Meet Mr Benn
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
2w ago
This panel came from a section of a door at Bennfield House.  The house was built in North Street, Rugby in 1669 and was the home of the Benn Family.  The Benns were a wealthy local family. Thomas and Maria Benn were married in 1813 and had five sons. The sons gave a lot to local concerns, funding building work on St Andrews Church, local schools and the building of the clocktower. Because the brothers never married, whatever fortunes they had passed down the line to the youngest, George, being the last to die in 1895. In his will were many bequests to local charities and orga ..read more
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1944 Rugby Targetted!
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
1M ago
To mark the 80th anniversary of the D-Day landings this month we’ve chosen a Second World War map of Rugby for the object of the month.   This map was found in an aerodrome by the donor’s husband who was air force ground staff following the D-Day landings.   The D-day operation took place on 6th June 1944 and saw over 150,000 Western Allies invading by sea and air on the Normandy coast of France with the aim to liberate Europe from Nazi Germany’s control. It was a key turning point in the war and gave the Allies a foothold in France. This crumpled map entitled 'Special Edition' (So ..read more
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A good match?
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
2M ago
  This month’s object of the month is featured in our current local history display Picturing Rugby. Matchbox covers appeared in the early 19th century as way of protecting cardboard or wooden matchboxes. As a frequently used item, boxes were easily damaged to the point where they couldn’t be used for striking matches.  More ornate covers, owned by the wealthy, were made of silver, enamelled, or engraved. Cheaper metals, wood or papier mâché were used for mass produced covers, although they still carried decorations, such as this one. They were also used as souvenirs and advertising ..read more
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Jet ready, jet set, GO!
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
3M ago
This plaque commemorates the first test run of the jet-propelled engine at British Thomson Houston in Rugby in April 1937.  It was unveiled in 1987 by the inventor, Sir Frank Whittle (1907-1996), to mark the 50th anniversary of the test.  It was originally on the wall of Building 86/86a at the site. As a young man he joined the RAF and was recommended for officer training in 1926. During his training he wrote a thesis on the future development of aircraft engine design. In this he first mentioned the potential for forms of propulsion such as turbine engines. He patented the ideas in ..read more
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Lennon Bros on the road
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
4M ago
March's object of the month is this black and white photograph of a van owned by Lennon Bros Ltd., who were a local firm of tobacconists. The Lennon family moved to Rugby in 1904. In 1911, the family lived at “The Globe Hotel” on Railway Terrace. One of the partners of Lennon Bros. Ltd., Ernest Patrick Lennon (1889-1965), was also a member of the Borough Council between 1938-1961. Lennon Close in Hillmorton was named after him and was built in the late 20th Century. His brother, Lionel Lennon (1894-1916), was also a partner. Lionel joined the Honourable Artillery Company in 1916. He was kille ..read more
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An 'unabated' interest in Rugby
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
5M ago
This blue plaque is from Richard Henry Wood’s former residence on Little Church Street in Rugby where he lived from 1874 to 1894.  Wood was an important local figure in the town and a generous benefactor, most noted for his large contribution to the Hospital of St Cross. He also founded the town’s first public library.  Born in Manchester in February 1820, he became a stockbroker and a business partner to an iron merchant, from which he amassed considerable wealth. He moved to Rugby in 1874 where he held positions of the Deputy Lieutenant and Justice of the Peace for Warwickshire.&nb ..read more
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Ice Station Rugby
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
6M ago
2000.353.18 For January’s object of the month we look back at some wintery weather with a photograph of the Oxford Canal near Hillmorton Locks taken 42 years ago in January 1982. It shows large chunks of broken ice on the canal’s surface. Many boats had been left ice-bound by the cold weather. The photograph was taken by Joseph Hogg who worked on the canals for many years.  In early December 1981 the severe cold snap began and continued through to mid-January. It was one of the coldest winters in living memory as people endured blizzard conditions and the lowest ever recorded temperature ..read more
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The key to the road!
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
8M ago
Hiltons Garage was on North Street in Rugby from 1903 to the 1960s.  Originally started by George Hilton as a cycle repair shop, it expanded as the motoring public needed vehicle servicing along with petrol pumps by the roadside. This leather keyring was given to customers with the keys to their new car. The large site, which included lock ups, service areas and a sales floor, was bought in the 1970s to make way for the new shopping centre complex.  The keyring is currently on display in the Local History Gallery as part of the Redding Around Rugby exhibition with photographs of th ..read more
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Rugby's Warship
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
9M ago
This shield was presented to the Borough of Rugby by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to commemorate the adoption of the HMS Keppel by the Borough during Warship Week.  During the Second World War, cities, towns and villages organised Warship Weeks to raise money to meet the cost of providing a particular naval ship. The scheme was introduced by the National War Savings Committee.  Once enough money had been raised for the ship, the local community would adopt the ship. HMS Keppel was an active destroyer. Its role was sinking German submarines and picking up survivors of vess ..read more
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And the walls came tumblin' down
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum Blog
by Tammany Heap
10M ago
We are very lucky to have a dynamic and flexible space which is mainly due to our panelock wall system. The system works with the walls hanging from a metal track, allowing them to move across the whole gallery space and locking in all different ways to enable us to adapt and change the look and feel of the exhibitions. For some shows like the Rugby Open we need maximum wall space. The Gallery officer will try to accommodate as many walls as possible and make the gallery exciting space for work to hide behind other walls so your journey is always a surprise around the gallery. Other exhib ..read more
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