Loading...

Follow Specifier Review on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

UK based manufacturer, Rizistal, is a supplier of industrial and easy-to-use repair and protection products offering a superior Paving Joint Compound for patios. Rizistal PC100 will deliver results for your clients effectively and efficiently the first time to minimise disruption to any premises.

Rizistal PC100 Paving Joint Compound is a ready-to-use jointing material that can be used in both dry and wet conditions, and on all types of paving with a joint width of 6 mm and over. It cures overnight at 20°C allowing the area to be suitable for traffic with minimal downtime.

Coverage is approximately 7 m² over 600 mm x 450 mm paving slabs and the product is available in the popular Natural Stone colour. A stand out benefit of PC100 is its quick application time and longevity once installed due to it being unaffected by wind, rain washout, and mechanical sweeping equipment.

Alex Holdway, Product Manager for Rizistal, has put together an expert guide for installing PC100 Paving Joint Compound:

“PC100 contains a vacuum sealed foil bag to keep the product fresh and to make the application easy.

Before installation you will need to remove loose materials from the surface.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Fire and Acoustic Door Solutions you can rely on.
With a vast experience in the development of technical solutions for the Hotel Sector, among others, Vicaima presents an integrated offer of certified products, including various Fire and Acoustic Door performances for different applications such as:

  • Room entrances
  • Connecting rooms
  • Conference roooms
  • Communal areas
  • Technical shafts

Specifying Vicaima Fire and Acoustic doors solutions, will provide:

  • Tested to BS and EN Standards
  • Certified by accredited laboratories
  • Third party Accreditation under BWF-Certifire and BM Trada Q-Mark schemes
  • CE marked ironmongery
  • Factory approved glazing
  • Wide range of finishes and designs
  • Flexibility on dimensions and product configurations
  • DoorsKits or Sets   

For more information regarding Vicaima Fire and Acoustic Door solutions visit www.vicaima.com

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Leading British ventilation manufacturer Vent-Axia, has welcomed the Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018, which came into force 20th March 2019.

The Act makes it a legal requirement that rental properties, both social housing and private, are fit for human habitation at the beginning and throughout a tenancy, including the need for effective ventilation and freedom from damp. This is good news for tenants who should be able to demand good indoor air quality (IAQ) within their homes, protecting their health from the ill effects of condensation and mould.

An amendment to the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985, the Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act now addresses problems caused by defective design – such as lack of ventilation – rather than just disrepair. The new rules also cover communal areas in shared buildings. If a home does not meet the standard and the property owner does not carry out the necessary repairs or maintenance, tenants will have the right to take them to court where a judge can issue an injunction forcing the work to be carried out.

“We are pleased to see the importance of good ventilation being recognised in this Act.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Specifier Review by Kirsty Hammond - 4d ago

With advances in access control technology, key fobs and readers are replacing traditional locks and keys. PAC GDX area manager, Lloyd Palmer, examines what to consider when specifying access control within social and affordable housing, and the benefits it offers local authorities and residents alike.

Restricting access to who is able allowed? to enter a multi-tenant residential building is perhaps the most obvious way to ensure that the right people can get in, while keeping the wrong people out. The latest access technology utilises key fobs and/or smartcards and for residents, especially the elderly or those with disabilities, these types of devices are far more convenient than having to remember personal identification number (PIN) codes. Just as importantly, building managers can monitor patterns of behaviour to ensure residents are safe, while also combating antisocial activities.

Growing concern

Modern access control technology encompasses everything from locally controlled single door solutions to multi-door internet protocol (IP) enabled systems that can be remotely managed and fully integrated with other building services such as CCTV, fire detection and intruder alarms. In fact, the latest state-of-the-art systems offer an entirely multifaceted access control experience and are easy to configure and operate.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Specifier Review by Kirsty Hammond - 4d ago

Paterson Gordon Architecture were approached by Mr and Mrs Smith of Glasgow to bring their fresh idea to life.

The idea behind the development began when the Smiths were living with cold and damp conditions in their previous conservatory. They wished to create a bright, open space with abundant natural light which would suit the lifestyle of their young family.

The hipped roof of the existing dwelling led to Paterson Gordon Architecture designing the extension with a ‘flat’ three degree roof pitch. The architects refrained from imitating the form and materials of the existing dwelling, instead choosing to use complementary materials which sit comfortably alongside the existing traditional building form.

To compliment the aluminium flashings which provided the roof with a sharp edge, FAKRO DMF and DXF flat roof windows were selected.

The use of these roof windows had been specified in the kitchen area to allow a sufficient level of light into the living space. The remaining parts of the room were finished to a high level with storage units and appliances.

 

 
Using standard windows to bring in natural daylight would have used up valuable storage space in the kitchen so the DMF and DXF flat roof windows allowed the new kitchen to be flooded with natural light, whilst retaining plenty of storage space.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Researchers from Robert Gordon University’s (RGU) Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment are conducting a research project into an innovative housing construction method which could help to bring down the cost for house-buyers.

In collaboration with the Construction Scotland Innovation Centre (CSIC) and timber engineering firm, Glulam Solution, the project will focus on the robotic fabrication of a cross-laminated timber (CLT) joint.

At the moment, most construction takes place as manual assembly onsite, which can lead to delays, inaccuracies, material defects and material waste. Robotic off-site fabrication will bring the benefits of industrialised production systems to construction.

Off-site timber construction has been widely explored in other countries, such as Japan, however, Scotland has not risen to the challenge of off-site timber construction despite having significant expertise in the area.

Theo Dounas, learning excellence leader at RGU, believes the research project has the potential to significantly improve construction methods, helping to increase the quality and output while reducing costs and time.

“This proof-of-concept research project will look at process of designing a simple timber prototype house to address pressing market needs within Scotland and the UK,” he said.

“The innovation lies with the integration of a house design prototype and its robotic fabrication out of complex CLT panels manufactured off-site.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Last month, we wrote about an issue many people tend to neglect: the inspection and recertification of fixed ladders.

It is a common misconception that fixed ladders do not need to be inspected, and this can lead to serious injury or worse if a ladder falls into disrepair and someone tries to use it. Ladders contribute to a large number of work at height injury and fatality statistics each year.

However, this highlights another common issue: no matter how often you check your ladder for failures, there’s a chance it was never even safe to begin with.

Beyond the standard inspection criteria for use, there are a set of criteria that must be met for the ladder to be deemed compliant to start with. If your ladder does not meet these criteria, it could be a glaring danger to everyone on your site, as well as visitors.

According to the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations, ACOP and BS4211, these criteria are:

  • Fixed ladders should not be used where it would be practical to install a conventional staircase
  • The ladder should be of sound construction, properly maintained and securely fixed
  • Assembly should be sufficiently rigid and stable to ensure safety of the user under normal conditions
  • Handrails should extend at least 1100mm above landing
  • Stiles should extend to the height of guarding
  • The ladder should not exceed 6m without an intermediate landing
  • Hoops should be fixed if the ladder exceeds 2.5m
  • Fall protection, preferably passive such as cages, should be provided if there is a risk of falling more than 2m
  • Hoops should be a maximum of 900mm apart
  • Hoops should not exceed 1500mm apart with uprights not more than 300mm apart
  • The width between the strings should be between 300mm (400mm preferred) and 600mm
  • Handrails should open out to between 600mm and 700mm above the landing
  • Rungs must withstand 1.5kN and have a diameter of 20-35mm
  • The top rung should be level with the platform
  • Rise between rungs should be 225mm to 300mm
  • A minimum of 200mm clear space should be behind each rung
  • Clear space on the user side should be 600mm

What’s the big deal?

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

According to research carried out by Fields in Trust, parks and green spaces across the UK provide people with over £34 billion of health and wellbeing benefits. The Government, Local Councils, Charities and businesses across many sectors are increasingly investing into park areas and public green spaces.

Popular investments include a wide range of events, including park runs and other sporting meet-ups, local fairs, agricultural shows, festivals and cultural occasions and music concerts.

Powering such events can sometimes be problematic with traditional power sources, for example stand-alone petrol generators. These devices pose various hazards to nearby pedestrians in the form of electrocution and tripping potential (with trailing wires).

Pop Up Power Supplies® manufacture and supply a range of pop up electric sockets which are ideal for powering kiosks and stalls in parks and green spaces. Our Pop Up Power Units and In Ground Power Units provide a sensitive source of electricity for outdoor events, have minimal impact on the nearby surrounds and importantly are incredibly safe for nearby pedestrians.

The main benefit of our Retractable Telescopic Feeder Pillars is their discreet nature. The Pop Up Power Units can be easily raised and lowered by event organisers to provide electrical outlets.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

VitrA, one of the UK’s fastest growing bathroom brands, has launched a striking, intuitive, and multi-functional website designed for all.

The newly launched interactive website from VitrA makes it easy for all customers, from homeowners to architects and retailers, to choose a perfect bathroom. The new website offers intuitive navigation, beautiful imagery and enhanced product browsing through a seamless user experience. Many new features help visitors throughout their bathroom planning journey.

With VitrA Pro, users can create a personal profile and store favourite products in one place. There is also the ability to create projects to group and explore products together and the option to download all the product information in one go or save for a later date.

For the undecided or those at the beginning of their journey who need a little more inspiration, the inspirational ideas section has lots of trend ideas and style solutions, such as how to style a small bathroom, or how to incorporate smart technology.  There is also an exciting blog filled with recent news, designer interviews, latest trends and case studies.

“We have put an enormous amount of effort and resource into this new VitrA site,” says Margaret Talbot, marketing manager for VitrA in the UK, “We are delighted with the result.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Manchester Airport has celebrated the completion of the first major phase of its £1bn transformation programme.

Passengers flying out of the UK’s third largest airport were welcomed onto a new pier, which connects to Terminal 2, for the first time last week.

Construction of the 216m long structure commenced on site in July 2017 with the build completed in late January 2019. The facility was then trialled before transitioning into operation on 1 April.

The Pier which provides 11 jetty served “contact” stands has more than 1400 seats in a fully glazed upper departures level offering panoramic views of the airfield. A separate, segregated arrivals level provides passengers with a travellator-assisted walking route to the main terminal arrivals facilities.

It will be used by all airlines currently operating out of T2 and was constructed from 14,000 steel pieces, 47,184 bolts and painted with 2,600 litres of paint.

In preparation for the pier, the apron was extended by 49,000sqm to accommodate new aircraft parking stands, along with the construction of a new taxiway and associated infrastructure and services.

The opening marks the next phase of the airport’s multi-phased transformation programme that will see Terminal 2 become the focal point of its operations.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview