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The winners for the 2019 Locus Awards have been announced. Here they are for the novel categories:

Locus Science Fiction Novel:

Locus Fantasy Novel:

Locus First Novel:

Locus Young Adult Book:

See the complete list of winners and nominees for all categories over on Locus.

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We are now rolling out version 5 of the Classics of Science Fiction list. Since 1987 how the lists were generated has changed with each new version. Version 5 is driven by a database and programs that allow us to add new citation sources on the fly. Hopefully, that means we won’t have to write new versions of the list generator in the future. But it does mean the list will automatically change when we add new data.

We have never claimed our lists of “classic science fiction” are the absolute best of all science fiction to read. Our goal has been to track how science fiction stories are remembered over time. Most stories are quickly forgotten. A few get remembered for years, and sometimes decades. Rare works are still read a century later. Collectively, we remember some stories, but that doesn’t mean that individuals don’t find stories that resonate overwhelmingly with their own unique reading tastes that don’t get recognition statistically.

In version 5 of the Classics of Science Fiction and Classics of Science Fiction Short Stories, almost everything is a hyperlink, and each column can be resorted by clicking on the heading label. There is also a build your own list where visitors can create custom lists. Titles and authors are linked to ISFDB.org, and from there you can follow links to other resources.

At the top of each list is the option to show the citations or turn them off. The citations are in order by year. If you study these lists and citations, you’ll see how stories are remembered and forgotten. If you are old enough, this might spur wistful memories.

We control the size of the generated lists by specifying the number of citations. For our classics lists we use 12 for books, and 8 for stories. These produce lists of around 100 titles, a size that seems to capture the most remembered stories. Stories we like to think of as classics. If you want fewer stories up the citation requirements, if you want more, lower them.

A fun thing to do with the custom list builder is to search for the most popular science fiction for the decade of your teen years. That tends to be everyone’s golden age of science fiction.

Our new URL is https://csfquery.com.

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The British Science Fiction Association has announced the winners of the BSFA Awards for works published in 2018.

In the Best Novel category the winner is Embers of War by Gareth L. Powell, (Titan). Our congrats to Gareth and all the nominees:

See the lists for all categories over on Locus. What do you think of this result?

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The winner of the 2019 Philip K. Dick Award for distinguished original science fiction paperback published for the first time during 2018 in the U.S.A. is: Theory of Bastards by Audrey Schulman (Europa). Special Citation was given to 84k by Claire North (Orbit).

The PKD Award was presented Friday, April 19, 2019 at Norwescon 42, in SeaTac, Washington.

Our congrats to the winners and all the nominees.

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The 2018 Kitschies winners have been announced. They are:

Red Tentacle: Circe Madeline Miller (Bloomsbury)
Golden Tentacle: Frankenstein in Baghdad by Ahmed Saadawi (Oneworld)

See Locus for the full details for all categories. Our congrats to Madeline Miller and Ahmed Saadawi and all the nominees.

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Star Wars: Episode IX – Teaser - YouTube

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Watch the Senate query experts on the need for a Space Force. This is a live feed as I type this, but when it ends, you can still watch it from the beginning.

Pentagon Officials Testify on Proposed Space Force - YouTube

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I never thought anyone’s performance could rival Heath Ledger, but, if this trailer is any indication, I could be disastrously wrong.

JOKER - Teaser Trailer - In Theaters October 4 - YouTube

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How do you make money on a product given away for free? That’s a problem all websites face, but I’m particularly worried about those that publish science fiction short stories. Let’s say you pay 10-cents a word to writers and offer 100,000 words of quality fiction to your readers each month. That’s $10,000 of overhead just for stories. Advertising won’t cover that. And even generous Patreon donors will tire quickly. What’s a publisher to do? Neil Clarke over at Clarkesworld brought this conundrum up on Twitter the other day and I’ve been thinking about it ever since.

I love reading science fiction short stories and would hate to see their publishers go out of business. Traditionally, short science fiction was distributed in printed magazines supported by subscriptions. After the internet websites began publishing short SF for free, which competed with the magazines. Their success has steadily grown as more and more awards are given to stories that are first published on the web, as well as seeing a greater percentage of these stories anthologized in the best-of-the-year volumes. It’s now a disadvantage to be published in print.

Magazines have declining revenues while websites struggle for any revenue. This can’t go on. A new monetizing model needs to be discovered.

Free-to-read stories help authors find fans and win awards, but at what cost? Making a profit from selling fiction has always been hard, but it is impossible when the price is free. If I was writing a science fiction story, I wouldn’t picture this in the future. Nor would I predict internet publishing failing and print publishing reviving.

Subscribing to the digital editions of the SF/F magazines seems to be the main hope at the moment. But too many readers still expect SF stories for free. A suggestion was made in the twitter thread that online publishers retain part of their content for exclusive eBook editions, but Clarke replied he doesn’t want to penalize those writers by hiding their stories. What’s needed is for readers to buy subscriptions and let all the stories be published on the net for free. A Zen koan. If a story is published on the net, readers who love it share it with friends. Being free helps a story find readers. But, can publishers find enough paying subscribers to support all the freeloaders?

There are two kinds of readers — casual ones who read short stories rarely, and dedicated ones who cherish short science fiction as a distinct art form. Subscribers will be the patrons of this art. The question is: Are there enough patrons out there to support SF magazines? Could original anthologies completely replace the periodicals? I hope short science fiction doesn’t become like the world of classical music where local symphonies must constantly beg for money from a dwindling patron base. There are really two problems here: declining readership and declining subscriptions.

Rocket Stack Rank regularly reviews 11 SF/F magazines, as well as a significant number of anthologies and other publishers of short SF. There are even more SF/F magazines out there that they don’t cover, just look at WWEnd’s list of over 60+ magazines that cover the SF/F/H genres. Magazines come and go, and whether or not they get to stay depends on making money. For example, Amazing Stories is publishing again. Steve Davidson is doing everything he can to resurrect that legendary title that’s gone out of business many times.

Magazines and websites need income to stay in existence, but finding a revenue stream in an era where everyone expects everything online for free is a big burden. I’m not sure the market can support 11+ magazines. I expect a big shake-out in the near future. Would more magazines be profitable if there was less competition?

I subscribe to 4 magazines (Asimov’s, Analog, Clarkesworld, and Lightspeed) because I get them for $2.99 a month each through Amazon. I do it this way because it’s so damn convenient. I can read these magazines on my phone or tablet. I can unsubscribe at any time so there’s no real commitment. I consider the $12 I spend each month as my way of supporting short science fiction. Most people think of patrons of the arts as rich folks who give thousands to their favorite orchestra or museum. $12 a month is my way of being a penny-ante patron of an obscure art form.

I would also subscribe to The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction if it offered a $2.99 a month subscription. I’d subscribe to other magazines if they offered $1.99 or $2.99 subs through Amazon. Some magazines offer individual issues for sale at Amazon, like Interzone for $4.99 each, and I’ll buy those when Rocket Stack Rank rates one of their stories highly.

For folks who don’t like Amazon, eBook editions of these magazines are available elsewhere.

It doesn’t bother me that two of the magazines I subscribe to offer their stories for free online. It’s easier to read them on my phone, but I like that the stories are there for free. When I find an outstanding tale, I enjoy telling my friends or blog about them, and having that link means there’s a greater chance of folks giving the story a try. I also want internet browsing to always be free.

The science fiction magazines will need several thousand subscribers to keep them going. Is this the ultimate solution to the problem? Can each genre magazine find at least 10,000 patrons? The other day Apple launched AppleNews+ which provides 300+ magazines for $10 a month. If it succeeds it might draw tens of millions of subscribers.

Introducing Apple News+ - YouTube

Unfortunately, none of those 300+ magazines are fiction magazines. The reason why I love subscribing to Spotify is it provides for all my music needs in one source. What if AppleNews+ provided for all my periodical needs? I have no idea if these 300 magazines will make money from AppleNews+ but they are still offering their print, web, and eBook editions too. Maybe the solution is having multiple revenue streams.

Can the new Netflix model for magazines work? Would hundreds of magazines sharing a tiny bit from millions of subscribers pay better than thousands of subscribers paying larger chunks of change?

AppleNews+ offers several categories of magazines (Business + Finance, Cars, Entertainment, Food, Health, etc.). Wouldn’t it be interesting if they included a category for Literature? They could offer various genre magazines, literary journals, poetry magazines, and maybe even Writer’s Digest, The Writer, and Poets & Writers. That way all the would-be writers of the world would want to subscribe.

Over the last decade, I’ve tried Zinio, Texture, and other e-magazine services. I subscribed to Texture for a couple of years and then canceled. I went back to paper magazines. I didn’t feel I was using Texture enough. I thought if I had magazines lying around the house again I’d do more reading. But I haven’t. I signed up for AppleNews+ because, at $10 a month, it’s far cheaper, and I won’t have those piles of magazines around the house making me feel guilty. It’s a cheap enough way to have magazines when I do want them.

I’ve come to realize that I have to pay if I want certain things in this world to exist, even if I don’t use them.

I subscribe to four SF magazines that I seldom read. I read when I can, or when I see a story recommended, or when a friend tells me about a story. I subscribe because I want them to exist. I subscribe because I want a place for new SF writers to get published. I subscribe because one day if I can ever get back into writing fiction I’ll have a place to submit my stories.

We have to realize that free content on the internet isn’t free. We’ve got to come up with revenue systems that work. I think the internet needs to remain free, so we can always have instant access to content, but we need to find ways to pay publishers who present free content on the web.

The rising costs of printing and postage are making publishing the old way impractical. I love printed magazines. Last year I subscribed to Asimov’s, Analog and F&SF because I thought I wanted to collect them again. But they all ruined that desire by putting mailing labels on their beautiful covers. If they had shipped their magazines in protective wrappers I would still be subscribing to the print editions. I have a nostalgia for that. But I feel the age of printed magazines is nearly over. It’s actually much easier to read AppleNews+ than the paper magazines. Many of the essays I read from AppleNews+ are free to read on the web or through Flipboard, but AppleNews+ formats the content for eye-friendlier reading. That’s also worth $10 a month.

I’d love if AppleNews+ included fiction magazines. Or if all the fiction magazine publishers allied together and created a monthly subscription service like AppleNews+. I’d be willing to pay another $10 a month for it.

JWH

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