Scientists and Indigenous leaders team up to conserve seals and an ancestral way of life at Yakutat, Alaska
The Conversation » Arctic
by Aron L. Crowell, Arctic Archaeologist, Smithsonian Institution, Judith Dax̱ootsú Ramos, Assistant Professor of Northwest Coast Arts, University of Alaska Southeast
1w ago
Ancestral seal hunting happened at the edge of the Sít Tlein (Hubbard) glacier. Emily Kearney-Williams © Smithsonian Institution Five hundred years ago, in a mountain-rimmed ocean fjord in southeast Alaska, Tlingit hunters armed with bone-tipped harpoons eased their canoes through chunks of floating ice, stalking seals near Sít Tlein (Hubbard) glacier. They must have glanced nervously up at the glacier’s looming, fractured face, aware that cascades of ice could thunder down and imperil the boats – and their lives. As they drew near, they would have asked the seals to give themselves as food fo ..read more
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A shocking 79% of female scientists have negative experiences during polar field work
The Conversation » Arctic
by Rebecca Duncan, PhD Candidate in Polar Marine Ecology and Climate Change, University of Technology Sydney
1w ago
Rebecca Duncan Every day, women are working on frontier science in Earth’s unforgiving polar environments. Our study, published today in PLOS Climate, investigated what their experiences are actually like. Fieldwork in the Arctic and Antarctica is a critical part of the scientific research that’s addressing the unprecedented challenges of global climate change. It ranges from day trips to living onboard research ships in the Arctic and Southern Oceans, to spending months at research bases in the polar regions. Women play a critical role in just about all of it. They take on fieldwork roles fr ..read more
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Chinese scientists are increasingly shaping the future of the Arctic amid China’s rising presence
The Conversation » Arctic
by Mathieu Landriault, Professeur associé/Adjunct professor, École nationale d'administration publique, École nationale d'administration publique (ENAP)
1w ago
Scientists are playing a significant role in the Arctic region, helping to educate the world about its unique ecosystem along with the ongoing geopolitical positioning by Arctic and non-Arctic states. Scientific research has been central in helping determine the boundaries of the continental shelf in the Arctic region to establish which states can exploit any natural resources found in the area. Arctic states are spending millions trying to document their territorial claims. The scientific data has been presented to experts at the United Nations Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shel ..read more
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Zombie fires in the Arctic smoulder underground and refuse to die – what’s causing them?
The Conversation » Arctic
by Sebastian Wieczorek, Professor (Chair) and Head of Applied Mathematics, University College Cork, Eoin O'Sullivan, PhD Candidate in Applied Mathematics, University College Cork, Kieran Mulchrone, Senior Lecturer, School of Mathematical Sciences, University College Cork
2w ago
Fire in boggy peat-based tundra in Alaska. Western Arctic National Parklands / flickr So-called “zombie fires” in the peatlands of Alaska, Canada and Siberia disappear from the Earth’s surface and smoulder underground during the winter before coming back to life the following spring. These fires puzzle scientists because they appear in early May, way ahead of the usual fire season in the far north, and can reignite for a number of years. Most scientists believe that zombie fires are the remnants of fires on the surface, but we have identified an alternative cause. Our research suggests that ra ..read more
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Defence policy update focuses on quantum technology’s role in making Canada safe
The Conversation » Arctic
by Claire Parsons, Researcher, Centre for International and Defence Policy, Queen's University, Ontario
1M ago
The recent release of the Department of National Defence’s policy update, Our North, Strong and Free, outlines the progress being made by the federal government on two major security issues facing Canada: the warming Arctic and cyber warfare. A major focal point of the policy update is the need to develop cutting-edge, quantum-based defence technology that will help Canada address these two threats. Quantum technology uses the sensitivity of sub-atomic particles to create increasingly precise measurements of an environment. This provides Canada the ability to better track environmental changes ..read more
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Canada’s Arctic defence policy update: All flash, no bang
The Conversation » Arctic
by Paul T. Mitchell, Professor of Defence Studies, Canadian Forces College
2M ago
The Canadian government’s recent defence policy update, Our North: Strong and Free, was recently released with considerable fanfare. Promised for a year, the delay seemed to indicate the Liberal government’s budgetary pressures given the ballooning deficit. In the end, it was more heat than light and was less of an update to address a worsening international security environment than a simple restatement of traditional approaches to Canada’s defence. Announced by a joint team of the prime minister, deputy prime minister and both the defence and veterans affairs ministers — with a backdrop fram ..read more
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Arctic rivers face big changes with a warming climate, permafrost thaw and an accelerating water cycle − the effects will have global consequences
The Conversation » Arctic
by Michael A. Rawlins, Associate Director, Climate System Research Center and Associate Professor of Climatology, UMass Amherst, Ambarish Karmalkar, Assistant Professor of Geosciences, University of Rhode Island
3M ago
Water from the Mackenzie River, seen from a satellite, carries silt and nutrients from land to the Arctic Ocean. Jesse Allen/NASA Earth Observatory As the Arctic warms, its mighty rivers are changing in ways that could have vast consequences – not only for the Arctic region but for the world. Rivers represent the land branch of the earth’s hydrological cycle. As rain and snow fall, rivers transport freshwater runoff along with dissolved organic and particulate materials, including carbon, to coastal areas. With the Arctic now warming nearly four times faster than the rest of the world, the reg ..read more
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Global warming may be behind an increase in the frequency and intensity of cold spells
The Conversation » Arctic
by Beatriz Monge-Sanz, Senior Researcher, Department of Physics, University of Oxford
3M ago
bennphoto / Shutterstock Global warming caused by increased concentrations of greenhouse gases is already affecting our lives. Scorching summers, more intense heatwaves, longer drought periods, more extended floods, and wilder wildfires are consequences linked to this warming. One less obvious consequence of global warming is also getting growing attention from scientists: a potential increase in the intensity and frequency of winter cold snaps in the northern hemisphere. Weather phenomena like the Beast from the East in winter 2018, the cold spell of Arctic air that reached as far South as Te ..read more
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How climate change is messing up the ocean’s biological clock, with unknown long-term consequences
The Conversation » Arctic
by Frédéric Cyr, Adjunct Professor, Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland
3M ago
A satellite image of a phytoplankton bloom off the coast of St. John's, N.L. (NASA, MODIS Rapid Response) Every year in the mid-latitudes of the planet, a peculiar phenomenon known as the phytoplankton spring bloom occurs. Visible from space, spectacular large and ephemeral filament-like shades of green and blue are shaped by the ocean currents. The phytoplankton blooms are comprised of a myriad of microscopic algae cells growing and accumulating at the ocean’s surface as a result of the onset of longer days and fewer storms — often associated with the move into spring. Read more: How climate ..read more
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NATO Climate Change and Security Centre of Excellence to open in Montréal: What does it mean for Canadian security?
The Conversation » Arctic
by Ryan Atkinson, Postdoctoral Fellow, Defence Policy, Carleton University
4M ago
NATO's Climate Change and Security Centre of Excellence (CCASCOE) is set to open this year in Montréal. (Shutterstock) This year Montréal is set to become the home for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s new Climate Change and Security Centre of Excellence (CCASCOE). The CCASCOE, as the name would suggest, is set to provide specific expertise on the environment and the impacts of climate change for NATO security. When announcing the new centre, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau declared it will “enable Canada, NATO allies, and other global partners to understand and address the serious securi ..read more
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