Story of Sue San : Hong Kong Opera Blues 
Diabolique Magazine
by Camille Zaurin
2w ago
Hong Kong film history, though often discussed, often appears to begin at the end of the 1950s,  with the establishment of the Shaw Brothers studio. One cannot help but wonder what came before and what it looked like. Sadly, very little of Hong Kong’s film output prior to the Japanese occupation, which started in ’41, remains – it is rumored to have been disposed of during the occupation as the Japanese scrounged for resources. Yet Hong Kong’s film history goes back to the very roots of cinema – as early as 1896, the Lumiere brothers visited the colony to show off the capabilities of thei ..read more
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King and Queen of the Deathmatch: The Wrestling Films of Takashi Miike
Diabolique Magazine
by Thomas Nul
2w ago
During a 2004 round table discussion with fellow directors Guillermo Del Toro and Eli Roth, Takashi Miike discussed his earliest days working in “V-Cinema” or Japan’s direct-to-video genre film market. Having worked as a freelance assistant director for ten years before helming his first film (1), Miike explained his early working methods, noting to Roth and Del Toro that the major Japanese film studios, “had all their crew on payrolls, that was the way we made films” (1). “But I was freelance,” Miike continued, “and we shot many things studio people did not want to work on like tight deadline ..read more
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Challenge of the Masters : The Rise of Master Liu  
Diabolique Magazine
by Camille Zaurin
2w ago
It is a common assumption that kung fu and Hong Kong cinema are, and have always been indissociable. This, of course, is impossible to verify, as most, if not all, of the films produced in the early years of Hong Kong cinema are thought to have been melted down for chemicals during the Japanese occupation of the colony between ’41 and ’45. As such, the earliest record of any kung fu movie (or “kung fu pian”) we have dates back to 1949 when Peng Hu directed Story of Wong Fei Hung¸ starring Kwan Tak Hing. Wong  Fei Hung was an icon of popular Cantonese culture who lived and practiced martia ..read more
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Jean Rollin and The Duality of Male & Female: The Iron Rose (La rose de fer, 1973)
Diabolique Magazine
by Jerome Reuter
1M ago
The films of Jean Rollin are among the most unique. They exist in a postmodern world of vampirism, surrealism, and sexuality, which is utilized to do much more than excite the audience but display the hedonism of libertinage and vulnerability. Fascination (1979) depicts the excesses of the ruling class. So much so that one might have thought it was ripped from the pages of Juliette by The Marquis de Sade. In contrast, Night of the Hunted (La nuit des traquées, 1980) allowed sexuality to express both vulnerability and victimization.  Some might dismiss Rollin’s work altogether as nothing m ..read more
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Working the Ditch: (the) Melvins’ Tarantula Heart (2024)
Diabolique Magazine | Indulge your Passion for the Macabre!
by Thomas Nul
2M ago
While announcing the release of Tarantula Heart, the Melvins (stylized as “(the) Melvins”) released a statement describing the album as “quite possibly the band’s most unconventional, catchiest and imaginative work yet,” (1) – certainly a massive statement to be uttered by anyone regarding a Melvins album. Such words however, and the album in question, take on greater significance when stated in the band’s own press release, which notes the Melvins’ “legacy celebrated for its eccentric and extraordinary output,” (1). Though typically associated with sludge, doom and drone metal as well as alte ..read more
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ASSASSIN OF THE LIGHT: DARIO ARGENTO’S DARK GLASSES (2022)
Diabolique Magazine | Indulge your Passion for the Macabre!
by Thomas Nul
3M ago
Long past the point of having anything to prove as a director, the decade long hiatus between Dracula 3D (2012) and 2022’s Dark Glasses marked the longest gap between films for Dario Argento. Despite Argento’s work since the 90’s and onward having become more divisive among fans and popular critical reception having turned increasingly against him, Argento nevertheless remained active, averaging no more than three years in-between contentious features such as Trauma (1993), The Stendhal Syndrome (La sindrome di Stendhal, 1996), The Phantom of the Opera (Il fantasma dell’opera, 1998), Sleepless ..read more
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MEISTER AND MUSIC VIDEO: THE DANZIG DIRECTORIAL ARCHIVE
Diabolique Magazine | Indulge your Passion for the Macabre!
by Thomas Nul
4M ago
Though a musician and songwriter first and foremost, and one with a rather monumental influence in said fields (the cultural ubiquity of the Misfits’ skull iconography alone is testament to that influence), Glenn Danzig has also long been multitasking into other mediums. “… even before getting involved in all the bands I’ve been in, I went to [the] New York Institute of Photography,” stated Danzig in 2005 (1), having studied film, photography and art (2). An avid comic book reader and collector, Danzig’s infamous 1994 foray into adult-themed comic writing and publishing, the Verotik imprint, w ..read more
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Tender: Review and Interview with the author and artist Beth Hetland
Diabolique Magazine | Indulge your Passion for the Macabre!
by Niina Doherty
5M ago
Beth Hetland is not necessarily a name most horror fans have yet heard of, but her upcoming solo debut graphic novel Tender might just change that. With a bachelor’s degree in fine arts (with emphasis on comics) from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a Masters degree in the same field from The Center for Cartoon Studies, Hetland is well-versed in the world of comics and graphic novels (not that she makes a distinction between the two). Besides being a professor and teaching various comic-related courses at her old alma mater of SAIC, Hetland is a prolific artist with a vast body o ..read more
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Frankenstein, Help Me: The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)
Diabolique Magazine | Indulge your Passion for the Macabre!
by Dave J. Wilson
5M ago
Hammer Films and director Terence Fisher (1904 – 1980) made their first foray into Gothic horror with The Curse of Frankenstein (1957), their loose adaptation of Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. It gave them their biggest financial success, as it earned a worldwide box office gross of $8 million on an estimated budget of $270,000. While it was a smash hit, it was met with outrage in its native UK from overreacting mainstream film critics, as the gore in Eastmancolor repulsed them, but it was received more warmly stateside. The Gothic revival had begun, but thi ..read more
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COME TO SILVER: GLENN DANZIG’S DEATH RIDER IN THE HOUSE OF VAMPIRES (2021)
Diabolique Magazine | Indulge your Passion for the Macabre!
by Thomas Nul
5M ago
In sharp contrast to the May 2016 announcement of Glenn Danzig, Jerry Only and Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein reuniting to perform again – a reunion of the original Misfits band long thought an impossibility by many Misfits and Danzig fans – the announcement of Danzig’s feature filmmaking debut Verotika (2019) was an inevitability. While Danzig’s love of horror, occult and Satanic themes have manifested lyrically throughout the original Misfits, Samhain and Danzig bands, as well as through Danzig’s adult-themed comic book imprint Verotik founded in 1994, Danzig admitted “I want to put my mark ..read more
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