Garlic Scapes: A Delicious Garden Task
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
3w ago
The garlic plants are sending out scapes. Our job is to harvest and eat them! If we left the scapes on the garlic plants, they’d grow into beautiful flowers, using up energy. Instead, gardeners snap or snip the entire scape from every plant, freeing up those resources to help grow our target crop: heads of garlic. Here are the wrong and right way to harvest scapes. The gardener on the left hasn’t snapped off enough of the scape. See the stalk remaining on the plant? The gardener on the right snapped off the entire scape, all the way down to the leaves. That’s how it’s done. There’s another ..read more
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Memorial Day Weekend Garden Scramble
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
1M ago
Memorial Day weekend is a huge gardening time for Vermonters. We’re no exception. The weekend began on Friday at Cate Farm, where these great folks grew the garden’s seedlings for basil (Italian, cinnamon, lemon, and Thai), Sungold cherry tomatoes, chili peppers (poblanos and shishitos), cucumbers (Marketmore and lemon), dill, eggplants, and Italian parsley. We even met two prospective new gardeners who stopped by. With nighttime temperatures dipping into the forties and a cool, wet week in the forecast, it’s too early to plant these babies. Instead, we’re gradually hardening them off, leavin ..read more
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Planting Potatoes in Trenches and Elsewhere
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
2M ago
The timing was perfect. The night before potato planting, a gardener found the last of 2023’s blanched-and-frozen potatoes at the bottom of the chest freezer and made a delicious treat: Slice the potatoes thinly, brush with avocado oil, sprinkle with seasonings—in this case, salt, smoked paprika, thyme, and sumac powder—and roast on a pan at 400° for 30 minutes or until perfect. First, we bought potato seed—or is it seed potato?—from Guy’s Farm and Yard in Montpelier. With the help of Chester the shop kitty, we selected 15# of white Kennebec, 10# of red Norland, and 5# of purple Viking potat ..read more
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First Garden Food of the Season
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
2M ago
French sorrel is among the first garden crops to appear and the last being harvested before the garden goes to sleep for the winter. This perennial herb has a lemony tang to brighten up any salad or sandwich. It is a cooking herb, and gardeners share French sorrel soup recipes every season (here’s one). Just pinch or snip off leaves near the ground. French sorrel grows abundantly for harvesting all season long and even needs to be cut back a couple of times. The chives on the left and garlic chives on the right are tender and delicious, and mild tasting this time of year for using raw or coo ..read more
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What’s new in the garden includes history
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
2M ago
Gardeners have been busy planting early crops. Seeds now growing include arugula, chard, kale, pac choi, snow & snap peas, mustard greens, and spinach. Garlic planted in November 2023 emerges this spring. Crops planted in previous seasons are coming up too. Several rows of garlic planted in November 2023 are visible, as are the leaves of volunteer elephant garlic that’s even older. Perennials and self-seeders are returning: French sorrel, oregano, sage, thyme, and tomatillos. Two boxes of asparagus are just getting started and don’t produce much, but we can each have a taste when the time ..read more
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A Flurry of Spring Planting
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
2M ago
Gardeners planted arugula, carrots, chard, kale, mustard greens, pac choi, snap and snow peas, and spinach in beds that had been covered in leaf mulch for the winter. They created narrow furrows, they mixed in compost, and dropped in the seeds. Finally, they watered in the seeds, which need a drink every day. Flower Power Team unearthed the weedy flower rows for later planting of seedlings that were started indoors. Out in the rows, they preserved perennials that will come into bloom later on. Behold, before and after weeding! Berryville is the garden’s newest project. Here, gardeners prepar ..read more
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Goodnight, Sweet Garden
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
7M ago
Sleep well. We look forward to seeing you in the spring. The post Goodnight, Sweet Garden first appeared on The Garden at 485 Elm ..read more
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The Winter Squash Bed Becomes the Garlic Bed
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
9M ago
Winter squash harvest day comes before the first frost or after the squash have stopped maturing in each day’s reduced sunlight and warmth. Gardeners harvested the squashes for sorting and distribution then pulled up the vines, which went onto the garden waste windrow. We grow three or four squash varieties each year. Delicious, versatile delicata is a favorite. Gardeners arranged the squash by variety. From left to right, butternut, delicata, buttercup, and a grab bag of smalls. In the background to the left, a gardener dumps a load of squash vines onto the garden waste windrow. The windro ..read more
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Harvesting, Processing, Cooking, and Eating Edamame
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
10M ago
Most of the garden’s edamame was ready to harvest. These green plants in the foreground will grow a while longer, but the yellow plants you see the gardeners working on, and the ones way in the background between them, were ripe and ready. Instead of pulling out whole plants, gardeners snipped them off just above the ground to leave the healthy legume roots to imbue the soil with nutrients. Each row still contains five plants, which will be left there for the pods to dry out and supply our edamame seed for 2024. The next task was removing edamame pods from each plant. The pods were divided ..read more
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Potato Harvest Day
The Garden at 485 Elm
by thegardenat485elm
11M ago
Potatoes are one of the crops we harvest all at once and divide among gardeners. The others are edamame, garlic, onions, and winter squash. Other share-divided crops, when we grow them, include Brussels sprouts, seed pumpkins, and peanuts. Potatoes took up four short rows and one long row in this season’s garden. They grow underground and use the space efficiently, so harvesting this small area yields generous shares. Gardeners dig in carefully several inches from the plant. It’s impossible to tell from the surface exactly where the potatoes ended up growing, and shovel-chopped potatoes spoi ..read more
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