How America’s Premier Theologian Interpreted God’s Providence after Lincoln Was Assassinated
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Justin Taylor
1w ago
On July 13, 2024, former President Donald Trump was very nearly assassinated on live television by a sniper’s bullet. Historian Niall Ferguson writes: A slight gust of wind, a tremor of the assassin’s hand, an unexpected move by the former president—for whatever tiny reason, Trump lived to fight another day. As the editors of National Review wrote: If the bullet that wounded Trump had traveled a slightly different path, we would have witnessed earlier this evening one of the most horrifying events in American history. It would have deepened the sense of crisis gripping our country and would h ..read more
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The Man Who Introduced American Evangelicals to C. S. Lewis
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Justin Taylor
1M ago
Clyde S. Kilby joined the faculty of Wheaton College in 1935 at the age of 33 as an assistant professor of English and dean of men. In 1943 Kilby read a new book published by C. S. Lewis, entitled The Case for Christianity, which changed the course of his life. It was based on two series of broadcast talks Lewis had given for the BBC and was later published as the first two sections of Mere Christianity. “I . . . read it right through feeling almost from the first sentence that something profound had touched my mind and heart.” It was like discovering “something bottomless,” and he was captiva ..read more
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A Christian Nation? Religion, Institutions, and the Early Republic
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Thomas Kidd
1M ago
In this post I am interviewing Dr. Miles Smith, assistant professor of history at Hillsdale College, about his new book Religion and Republic: Christian America from the Founding to the Civil War. [TK] Your book suggests that America was Christian between the Revolution and Civil War, but maybe not in the ways that evangelical partisans suggest. How so? [MS] The United States can safely be called Christian between the founding and the Civil War because its citizenry understood that the American republic’s civil, cultural, educational, and social institutions had Christian foundations. There wa ..read more
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The Desegregation of Dallas Theological Seminary
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Thomas Kidd
2M ago
This guest post is from Shawn Varghese. Varghese earned a PhD from the University of Texas at Dallas, and a ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary. The year 2024 commemorates the centennial of the founding of Dallas Theological Seminary. Founders including Lewis Sperry Chafer envisioned a school that would preserve an orthodox view of Scripture and Christian doctrine, within DTS’s distinct commitment to dispensational theology. Through its initial five decades, the seminary welcomed students from around the globe who aspired to study the Scriptures. Notably absent from this diverse cohort, howev ..read more
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A New History of the Baptist Mission in Burma
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Obbie Tyler Todd
5M ago
This guest post is by Obbie Tyler Todd, who originally published a longer version of this review at the Journal of Religious History.  The history of missionary movements has long been an inspiration to Christians of all kinds. Themes of faith, courage, sacrifice, and soul-winning can all be found in the accounts of men and women traveling to distant lands to proclaim the salvation of Jesus Christ. In particular, the story of Adoniram and Ann Judson, the first American Baptist overseas missionaries, is immortalized in evangelical lore. Courtney Anderson’s To the Golden Shore: The Life of ..read more
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Choosing a Christian College: An In-Depth Guide
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Thomas Kidd
8M ago
Today’s post is from Dr. Perry Glanzer. He is professor of Educational Foundations at Baylor University and the editor-in-chief of Christian Scholar’s Review. Professor Glanzer is the author of books including the newly-released Christian Higher Education: An Empirical Guide. A few years ago, I wrote a guest essay for this blog entitled “A Guide to Choosing a Christian College.” After its publication, I received dozens of e-mails from parents who wanted additional help choosing a Christian university. All of them mentioned a problem similar to what this parent articulated: “My daughter is ..read more
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The Reformers Were Not Innovators: An Interview with Matthew Barrett
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Thomas Kidd
1y ago
In this post I am interviewing my colleague Matthew Barrett about his new book The Reformation as Renewal: Retrieving the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church.  Dr. Barrett is Professor of Christian Theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City. He is also the Director of the Center for Classical Theology and the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. [TK] The Reformation as Renewal is clearly a monumental new assessment of the Reformation. Why did you write this book? [MB] John Henry Newman once said, “To be deep in history is to cease to ..read more
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How Three Friends Dropped Out of Princeton Theological Seminary, Joined the Inaugural Class of Fuller Theological Seminary, and Changed Evangelicalism
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Justin Taylor
1y ago
Daniel Fuller died on June 21, 2023, at the age of 97. In my 2015 doctoral dissertation at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary on the four key influences on John Piper’s life and thought, I have a chapter dedicated to Fuller’s story and his influence. One of the interesting things about Fuller’s early life is that two of his best friends, Bill Bright and Ralph Winter, would go on to become two of the most influential post-war evangelicals in the areas of evangelism and missiology. And three of them all started seminary education together. Navigators and Bible Memorization Daniel Payton F ..read more
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Confessions of Faith and the Baptist Tradition
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Thomas Kidd
1y ago
One of the most-cited arguments against Baptist standards of doctrine and practice is that Baptists have historically opposed confessions of faith. This anti-confessional argument has been used by certain Baptist leaders over the centuries, but it is a false argument. Confessions have been a consistent feature of Baptist life since the 1600s, though Baptists have often disagreed about the content of these statements of faith. The latest version of the anti-confessional argument comes from Pastor Rick Warren. His Saddleback Church is protesting the decision of the Southern Baptist Executive Com ..read more
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Giving It All and Getting It All: Puritan Women and Their Spiritual Practices
The Gospel Coalition Blog » Evangelical History
by Thomas Kidd
1y ago
Today’s guest post is from Jenny-Lyn de Klerk (PhD, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary). She is the author of 5 Puritan Women: Portraits of Faith and Love (Crossway, 2023) and has contributed to the Essential Lexham Dictionary of Church History (Lexham, 2022). She works as an editor at Crossway and you can follow her on Twitter at @puritanjenny. When I first started reading Puritan women, I was not surprised that they wrote about spiritual practices. They were, of course, Puritans! Holiness, discipline, and zeal were in their theological DNA. But I was surprised to find that they often re ..read more
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