Oxford’s History of Dinosaur Discoveries
Museum of Oxford Blog
by Lisa Stevens
3d ago
10 min read This blog post was written and researched by MOX volunteer Iulia Costache. Iulia Costache is a Cowley Road resident keen on social research, community and writing. She is a Monitoring and Evaluation consultant with a background in Psychology and Anthropology. An aspiring poet, she often frequents Oxford Poetry Library’s workshops and events. She writes historical blogs around a myriad of topics, but she is particularly interested in diversity, identities and Oxford’s world-leading innovations, contributions and discoveries.  Want to write your own Oxford-inspired post? Sign u ..read more
Visit website
Twin Cities: Oxford and Beyond
Museum of Oxford Blog
by Lisa Stevens
3w ago
9 min read This blog post was written and researched by Thomas Sturgess As an undergraduate history student at Oxford Brookes University, I get to explore a wide range of historical topics. My personal interests in political and cultural history were complemented by my placement at MOX as I could explore a unique part of Oxford’s history and further my research skills. Want to write your own Oxford-inspired post? Sign up as a volunteer blogger. History The system of twinned towns in the UK is not one commonly known to the public, despite its long history dating back to the end of World War ..read more
Visit website
The 1605 Oxford City Charter
Museum of Oxford Blog
by James Schultz
2M ago
5 min read This photo depicts the 1605 Oxford city charter in which ‘for the first time the constituents and powers of the council were defined, and its election procedures described’.[1] As a result of this charter, Oxford became a corporate, free city, and as such, Oxford city  corporation had the power to make by-laws, punish breaches by fine or imprisonment, sue and be sued in the corporate title, and be able to hold or dispose of property under a common seal.[2] This charter served as the foundation of civic governance in Oxford until 1835. Oxford City Charter granted by James I, 1 ..read more
Visit website
The Taken Road Which Made All the Difference: Honouring the Legacy of Oxford’s Prominent Women
Museum of Oxford Blog
by James Schultz
2M ago
13 min read History is much closer than we think, especially in a city like Oxford. The people of Oxford walk through history with each step they take on the cobblestone streets and with each student that goes to one of the many halls for their classes. However, history is not only architecture, but also those who made it happen. As such, it is important to bring to light and honour to those who are oftentimes known, but not acknowledged. March is International Women’s History Month, and Oxford has seen its fair share of women who have fought to be more than simply footnotes in history. Throu ..read more
Visit website
Pink Times – A response to Section 28
Museum of Oxford Blog
by Lisa Stevens
3M ago
11 min readIntroduction November 2023 marked twenty years since the repeal of Section 28. Introduced in 1988, Section 28 was a piece of legislation prohibiting the discussion of homosexuality within schools. Specifically, it forbade the ‘promotion’ of homosexuality, emphasising that no school maintained by the Local Authority could ‘teach the acceptability of homosexuality as a pretended family relationships’ . The legislation was wildly controversial, particularly due to the ongoing AIDS epidemic; whilst the legislation did not forbid sexual health education, many foresaw that the hosti ..read more
Visit website
Mary Sophia Merivale: Oxford’s First Female Councillor
Museum of Oxford Blog
by James Schultz
4M ago
7 min readWho was the First Female Councillor in Oxford? International Women’s Day (8 March) is a time to reflect on and promote women’s political participation. In Oxford, the City Council bucks the national trend with equal numbers of female and male councillors, in a wider context in England where only 36% of local councillors are female compared to 64% male.[1] But we know that has not always been the case, and there was a time when there were not only structural and social barriers but legal barriers preventing women’s democratic participation in local government. So who was the first fe ..read more
Visit website
Dig In! Oxford Food Stories – Oxford Sauce
Museum of Oxford Blog
by Lisa Stevens
5M ago
6 min readThe first mention of an ‘Oxford Sauce’ When it comes to describing what ‘Oxford Sauce’ is, many would likely differ in their answers, if they were aware of its existence at all. Some seasoned foodies might point to Georges Auguste Escoffier’s Oxford Sauce, mentioned in the last book he ever wrote himself, titled Ma Cuisine (1934). Escoffier is widely celebrated for his contributions as a chef, known amongst French media as the ’king of chefs and chef of kings’. He popularised and modernised the French haute cuisine style of cooking and brought it with him to London, where he lived f ..read more
Visit website
Museum of Oxford funds upcoming biography for local Black-British hero Charlie Hutchison (1918-1993)
Museum of Oxford Blog
by Lisa Stevens
6M ago
8 min read Charlie Hutchison’s son John and granddaughter Michelle, at an event hosted by the Museum of Oxford celebrating Charlie Hutchison’s life, 28 October 2022. The Peter McQuitty Bursary, a research bursary awarded by the Museum of Oxford to fund local heritage projects led by young people in Oxford, has chosen to award local historian Dan Poole with funding for the research and creation of a biography of Charlie Hutchison. Due for completion in early 2024, this biography will contain original research based on newly recorded oral interviews with Charlie’s surviving family, alongside ..read more
Visit website
How Oxford became the home of the oldest surviving English newspaper
Museum of Oxford Blog
by Lisa Stevens
8M ago
7 min readPre-newspaper times Even though the printing press was introduced to England in 1476, it was only in the 16th century that printed news took off, and even then, at a very slow pace, due to the necessity of town criers to provide them, stemming from the illiteracy of the general population. Early forms of printed news varied from printed news books to news pamphlets and usually related information pertaining to a singular event (e.g., battles, disasters or public celebrations). The earliest record of such a pamphlet details an eyewitness account of the Battle of Flodden (1513) betwee ..read more
Visit website
How the Jewish community of Oxford brought coffee to England
Museum of Oxford Blog
by Lisa Stevens
10M ago
12 min readThe first Jewish settlements in the United Kingdom Before the Norman Conquest of 1066, Jewish people lived in England, but not as part of organised communities. The first Jewish settlement of 1070 was comprised of Jewish financiers from Rouen, in the northern region of France, who were invited in by William the Conqueror (William I) to establish themselves in England and Wales in the hopes that they could prop up the administration of his government and consolidate his position as the King of England. William the Conqueror depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry, Wikipedia In order to ac ..read more
Visit website

Follow Museum of Oxford Blog on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR