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Seth's Blog by Seth Godin - 16h ago

A Toyota Prius passed me at 100 miles an hour. I didn’t know a Prius could even go that fast. The driver was passing on the right, using the breakdown lane, zigging and zagging across traffic. If a car could careen, he was.

The problem with this sort of fast passage is that there’s no room for error. One mistake, one failure, and you’re out.

The other sort of rambunctious, risky forward motion is very different.

This is the work we do when we’re out on a limb with a new idea. When we’re sharing ideas that feel personal or important. This is the work of practical empathy, and most of all, of acting ‘as if’ before we’re sure.

The thing is–even though this might feel as risky as driving down the Saw Mill River Parkway at 100 miles an hour, it’s actually the safest work you can do. If you fail while trying to help, you’ll get another chance. And then another.

Unlimited chances.

       
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Thanks to everyone who already made it a bestseller. So many people went to the site Tuesday, we broke Amazon’s checkout algorithm for several hours–I’m apologizing on their behalf if it’s been a hassle. I appreciate your persistence.

You can find all the ways to buy it here. (Along with a free excerpt and some reviews).

This is Marketing is about modern marketing, the post-advertising, post-spam sort of marketing that we can be proud of.

The book’s ideas are relevant to organizations big and small, non-profits, politicians, and freelancers too.

Here are some of the ideas in the book:

  • People like us do things like this
  • Work that matters for people who care
  • Make things better, make better things
  • Serve the smallest viable audience
  • Who eats lunch first?
  • This might not work
  • When in doubt, look for the fear
  • Positioning is done as a service for our customers
  • Marketers create change. No change, no marketing.
  • If you’re going to do all this work, might as well do something you’re proud of
  • Some people measure affiliation, others seek to engage with the story of dominance
  • How leaky is your funnel?
  • Why will someone enroll to go on this journey?
  • Anticipated, personal and relevant messages always do better than the other kind
  • The network effect is the ratchet that builds projects that grow
  • It’s not your tribe, but you can lead them for a while
  • Are you a direct marketer? What do you measure?
  • What’s it for? Who’s it for?
  • Create and relieve tension
  • Everything we do is a flag, and every flag tells a story
  • Will they miss you when you’re gone?

We’re doing a Facebook Live today from 11:45 to 12:15 Eastern time. I’ll be answering your questions about the ideas in the book.

I’ve also done a ton of podcasts in preparation for the launch. You can find the complete list here.

Here are some of the most recent: Tim FerrissRyan Hawk, Behind the BrandKirby HassemanMarketing Today, In the Arena, Marketing Week, Marketing Speak, The Marketing Book Podcast,Marketing Over Coffee, Larry Weeks, David Meerman Scott, User Defenders, Eat Sleep WorkAdrian SwinscoeBoston ContentBill Carmody, The Copywriter ClubEscape the Rat Race1% Better, MarieTV , Chase Jarvis (both below), Duct Tape Marketing,  The Remarkable Leadership PodcastThe Future of Work. (more to come, updated here).

Struggling to Find Marketing Strategies That Work? Seth Godin and Marie Forleo Can Help - YouTube

Seth Godin: How to Do Work That Matters for People Who Care - YouTube

PS if you get a copy in the next week or so, you can join our digital launch party, with videos, Q&As, and best of all, peer to peer interaction. The code to join in is on page 260 (or at the end of the Kindle ebook). If you have the audiobook, look for a special link on the sign up page. Sign up here.

And last, here’s a link to my latest episode of Akimbo, which has a cogent summary of what this is all about.

       
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Those emergencies from a year ago (and a month ago), they’re gone.

Either they were solved, or they became things to live with. But emergencies don’t last. They fade.

Knowing that, knowing that you will outlast them, every single one of them, does it make it easier to see the problem, not the panic?

       
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Seth's Blog by Seth Godin - 4d ago

Today is launch day for my new book. Thanks to fast-clicking readers and alumni, it’s already a bestseller. You can check out some of the advance reviews. And the Financial Times picked it one of November’s books of the month. And 800CEOREAD just long listed it as one of the best marketing books of the year…

Lots of cool surprises in this post, just for you and my other favorite blog readers…

For the first time, we’re hosting an online launch party. If you grab a copy in the next two weeks, we’d love to have you join us.

The launch party will feature exclusive videos from me expanding on ideas in the book, an ongoing Q&A session and most of all, a chance to connect with thousands of other alumni of our online seminar and the purchasers of the book as well. You’ll find a cohort of fascinating and generous people there, and my hope is that if you’re an eager contributor to the party, you’ll find that it’s even worth more than the cost of the book itself.

If you’re an early adopter, the kind of person who goes first, you’re our kind of person. Join the launch party to meet more people like us. If you get a copy in the next week or so, you can join in. Sign up here.

The launch party is free to join for readers. Once you buy a copy of the book, you’ll find a code on the bottom of page 260 (or in the Kindle edition, at the end of the acknowledgments) that will get you into the Party. If you’re listening on audio, use the link at the bottom of the page.

One more thing…

Along the way, we’ve created:

An action figure, a milk carton, a cereal box, not one but two books that each weighed 17 pounds, a wooden boxed set, a letterpress poster and many more–and each sold out. All created at breakeven, all for fun, all for the true fans. Your chance to have something that almost no one else does.

And the new one is fun indeed:

Find out more about the collectible here.

There are only 2,000 of them in the warehouse, and we’re not going to make any more. I hope you’ll check it out before they’re all gone. There are 19 different covers packed in four different sets of 8… see if you can collect them all.

And what will you do with those 7 extra books, the ones that come with a limited-edition custom cover?

I’m hoping you’ll share them.

You might share them with co-workers because you know that if you can all get on the same page, your marketing will work better and you’ll be more likely to be able to do work you’re proud of.

You could share them with non-profit leaders or political leaders, because you want their work to spread.

And perhaps you’ll share them with your students, your friends or those you admire, because now’s the best time to make a ruckus.

Person to person, horizontally.

Making the covers and the custom box and the rest of it was thrilling, and I can’t thank you enough for letting us do this work. Highlights from the book in tomorrow’s post…

       
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If you share a pizza with a large crowd, no one will be very satisfied.

But if you share an idea with a group, it creates cultural impact and becomes more valuable as it spreads, not less.

Most of the time, we adopt the scarcity model of pizza. “I don’t have that much, and if I share it with you, I won’t have any left…”

But in fact, the useful parts of our life are better characterized as, “If I share it with you, we’ll both have it.”

An idea shared is more powerful than one that’s hidden. A technology standard outperforms a proprietary one. A community is stronger than divided individuals ever could be.

When you give away your work by building the network, you’re not giving it away at all.

You’re building trust, authority and a positive cycle of better.

       
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Seth's Blog by Seth Godin - 6d ago

Not groggy, not zoned out, not hyper, merely awake.

Aware of what’s around us. Present. Seeing things clearly, hearing them as if for the first time.

How often are we lucky enough to be awake?

Mass media, social networks, marketers—they rarely help us become awake. They seek clicking, buying, fearful zombies instead.

The people we seek to serve, those that we’re trying to reach–in the rare moments when they’re awake, are we wasting that tiny slice of magic? Do we create fear or boredom or ennui in the short run merely because it’s easier for us?

Seeking a state of awake seems like a worthy quest. And when we find it, it’s worth cherishing.

       
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Seth's Blog by Seth Godin - 1w ago

The unanticipated but important memo has a difficult road. It will likely be ignored.

The difficult parts:

a. no one is waiting to hear from you

b. you need to have the clarity to know who it’s for, what’s it for and precisely what you want them to do

c. you have to have the guts to leave out everything that isn’t part of (b)

Consider a memo that was left outside my door at a hotel recently. The management distributed 1000 of them and perhaps ten people read it and took action.

Here’s what to keep in mind:

  1. Pattern interrupt. When was the last time you listened to the seat belt announcement on an airplane? We ignore it because we’ve been trained to ignore it. When you show up in a place, at a time, with a format that we’ve been trained to ignore, we’ll ignore you.
  2. Write a story. You seek engagement. Talk about me. About you, about yesterday, today and tomorrow. If you earn the first sentence, you’ll need to sell me on reading the second sentence.
  3. Frame the story. Help me compare it to something. Create urgency. Make it about me, my status, my needs.
  4. Chunk the message. How many things are you trying to say? (Hint: two might be too many). Let me scan instead of study.
  5. Include a call to action. Right here, right now.

Here’s a before and after of what inspired me.

       
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Seth's Blog by Seth Godin - 1w ago

Filling up a bucket might not be fast or easy, but you can easily measure your progress. Patience isn’t difficult, because you can see it getting filled.

Most of what’s important to us, though, doesn’t show itself this way.

Drip by drip is how we build things, but we can’t see it. One more “no,” one more failure, one more lesson learned.

It’s not a bucket, but it is a journey.

       
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Perhaps it’s time to do something else.

Not a new job, or a new city, but perhaps a different story.

A story about possibility and sufficiency. A story about connection and trust. A story about for and with, instead of at or to.

Bootstrapping your way to a new story about the world around you is one of the most difficult things you’ll ever do. Our current story was built piecemeal, over time, the result of vivid interactions and hard-fought lessons.

But if that story isn’t getting you where you need to go, then what’s it for?

It’s entirely possible that the story we tell ourselves all day every day is true and accurate and useful, the very best representation of the world as it actually is.

It’s possible, but vanishingly unlikely.

What if we search for a useful story instead? A story that helps us cause the change we seek to make in the world, and to feel good doing it.

If you can’t solo bootstrap it, get some help to install a new story. It’s worth it.

       
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