The FDA Should Stop Letting Drug Companies Skip Steps
The Incidental Economist
by Katherine O'Malley
1w ago
Recent headlines have highlighted the Food and Drug Administration’s accelerated approval program for new drugs, sowing doubt that treatments approved this way actually work. While the program has expedited many life-saving treatments for terminal and rare diseases, there are serious challenges ensuring the mandatory confirmatory clinical trials are completed after approval. What can we do to get these trials back on track? I wrote about this in The Boston Globe today: “When drugs receive accelerated approval, they go to market and companies immediately start profiting. The Office of the Insp ..read more
Visit website
The MISSION Act Scribes Pilot: Implementation and Costs
The Incidental Economist
by Elsa Pearson Sites
1w ago
Medical scribes are nonclinical support staff dedicated to clinical documentation during medical visits, allowing the provider to focus on the patient. Existing research shows that scribes can improve provider productivity and satisfaction and minimize the time they spend on documentation. When the MISSION Act passed in 2018, one section of the law required the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to conduct a two-year medical scribes pilot. The goal was to determine how medical scribes impact VHA clinic function. The pilot was implemented in emergency departments and cardiology and orthopedic ..read more
Visit website
What Kind of Exercise Is Best for Depression?
The Incidental Economist
by Tiffany Doherty
2w ago
We already know exercise is good for us, including our mental health, but we still have some questions. Like, what kind of exercise is best? And at what intensity?    The post What Kind of Exercise Is Best for Depression? first appeared on The Incidental Economist ..read more
Visit website
Oil pulling: promises so sweet, what’s it doing to my teeth?
The Incidental Economist
by Brian Stanley
3w ago
The ancient practice of oil pulling is being repackaged for the digital age. Are the lies about it getting resold as well? Oil pulling – swishing an unrefined oil in your mouth for 10-20 minutes to “pull” bacteria from the mouth has recently gained popularity on TikTok. It’s not a new concept though. Articles report that oil pulling first showed up in Ayurvedic medicine thousands of years ago. Ayurvedic medicine is a traditional medicine practice that focuses on balance and natural remedies. It’s still practiced around the world, but the evidence for it is scattered and inconclusive. This is i ..read more
Visit website
Medicare’s fiscal cliff
The Incidental Economist
by Elsa Pearson Sites
3w ago
The recent good news is that the bankruptcy date for Medicare’s hospital care coverage fund was pushed back a few years to 2036. The bad news is that this temporary reprieve is just that, plus it doesn’t even address the financial situation of the rest of Medicare. I wrote about this for the Boston Globe today: There are 67 million Americans currently on Medicare. Ninety percent of them are over 65 and the country’s population is aging quickly. By 2040, it’s estimated that 80 million Americans will be over 65. That’s an extra 13 million people on Medicare’s rolls. It’s simpl ..read more
Visit website
Recent Research: Aging, Dementia, and the Risk of Becoming Homebound
The Incidental Economist
by Katherine O'Malley
3w ago
As more Americans cross into older age, the risk of dementia increases and so, too, does the risk of becoming homebound. This presents an access to care problem not only for aging adults and their families, but also for our health care system to successfully serve those patients. While there are home-based primary care and community programs that reach homebound individuals with dementia, the demand for them far outstrips supply. There’s incentive, then, to better understand what factors contribute to becoming homebound for people living with dementia beyond well-established contributors like ..read more
Visit website
Is Acetaminophen Safe for Pregnant People?
The Incidental Economist
by Tiffany Doherty
3w ago
We’ve got new and improved data on the relationship between acetaminophen use during pregnancy and diagnoses of Autism, ADHD, and Intellectual Disability in offspring. Have we been right or wrong to recommend it during pregnancy?    The post Is Acetaminophen Safe for Pregnant People? first appeared on The Incidental Economist ..read more
Visit website
Reminder: HSR Call for Abstracts on the Role of Health Services Research in Advances in Cancer Prevention and Control
The Incidental Economist
by Austin Frakt
1M ago
Cross-posted from the Health Services Research website. Sponsored by: Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine Submission deadline for abstracts: Monday 17 June 2024 Health Services Research (HSR) and the Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine are partnering to publish a Special Issue on The Role of Health Services Research in Cancer Prevention and Control. The special issue will be edited by Kevin Schulman, MD, Roger Anderson, PhD, Xin Hu, PhD, and Asal Pilehvari, PhD. Paradigm shifts in cancer scre ..read more
Visit website
Stopping ‘Brain Waste’ for Foreign-born Workers in the US
The Incidental Economist
by Katherine O'Malley
1M ago
Immigration is top-of-mind for voters heading into the 2024 presidential election and so, too, is the economy and our workforce. For highly educated, highly skilled immigrants, entering the workforce and obtaining high-wage work can feel impossible. Brain waste is to blame. I have a new piece out in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette looking at this phenomenon and ways we can better match skilled immigrants with high-wage jobs. In 2020, over 260,000 immigrants with undergraduate health care degrees such as nursing were underemployed. How might this untapped group of health professionals hav ..read more
Visit website
Qualitative Brief: Better Understanding VA Urgent Care Delivery
The Incidental Economist
by Brian Stanley
1M ago
Rates of urgent care and emergency department usage have fluctuated over the years, largely increasing. However, as usage has increased, so have costs, and there is significant ongoing research on how to mitigate this trend. This is true within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) as well. For VHA, understanding how Veterans are referred into urgent care services and emergency departments will help policymakers better understand bottlenecks in non-emergency care services, hopefully reducing costs and improving Veteran access to high quality care. The Partnered Evidence-based Policy Resourc ..read more
Visit website

Follow The Incidental Economist on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR