Loading...

Follow Dana Manciagli | Career Coaching and Speaking on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Clean Up Your Social Media for Future Employers 

While conducting your job search, it is imperative to set yourself up for success. Just as you want to know all that you can about your potential new employers, they are also eager to learn about who you are. One way for them to find out more about you is your public social media accounts.  

A 2018 survey done by CareerBuilder, showed that 70% of employers screen job candidates through their social media, while 43% of employers use social media to check out current employees. I worked with Brent Scott at Norton & LifeLock to compile some tips and tricks on where to look, what to change, and how to improve your professional social media presence.  

Start with Google   

Googling yourself is important as it will most likely be the first thing employers do once they know your full name, gender and age. If you think you have a private identity online, think again. As you scroll through page one of Google, see what social media accounts appear under your name and what other information is listed underneath.  

For example, if your Twitter name is @jerrylovesbeer that will show up next to Twitter. If your Facebook page is public your profile will also show up on page one as well as Instagram and so on. We recommend changing your usernames if they are anything other than your name. While being fun and funny is okay, it is important to ensure that you are being painted in a good light.  

Scrub Your Social Media  

While scanning through your social media, be on the hunt for content that might be related to drugs, alcohol, politics, religion, or anything disrespectful or degrading. Employers will be looking for how you interact with others, how you portray yourself, and what kinds of things are a main focus in your life. If your Instagram is public, go through your pictures and captions to make sure nothing is offensive, risqué, or inappropriate. Delete anything you wouldn’t want them, or your grandmother, to see.  

Be sure to review your LinkedIn posts, Facebook posts, Twitter tweets, and Instagram photos.  

If you want to keep your pictures but make them hidden from the public, Instagram has an archive feature that allows you to do just that. Make sure to screen comments as well. If your friends are writing swear words or telling stories about you in the comments, it may be important to shut those down, since they can be seen by other people.  

Update Yourself Online  

When you start the job search, it is essential that your online personal information matches what your future employer knows about you. Of course, not everything has to be disclosed, but the basic information should always be the same.  

Update your LinkedIn profile accordingly to make sure your page mirrors your résumé without any alarming questions. Keep your primary e–mail public and always have an appropriate profile photo. If you use other social media accounts as job hunting tools, take the time to curate your profile to accurately represent you and what you are looking for in the professional world.  

In summary, the same CareerBuilder survey referenced above also found that 54% of employers found content on social media that caused them not to hire a candidate. With the number of employers and recruiters actively using social media as a tool to screen candidates increasing, it’s important to educate everyone conducting job searches today—from college students just entering the job force to executives changing jobs or careers—about the importance of protecting and cleaning up their digital presence.  

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive online job search system available! 

The post Clean Up Your Social Media for Future Employers appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Three Steps to Building a Successful Job Search Plan

Looking for a job isn’t what it used to be. Today’s job search is an activity that requires organization, planning and scheduling. In fact, one of the most important building blocks of any job search is effective planning. The challenge is that while serious job searchers are committed to the job search, they often have trouble with the job search schedule and can’t get organized or find the time.   

In order to execute a job search plan successfully, it is vital to commit to three actions:  

  1. Block out a certain amount of time 
  2. Complete a set of activities in the right order  
  3. Track your progress every day   
Block Out Time  

This does not mean that you have to schedule time each and every day for job searching; do what is feasible in your life and current workload. However, it is important to commit to, and stick with, how much time you will spend on your job search. The more effort and time you can spend on job search will likely result in better outcomes faster!  

Carve out specific blocks of time for job search activities and put them on your calendar. Whatever the commitment is, make appointments with yourself in your calendar. Whether you use online schedulers or a paper calendar, be sure you stick to your schedule.   

Complete a Set of Activities  

Specific activities are the heart of your job search. They include things like researching potential companies and submitting applications, and they have to be repeated over and over until you land that new job. The specific activities and their order include:  

  • Preparing to Job Search – This includes organizing your technology, job search tools, communication methods, and documents.  
  • Researching – You should be reading up on industry news, conducing internet or library searches, researching potential companies, and preparing for interviews.  
  • Networking – Find out if there are industry events or external meetings to attend, or groups you can join. Spend time on LinkedIn connecting with old colleagues or new ones.  
  • Applying or Cold Calling – Build and refine your network list, contact your network list via phone or e-mail, or send out ‘candidate packets.’  
  • Following Up – Be sure to follow up by sending thank you notes (via e-mail) or contact hiring managers. You actually need to follow up three times after making the initial contact.  
  • Rehearsing – Build and refine interview questions, draft scripts for phone calls, write draft e-mails before sending. Practice interviews by role playing.  

For the best results, specify which activity you will do in a given hour and stay in that activity. When you schedule an hour or two–hour block don’t just say ‘job search.’ Pick a particular activity to focus on and write it down. For example, you might say, ‘build my professional network list’ or ‘update my LinkedIn profile.’ Then that’s what you do for that blocked off amount of time.  

Track Your Progress  

Regular tracking of job search activities reinforces that job search is your number one priority. It prevents wasting time and ensures effectiveness and efficiency. It will also help to accelerate the speed in which you get to the finish line, which is landing your new job.  

Be comfortable with the type of calendar technology you use. Whatever you normally use for calendaring, use that for job search. Document every activity you do and what you need to do to follow up. For example, if you go to an evening network event where you’ve collecting business cards, you need to follow up with these contacts the next morning and that activity goes on the calendar. The calendar serves as a record of all the things you have done and all the things yet to do.  

In summary, finding a new job should be treated like a job, which means committing to a schedule and completing the activities that make up a successful job search. By getting into a routine to conduct the job search steps of preparation, research, networking, and completing applications, you can avoid falling back in that old job search pattern of random tasks and frustration. 

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive online job search system available! 

The post Three Steps to Building a Successful Job Search Plan appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

8 Tips to Up Your Small Talk Game 

Smartphones help us avoid face-to-face conversations. While technology can help people connect with one another, face-to-face conversations are still as important as ever. One often overlooked, but essential, conversation style is small talk. While it isn’t always easy, people really can improve and avoid the awkward silences.  

 I reached out across the Atlantic Ocean to Barbara Davidson in the United Kingdom and she shared the following about the importance of getting better at making small talk. “Small talk is a fact of life. And while some people are naturals, the rest of us struggle to know what to say during casual chit-chat. Those awkward silences grow painful, and leave you feeling like a social failure!” 

So, the next time your mind runs blank, consider following these pointed techniques to keep yourself engaged and present in conversational small talk.  

  1. Make eye contact. This helps build a sense of trust, which makes it easier to talk to each other. Even if you’re shy, try looking your small talk partner in the eye, and varying your look to their other eye and mouth every few moments.  
  2. Come up with alternative ways to ask classic questions. Rather than saying: “What do you do for a living?” say something like: “What’s keeping you busy these days?” 
  3. Look for non-confrontational conversation topics and stay away from hot-button topics like politics or religion. Think FORD: Family, Occupation, Recreation and Dreams. Try to keep your questions to those four general topics.  
  4. Listen carefully and ask for details about what the other person is saying instead of searching your mind for the next new topic to bring up. Conversations are easier when you ramp-up the empathy as you listen. 
  5. Repeat or restate something the other person has said in your own words. This indicates you are paying attention and engaged in what the other person is saying.  
  6. Communicate with positive body language. Be sure to face the other person, keep your arms uncrossed and your sides, and lean in slightly.  
  7. Discuss where you are. Obviously, you are both in the same physical space; use this as a conversation starter and ask about any music that might be playing or food they are serving.  
  8. Exit gracefully. When the encounter is over, incorporate the phrase “I need.” This places the burden on ending the conversation on you and shows you aren’t leaving because of boredom.  

Barbara Davidson’s full article and accompanying infographic further details the tips to help improve your small talk game.  

Small talk is a learned skill like any other. Learning how to do it better can have positive benefits for your career, social life, and the way you feel inside. Once you’ve mastered these tips you will be more comfortable with small talk and can leave talking about the weather to the weather reporters.  

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive job search system available! 

The post 8 Tips to Up Your Small Talk Game appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Embracing Employment Gaps and Career Changes in Your Résumé

Working for one company for a long period of time or having gaps in employment history does not have to be a deal breaker when seeking a new job or career change. People move in and out of the workforce for many reasons. It does not mean you can’t jump back in or leap over to another employer; just make sure that your résumé tells the story.   

I recently held a Job Search Master Class® webinar where I received a lot of questions from attendees about how to handle gaps in their résumé and how to diversify their experience if they worked for the same employer for many years. So, I know it’s on the minds of many job seekers today.  

To start, it’s important to note that all résumés should follow three major principles of résumé excellence. While these principles apply to all résumés, those re-entering the workforce or seeking to break out of a long career trajectory, will need them to rise to the top.  

  • Searchability—Optimize the key word search, to be found by the robots (e.g., applicant tracking systems, email systems, job boards, résumé databases, social media and web search engines). Find out the key words and key phrases that trigger you to be found in your desired job area.  
  • Easy to Read—Ensure the résumé is well-formatted online and in print so it reads clearly. Make sure you have a lot of white space, bulleted text, and easy-to-scan headings. Use a limited number of fonts-no more than two.  
  • Quantitative—Insert numbers or percentages and quantify experiences wherever possible. Quantification can mean how close you were to top managers or what percentage of code you wrote this year over last year.  

The following highlights scenarios for job seekers who have had the same employer for many years or have gaps in employment.  

Scenario:  Same employer for many years   
  • When the majority of your job experience comes from one employer, break out your experiences and job responsibilities as separate activities. 
  • If you changed positions within the company, list the different titles and break out experiences as bullets underneath.  
  • One of my clients sought a new job after 22 years with the same employer. She landed a CFO position at a new company because she was able to represent her years of experience independently. She broke out her specific skills and used the important keywords for her new job on her résumé.  
Scenario: Gaps in employment   
  • Gaps in employment history are very common. I work with many military spouses who have huge gaps because they have been overseas and could not work. Sometimes, they have been raising kids or caring for older parents for years.  
  • Taking time off from work to pursue education creates an employment gap. There are many life circumstances that lead to gaps.  
  • Treat the reason for your gap as the job description. Describe the activities you did as caregiving for a child or parent, returning to school for a graduate degree, or travelling the world. Be sure to list any and all volunteer work, whether it’s helping out at your child’s school, working with seniors at community center, or volunteering at the library or food bank; volunteer tasks can translate well to job qualifications.  
  • I recently helped a client who raised three children for 18 years and who didn’t think she would qualify for a job. We included the skills she has as a result of caregiving, volunteering and her hobby of photography on her résumé. She landed a job as a college recruiter for a big company, where she didn’t need technical skills to start.  
  • You don’t need to call them gaps, either! 

There are many jobs and positions where your background will shine, and where your skills and experience are perfect for the right employer. Create a résumé that shows how you embrace your life chapters and aren’t afraid to get back into the workforce or start over at a new company.  

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive job search system available! 

The post Embracing Employment Gaps and Career Changes in Your Résumé appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Mom’s Thank-you Notes and Follow Up

Turns out, your mother was right! Sending thank you notes is the right thing to do. However, in the job search process it is also required. The benefit in conducting good job search follow up is that it shows great persistence and professionalism. You can use the opportunity to expand, reinforce or clarify something that you discussed in the interview. Finally, it prevents the interviewers from forgetting about you (which they may) and it shows that you really want their job. 

As a former hiring manager, I can tell you, with certainty, that one of the weakest parts of candidates’ job search steps is their follow up. So, now that you know better, there’s no excuse for inadequate follow up.  

Start by sending your thank you note via e-mail 24-48 hours after your interview. You want the interview to be fresh in your mind and in the company’s! Address a note to each person with whom you met; no group e-mails. Be sure you have spelled everyone’s names correctly and write every e-mail with perfect grammar and a full signature with your full name, phone number and e-mail.  

The Flow of a Well-crafted Thank You Note Includes: 
  • Thank them for the opportunity to meet and acknowledge that they took the time to do so. 
  • Using bullets, highlight between one and three reasons why you’re the best fit for the role. Your goal here is to remind them why you would be a good fit.  
  • Close by hitting these three points: Express your interest, commit to following up again within a specified timeframe (ideally in a week), and thank them, again, for their time and consideration.  

Now, you cannot sit back and wait for a response. Unless and until you hear definitively about the job, you will send up to three follow up e-mails. Yes, three.  

Space them seven days apart. Each follow up note should begin with pleasantries, then contain a sentence explaining where you left off in your last communication with them. Something like: “You had indicated to me that you’d be making your final decision during the week of, and I just wanted to follow up to see where you are in that decision.” Then, rather than continue to pester them about when the decision will be made, take the opportunity to include something of value about you; mention training you just completed, discuss a deal you closed, or highlight a project you finished. Close the thank you note by indicating that you intend to follow up again in another week.  

3 Tricks to Great Follow Up: 
  1. Always appear gracious, positive, patient, and interested. Minimize the use of “I, me and my.” 
  2. When following up via e-mail, always attached the prior e-mail you are referring to.  
  3. Match your communications medium to the one the interviewer has been using; return e-mails with e-mails, but if they call you, return their call.  

Practice writing thank you note e–mails and get a friend to read them for feedback. It may not be second nature to send up to four thank you and follow up notes to a prospective employer, but this could be the difference between being forgotten and standing out.

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive job search system available! 

The post Mom’s Thank You Notes and Follow Up appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

7 Questions to Ask in Your Next Job Interview  

Ok, you landed an interview at one of your top companies to work for! Great job. Now, I’d like to share one of my tried and true interview tips before you get to the meeting—ask strong questions in the interview. Believe it or not, the questions you ask in an interview can help you OR knock you out of the running for the job.   

Before he became my client, Joseph had an interview with the hiring manager for a position he really wanted. He researched the company, re–read the job description, and brushed up on his top strengths and weaknesses. He was on time and did well during the interview…until the last 15 minutes. When the manager asked, “Joseph, what questions do you have for me?” he wasn’t prepared to answer this question and he sabotaged his odds of winning this job.  

When I started working with Joseph, I developed scenarios to get him thinking differently. These apply to anyone headed into a job interview.   

  • Scenario #1: Joseph didn’t have any questions prepared. Mistake! Solution #1: Prepare your questions, write them down, and bring them with you to the interview. As a matter of fact, show your interviewer that you have them written down and they will be impressed with your preparation.  
  • Scenario #2: Joseph asked, “What is the starting salary?” Mistake! Solution #2: Never talk salary, even in ranges. As a matter of fact, don’t ask anything financial in nature, such as benefits. Your mission is to get an offer in hand. Once you do, you can ask questions and possibly negotiate, but not before.  
  • Scenario #3: Joseph asked, “Is there a training program or structured on-boarding process?” Mistake! Solution #3: Think about the perception you are creating with your questions. In this case, the interviewer may think: “He needs hand-holding and may be too high maintenance for me. I need someone who knows how to do this.” If a training program is mentioned in the job description or on the company website, then it is appropriate to ask for more insights about the structure, length, etc.  
  • Scenario #4: Joseph asked, “What does your division or company do?” Really big mistake! Solution #4: It is still shocking how many job seekers ask this question. With the web, calling people you know, social media, and many other resources, there is no excuse for not knowing what a company does. Research what their department or division does, as well. Tip: One of my favorite resources is your local city’s Business Journal, both their online resources and the printed publication. Find your city’s resource here  

Ok, so what are good questions to ask in an interview? Below are my top 7 questions for you to ask in your next interview. You won’t get to all seven, and you need to pick the right questions for the right audience, so read carefully and choose the ones that are right for you.  

  1. I’m very self-motivated. How will you measure my success in this position after one full year?  
  2. The first 30 days are very important for me to meet as many team members as possible. How will you recommend I do that?  
  3. What are the top three skills or experiences you are looking for that may not be mentioned in the job description?  
  4. Of all the people who have worked for you, what are the characteristics of those who have stood out as great performers? 
  5. I have to admit I’m a perfectionist in some areas. What are the aspects of this position that absolutely require precision and attention to detail? 
  6. Of all the criteria you have outlined for this position, what are the top three in stack rank order?  
  7. The position we are discussing is something I am very excited about. Do I have your support to proceed to the next level of the hiring process? (This is called “going for the close” or “asking for the order” in sales.)  

As an experienced hiring manager and interviewer, I am impressed when a candidate brings out a piece of paper with their questions written out. It means they are prepared, thoughtful and thorough. It’s even better when they write down the answers I gave under each question! I know that’s the type of employee I want on my team and most hiring managers would feel the same.  

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive job search system available! 

The post 7 Questions to Ask in Your Next Job Interview appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Get Results from Career or Job Fairs! 

If you have ever been to a career or job fair, you know that standing out and making a good impression are keys to success. Following my basic, but important, rules of what to do before, during and after a career or job fair will prepare you for success and boost your confidence. And while job offers will not be made at the job fair, if you follow through with these steps, you could be on your way toward a successful interview at the company of your choice! 

Before the Career or Job Fair 
  • Map out your plan of attack.  
  • Secure a list of companies attending the job fair.  
  • Pick your top ten companies to target so you can move to those booths or tables at the beginning.  
  • Research; find positions you want on each company’s website and bring copies of the job descriptions to the fair! 

Script your answers to the two questions you be asked frequently: “Tell me about yourself” and “What are you looking for?” Prepare concise answers to each and be ready to give the recruiter a clear sense of your background and the specific positions you are targeting.  

At the Career or Job Fair  

Keep in mind that your main objective at the fair is to get the name, title and e-mail of the primary contact within the company who hires in your field.  

Arrive early! Walk around to get a feel for the layout and where each of your targeted employers is located. Decide with whom you want to speak and in what order. Approach the company table and introduce yourself with a strong handshake and eye contact. Pick up any of their literature, job listings and other material. Take notes on what you learn from the company representative. Show that you are alert, enthusiastic and confident. State your specific job goals and communicate how your goals fit with the needs of the company. 

If you created a personal business card, which I recommend, give it to the recruiter. Do not use a business card from your current employer with your work phone and e–mail. Be sure to collect business cards from the company representatives and write down everything you learn from each employer.  

If there is a company that you really want to work for, but they are not hiring for your field, approach the recruiter and ask: “Who should I contact in your company for a position in my field (e.g., computer programming)?” They might invite you to send your résumé to them and forward it.   

Before you leave, go back to the companies you really want to work for. Wait until the recruiter is free. Walk up and thank him or her for their time. This lasting impression is very important for future contact. Remember, they may be talking to 50 -100 people, and it is best if they can remember your name and face over all the other candidates!  

After the Career or Job Fair  

Connect with the company representatives you met 24 to 48 hours after the event! Send a thank you e-mail referencing your meeting at the fair. Examples: 

  • Here are the qualifications and experience I bring to the position…<3 bullet points.>  
  • I would appreciate the opportunity to speak to you further in an interview.  
  • I will e-mail you next week to arrange a time when we can further discuss how my skills can benefit your organization.   

Connect via LinkedIn by writing a personal connection message from your computer and not via the LinkedIn mobile app. Today, the app makes it very hard to write a professional connection request.  

Finally, after the event, be sure write down your notes about the day: whom you met, what you learned, additional research to be done, networking opportunities, etc. Keeping track of all this information will come in handy when you get the call to come in for an interview!  

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive job search system available! 

The post Get Results from Career or Job Fairs! appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Add Cold Calling Techniques to Land Your Career Move

Making cold calls on companies can give job seekers the chills! As a hiring manager and job search professional for over 30 years, I have yet to meet one job seeker who is comfortable making cold calls for jobs, sending e-mails to a perfect stranger, or corresponding with people they aren’t personally connected to. However, when done well, cold calling works and there’s no downside to it.  

By the way, today’s version of cold calling does NOT mean dialing for jobs! Do NOT pick up the phone and interrupt someone’s work day. Today’s job search cold calling is sending extremely well–done e-mails describing your credentials.  

Many of my clients tell me how hard it is to click the ‘connect’ button in LinkedIn, and they are not even talking to a real person yet! Imagine reaching out to someone who is in an executive position, and introducing yourself, and then asking if there are career opportunities to discuss. It’s just not easy, but it can produce results. Tony, a client of mine, learned to tackle cold calling like a champ. After working with me, he sent out 25 very well–done cold call solicitations. He got three requests for phone interviews. One landed in a face–to–face interview, resulting in a job offer.  

Cold calling is a long–established job search activity. And, like every other job search action, it should become a normal part of your job search to-do list. Recruiters, HR officers and senior executives are always on the lookout for great talent. Honestly, after making numerous cold calls you probably won’t get many responses. But that one person who gets back to you could change your career path forever.  

Here are three common scenarios when cold calling may be effective: 

  • You see a job advertised but don’t know anybody at that company. You don’t want to just apply because you know the odds are high your application will go into a black hole. But you want to win the job by networking! You can cold call someone to be your job advocate.   
  • You see a job advertised and you do know someone at that company remotely or via LinkedIn. They may not be the hiring manager but at least you have a connection. You only need to find one who will help you out! 
  • You know someone who works at a target company, based on your career goal, but you don’t know if there are any relevant positions. As a matter of fact, you don’t see any posted on their website, but you happen to know one person who works there.  

Making a cold call would work for all the above scenarios and others. Great, but how do you do it? Begin by following these three steps for making cold calls. 

  1. Start by writing great e-mails. If you know anybody at your target company, regardless of their position or level, contact them via e-mail. Use LinkedIn and other sources to find their e-mail address. Make sure you send a professionally written request through e-mail that they can forward to someone else in the company, if necessary. Always attach your credentials (cover letter and résumé). 
  2. Research and use social media. Before you start cold calling, go online and spend time researching the companies you are targeting. Try to find a contact name and e-mail within your desired department or division, rather than sending a cold call cover letter into human resources. Take accountability to research before you cold call.  
  3. Always be prepared before you write the cold call e-mail. What if you get a call back to have a conversation? Are you prepared to answer questions like “What kind of position are you looking for?” or do you have a scripted, concise response to “Tell me about yourself”?   

Making cold calls to land your ideal job is not going to be easy, but nothing ever is. As you get more comfortable with cold calling, be sure to incorporate it into your normal job search process. Remember to always be friendly, courteous and clear when making cold connections. The more precise and specific you are about why you are calling, the better the chances of them engaging with you. And with all job search activities, be prepared; write down what you want to say and have your goals in front of you.  

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive job search system available! 

The post Add Cold Calling Techniques to Land Your Career Move appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Why a Great Job Search Goal Will Get You Hired Faster

Developing a clear job search goal is a key step before you begin hunting for your next career move. It is important to know how to create a great job goal, not just a good one. Many job seekers out there are applying to positions without a clear sense as to what they want to do next. Others have what they think is a job goal, but it’s poorly defined.  

I recently met Pamela who sent her résumé to nine different job postings and got no results. After working with her, I discovered she had applied to be a project manager, a sales representative, and a business operations manager. And, while she may be qualified for all, she didn’t have a focus or a compelling story about any of them. The solution to this situation is that prior to applying to any position in the future, you have to develop your job search goal.  

Ineffective Job Search Goals  

Sometimes it helps to know what a job search goal is NOT. Here are real responses to the question: “What type of position are you looking for?” 

  • A challenging position where I can leverage my skills and where there’s an opportunity for growth. 
  • Something in the fashion business. I can do anything. I know I don’t want to do retail.  

Neither of these are acceptable goals. Let’s break them down.  

Saying you are looking for a “challenging position” is classic. This response has no specifics. Who would ever ask for a non-challenging position? When indicating that you want to “leverage my skills,” you need to understand—and this may come as a shock—the job search process isn’t about you. It’s about you fitting into an employer’s need. Avoid the “l-word,” “leverage” altogether. 

Where it mentions “opportunity for growth,” realize that there is opportunity in any company. You may want upward mobility but keep those desires to yourself. You don’t want to come across like you’re going to take this job and ask for a promotion in six months. The opportunity for growth is what you make of the position after you land it.  

Indicating that you are looking for “something in the fashion business” is too broad. You can state an industry, but an industry is not a job. Focus more on the function of the department versus the industry.  

One of the worst things you can say is, “I can do anything.” First, you can’t do everything. Second, it sends a signal of “I don’t know,” or “I’m desperate.” It shows you may lack focus and could be a high-risk hire. Finally, no one wants to hear what you don’t want to do.  

Great Job Search Goal Statement  

Ok, so how do you go about setting a solid job search goal? Here are two tricks to developing a great job goal statement:  

  1. Err on the very specific side. You can always edit it later. It is much harder to take a ‘squishy’ goal and try to get specific. 
  2. Read your stated goal to friends and family for input. See if they understand it the first time without any explanation.  

To create a great job search goal, you need to window shop your industry and narrow down your job goals. Window shopping means learning what the market is looking for, learning the current terminology and buzzwords, identifying the top skills, and listing out key words and phrases. Narrow down your job search goals by scouring the internet for possible functions, occupations and vocations. Look through job search websites (don’t apply, just read job descriptions). Print out 10 jobs that interest you and circle keywords they have in common. Read job descriptions in their entirety; identify the functions, occupations or tasks you could see yourself doing…every day.  

Fill in the blanks to craft your new job search goal: 

I’m seeking a <function> position in the <industry> with a <size> corporation in <city>.  

Now, let’s practice:   

  • Question:  Pamela, what type of role are you looking for? 
  • Pamela’s new answer:  Thank you for asking! I’m seeking a digital marketing manager position in the technology industry with a large company here in Chicago.   
  • Question:  Wow, great, and can you give me some company names you are targeting? 
  • Pamela:  Well, yes, <company>, <company> and <company>.  Do you know anyone at these companies who I may contact?   

See where this is going? The clearer and more prepared you are to engage with your network, recruiters and total strangers you meet on LinkedIn, the more engagement and results you will get. If you are actively searching today without a job search goal, STOP and go do the goal-setting work. You can do this! 

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive job search system available! 

The post Why a Great Job Search Goal Will Get You Hired Faster appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Side Hustles Ways to Thrive in Today’s Gig Economy

It’s no secret: side hustles are the newest norm in business today. From student debt and low retirement benefits to fear of job loss, many people of all ages are turning to entrepreneurial endeavors for peace of mind and extra cash. 

Forbes estimates that 57 million people earn money through the gig economy. Online platforms like Airbnb, Uber and Etsy make business start-up simple. However, what’s not simple is launching a business that yields dependable long-term revenue. According to the Washington Post, 85% of side-gig workers bring in less than $500 each month. 

According to business expert, author and international speaker, Marcos Jacober, making your side hustle thrive will be even more challenging in 2019. I recently spoke with Marcos who serves as CEO of Life Hacks Wealth and is also the founder of Airbtheboss. 

He provided insight on three ways to make your side hustle thrive this year. 

1 – Be Nimble and Current.

Because the gig marketplace is evolving and expanding, the shift is changing the rules of the game, Jacober said. In order to make money from a side hustle in 2019, it’s essential to have new strategies in place – part of the approach stems from asking the right questions before starting any new endeavor. He said, “The question you should ask yourself is not, ‘How can I get more gigs?’ rather, ‘How can this business run on cruise control?’”

2 – Leverage Your Resources. 

 In 2019, a successful side hustle will require you to leverage your abilities or resources, not your time, Jacober explained. “This strategy will allow you to have several side hustles going on simultaneously, and it should not require more money,” he said. Some gig platforms are better suited for this approach than others. For example, when it comes to ride sharing, platforms such as Uber and Lyft require you to spend time in the car, while other platforms, like Turo, allow you to leverage your resources and rent your car out to other drivers. 

3 – Provide Good Customer Service

According to Jacober, a successful side hustler must also provide exceptional service and enhance the customer experience in every way possible, including follow-up and real-time experience management.    

Jacober’s final piece of advice: “It’s crucial to realize that a side hustle can undoubtedly generate a lot of money, but it’s not a ‘get rich quick’ situation. Instead, it takes plenty of careful planning and preparation, and it also helps to get advice from the experts.” 

“It’s important to realize: for a successful side hustle, you need to actuallyhustle,” he said. “Being careful doesn’t mean being slow. Take action, work hard, set goals and check them off your to-do list.” 

Join Dana Manciagli’s Job Search Master Class® now and get the most comprehensive job search system available! 

#JSMC #careeradvice #jobsearchmasterclass #sidehustle #lifehackswealth #gigeconomy #airbtheboss  

The post 3 Ways to Thrive in Today’s Gig Economy appeared first on Job Search Master Class®.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview