The concept, which is known for its innovative spin on traditional Indian cuisine, has been recognized in publications such as Zagat: ‘5 Hottest Fast-Casual Chains,’ EATER SF: ‘SF’s Best Indian Restaurants,’ 7×7: ‘100 Things To Eat Before You Die,’ QSR: ‘40 Under 40,’ Fast Casual: ‘Top 100’ Movers & Shakers, Nation’s Restaurant News: ‘2018 Breakout Brand,’ and International Council of Shopping Centers: ‘Hot Food & Beverage Chain.’ Curry Up Now currently operates six brick-and-mortars and three food trucks in California’s Bay Area, and has both corporate and franchised units in development across California, New Jersey, Colorado, Utah, and Atlanta, GA. For more information about Curry Up Now, visit www.curryupnow.com. To learn more about franchising opportunities with Curry Up Now, visit http://go.fransmart.com/CurryUpNowApply.

Media Contact:
Ajenda Public Relations
Kathryn Kelly
Kathryn@ajendapr.com
714-421-8117

Jenna Satariano
Jenna@ajendapr.com
562-761-2095


Source
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Skills & know how

As well as helping you decide what to cook we can also help you to cook it. From tips on cookery techniques to facts and information about health and nutrition, we’ve a wealth of foodie know how for you to explore.

See our how to section…

About BBC Good Food

We are the UK’s number one food brand. Whether you’re looking for healthy recipes and guides, family projects and meal plans, the latest gadget reviews, foodie travel inspiration or just the perfect recipe for dinner tonight, we’re here to help.

Our recipes

All our recipes are tested thoroughly by us to make sure they’re suitable for your kitchen at home. We know many of you are concerned about healthy eating, so we send them to a qualified nutritionist for thorough analysis too.

Start browsing our recipes now

Tell us what you think…

Love the new look or think we’ve missed the mark? We want to hear your thoughts – good and bad – to make sure we make the new website as useful as possible.

Get in touch

Magazine

Subscribe to BBC Good Food magazine and get triple-tested recipes delivered to your door, every month.

Order today!

On TV

See your favourite chefs on Sky Channel 133, BT 313 and find their recipes at goodfoodchannel.co.uk

Follow us

Join the BBC Good Food community by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and Google Plus.

Find out more here

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Restaurants said they often get blamed for issues with food delivery even if it’s not their fault.

Mr Agi said customer refund requests take up time for the restaurant chain which turned over around $10 million last year.

He said Deliveroo is particularly difficult as refund requests are sent through to restaurants which are required to rebut the claims or it will be charged for the refund.

A spokesperson for Deliveroo denied its processes are difficult for business owners.

“When things go wrong with an order, we have a robust and transparent process to ensure we review and assess each claim, and provide a resolution that’s fair and reasonable to all,” a Deliveroo spokesperson said.

“Our restaurant partners are not responsible for compensating the customer on claims that are outside of their control. For instance, if the issue is linked to the delivery of the food, or an aspect of the order which is impacted by the delivery process.”

It’s tough all round — everyone is feeling it.

Steve Agi

Uber Eats said restaurants could contact the platform’s support system with any concerns around issues with delivery that happen after an order leaves the store.

“We also have automated and real-time systems in place to flag issues with orders placed through the app so we can follow up with the relevant restaurant or delivery partner to understand what has occurred,” a spokesperson said.

Tough decisions necessary

At the same time, insolvency practitioners warn companies must make tough decisions about whether to use these platforms, as margins in the hospitality sector are tightening.

“The question really is, are restaurants layering on further costs in order to service the delivery market?” Jirsch Sutherland partner Andrew Spring said.

Uber Eats delivers an order from Biggie Smalls to another hungry stay at home diner.Credit:Kristoffer Paulsen

Mr Spring warned this week that restaurants are facing a potent cocktail of high rents, increased competition and labor costs. Brand differentiation and cost tracking is key to surviving in this environment, he said.

According to ASIC insolvency data, in the 2017-2018 financial year 952 food and accommodation services businesses went into external administration — an increase from 803 businesses the year before.

Loading

Between July 2018 and May 2019, 975 businesses in this sector have already called in the administrators.

The number of wind-up applications across the broader economy was up 26 per cent this past financial year to 3,794, according to analysis from Prushka Fast Debt Recovery.

Prushka chief Roger Mendelson warned these numbers indicate this increase is a sign of more general financial stress across business sectors.

“A spike like this is generally a sign of increasing financial stress in the sector and is not necessarily representative of the entire scope of insolvent businesses,” Mr Mendelson said.

Mr Spring said hospitality owners must “understand where they make their money – on profit, not just their sales”.

Over the past two years the commissions charged by food delivery platforms has been a key point of contention for small businesses. The startups have argued that it’s worth it for businesses because of order volumes.

Companies like Burger Love have seen significant online order volumes over the years and have been able to grow significantly over this time.

However, Mr Agi said it was tough across the whole food industry, with commercial rents also a pain point.

Most Viewed in Business

Loading

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
New Jersey and New York City-metropolitan area restaurant professionals are invited to learn the best restaurant marketing ideas for 2019 and beyond during Modern Restaurant Management (MRM) magazine’s first in-person event on Monday, July 22. 

Space is limited and the spots are flling fast. To register for MRM Engage: “The 19 Best Restaurant Marketing Ideas for 2019,” click here or email bcastiglia@modernrestaurantmanagement.com.

“We are very excited to launch this series and have put together an engaging program filled with takeaway actionable marketing tips for restaurants,” said MRM Executive Editor Barbara Castiglia. “We will discuss NAPs and apps, social media, trends, delivery and more. Attendees will have an opportunity to meet with experts as well as take home giveaways from companies such as 3M and more. 

The presentation is based on one of MRM’s most successful articles and topics will include:

  • Guest Acquisition

  • Guest Retention

  • Revenue Optimization 

Attendees will be able to savor gourmet coffee from event sponsor RGM Coffee and light refreshments from new local culinary hotspot Mandara Ristorante as they engage with industry experts and colleagues one-on-one in a relaxed, business-casual atmosphere. 

The free event will take place from 4 to 6 p.m. at Agency Network,  located in Fairfield, New Jersey, approximately 25 miles from New York City. The Essex County location is in close proximity to Routes 46, 23, 80, 3, 280 and 287 as well as the Lincoln Tunnel, New Jersey Turnpike and Garden State Parkway.  Free on-site parking is provided. 

“We view hosting seminars as a natural way of expanding the MRM brand while keeping to our mission of providing information that enables restaurateurs to make decisions that help them operate in a more efficient manner,” added Castiglia. “We were greatly inspired by the number of online restaurant forums where real-life restaurant issues are discussed and advice is freely shared and wanted to create a similar feel at in-person event. We hope to see you on Monday afternoon.”

Source

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview