The Nuances of Understanding a Fraction as a Number
Math Minds
by mathmindsblog
2y ago
Student work is just the best. It is the one thing that will always motivate me to write! So, let’s kick this post off with a great work example from 3rd grade. In this task, students are asked to locate 1 on a number line labeled with 0 and 1/3. When I look at student work, I typically think about 3 things:  I look for evidence of what the student understands. In this case, it also involves making some assumptions because we can only know so much based on written work. I think about question(s) I would want to ask the student. Again, because we can only know so much from written work ..read more
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Thinking Through Asynchronous Assessments
Math Minds
by mathmindsblog
2y ago
Over the past months, like many people, I have been thinking a lot about what it looks like to reimagine a curriculum that was intended for use in an in-person setting for digital implementation. Alongside an amazing working group of teachers and coaches, we have gone piece by piece through the IM K-5 curriculum components and discussed the purposes, opportunities, and challenges of each when transitioning to a digital setting, whether it be synchronous or asynchronous. Discussions around the student experience and student engagement were challenging, but really pushed us to think deeply about ..read more
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Coherent Learning Experiences K-12
Math Minds
by mathmindsblog
3y ago
(Originally written for IM: https://illustrativemathematics.blog/2019/05/07/designing-coherent-learning-experiences-k-12/) One challenge in curriculum design is considering all we know and believe to be true about math teaching and learning and translating that into realistic and actionable pieces for teachers and students. Our recent post about the K–5 curriculum focused around our belief that each and every student should be seen as a unique person with unique knowledge and needs. And while that post centered on elementary materials, to truly design around this belief we must look past K–5 t ..read more
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