Review: The Earl’s Iron Warrant by Kate Archer (2021)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
3w ago
A terrific end to an excellent series. Yes, there was a certain sameiness to the plots but there was so much originality to the side issues, and it was so damned funny, I can forgive everything. Here’s the premise: of the six dukes who set up the original pact (the premise of the series) for their sons to be forced to marry and produce heirs, five have complied. Only Lord Dalton still defies his father, swearing he will never marry, no matter what. Miss Daisy Danworth, daughter of the positively horrid Lord Childress, has also sworn never to marry, and the death of her not at all lamented pare ..read more
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Review: The Peer’s Roguish Word by Kate Archer (2021)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
3w ago
Hugely enjoyable, and a great contrast with the previous book, where the two principals were obviously well suited by their common love of horses. Here, they couldn’t be more different, but the author makes it work beautifully. Here’s the premise: Miss Kitty Dell is an intellectual, more interested in science and her books than dancing. Still, it’s time to put aside her books and enjoy her first season in town, and perhaps she’ll meet a like-minded gentleman amongst the members of the Royal Society? Certainly she’ll never marry anyone like Giles, Marquess of Grayson, who is a frivolous dandy ..read more
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Review: The Baron’s Dangerous Contract by Kate Archer (2021)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
3w ago
Book 4 of the series, and I confess they are a bit samey, but still hugely entertaining. This is the horse-mad couple, so anyone not interested in vast amounts of equine discussion should steer clear. Here’s the premise: Penny Darlington and Henry, Viscount Cabot have been good friends for two years now. They meet frequently, and at balls he generally takes the supper dance so they can talk more – about their mutual love of horses. They get on like a house on fire, and she’s even begun to think there may be something in it. But then, in one night, it’s all ruined. He tells her curtly that she ..read more
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Review: The Lord’s Desperate Pledge by Kate Archer (2020)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
3w ago
Another five star read, although it was a close run thing. The first few chapters were, frankly, a bit dull (the season again? Really?), but once the hero showed up to play piquet everything livened up nicely. Here’s the premise: Hayes, Viscount Ashworth, is the heir to a dukedom, but it’s not a dukedom in very good heart. He’s managed to turn things around by his skill at cards, and he’s not about to be distracted from his purpose by anyone, least of all a bucolic chit like Lily Farnsworth. But when she tells him that she can beat him at piquet – his own speciality! – he sets out to take her ..read more
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Review: The Marquess’ Daring Wager by Kate Archer (2020)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
1M ago
Oh, this was so much fun! I enjoyed the first book in the series, but this was actually a lot better, funnier on several levels, with some gloriously eccentric characters and a very determined and not at all risk averse hero. Here’s the premise: following the pact made by six dukes to force their heirs to marry, and the determination of said heirs to avoid matrimony at all costs, one of their number has already fallen into parson’s mousetrap. Now Richard, the Marquess of Lockwood, is veering dangerously close to falling for Lady Sybil Hayworth. He’s been paying her pointed attention during the ..read more
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Review: The Viscount’s Sinful Bargain by Kate Archer (2020)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
1M ago
This shouldn’t have been my cup of tea at all. It’s awash with dukes, it’s all about the season (yawn) and it features a feisty heroine and an arrogant hero. And yet, somehow, it worked, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Who’d a thunk it? Here’s the premise: six dukes are thoroughly fed up with their heirs refusing to marry and provide them with the vital grandsons they need to continue the line. They form a pact to knock their respective sons into shape, which involves losing their allowances and having to live in penury. The said heirs are outraged by this potential curtailment to their enjoyably ..read more
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Review: The Lord And The Lady Astronomer by Alissa Baxter (2013)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
1M ago
I enjoyed this, as always with this author, but these books do become a little samey after a while. The heroine engrossed in her scientific endeavours, the hero enamoured right from the start but with misunderstandings… this was a sweet romance, but not particularly dramatic. Here’s the premise: Abigail, the youngest of the sisters featured in this series, is interested in astronomy, so it’s a real thrill when her uncle, Lord Longmore, invites her to assist with a star chart he’s compiling. The other person assisting him is William, Viscount Rochvale, the heir to an earldom, who takes a shine ..read more
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Review: The Baron And The Lady Chemist by Alissa Baxter (2023)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
1M ago
I’m a big fan of the author, and I like that she gives her heroines unusual interests for a Regency lady, but it does tend to throw the plot onto a predictable path. Still a good read, but I’d have liked to be surprised now and then. Here’s the premise: Dorothea (or Thea) Grantham is fascinated by chemistry, and has learnt to apply its principles to adding unusual colours to silk. Her shawls and scarves are therefore highly unusual, and much admired, but ladies aren’t supposed to get involved in serious science projects, so when it comes time to make her debut in society, she’d better keep qui ..read more
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Review: Jennie Kissed Me by Joan Smith (1991)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
1M ago
Another oddity. I’m on something of a binge of Joan Smith books just now, and almost every one has a review that says: not her best work. I’d love to know what her best work is, actually, but that aside, here’s one where I can also say: not her best work. Here’s the premise: Jennie Robsjohn (such an odd name!) was a teacher at a seminary in Bath until she inherited a small fortune – ten thousand pounds. Enough for her to give up her job and live like a gentlewoman, and if she goes to London, perhaps she’ll meet a nice man and marry. A baronet, perhaps. But at an inn along the Bath to London ro ..read more
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Review: Highcliffe House by Megan Walker (2024)
Mary Kingswood Blog
by Mary Kingswood
1M ago
I’m not at all sure what to make of this one. It’s well written, although I strongly dislike the dual first person perspectives, but none of it really convinces me and it doesn’t quite feel Regency to me, although I can’t quite say why. Just something out of kilter. Here’s the premise: Anna Lane detests her wealthy father’s business partner, Graham Everett. He’s always taking her father away from her, sometimes just by distracting him with business affairs and sometimes physically, leaving her alone, since her mother is dead. After she mistakenly entangles herself with the wrong man, all she w ..read more
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