Battling Broad Mite in Spring Crops
On Floriculture
by Sarah Jandricic, Greenhouse Floriculture IPM Specialist, OMAFRA
3d ago
Broad mite, Polyphagotarsonemus latus. Photo credit: USDA BARC Broad Mites (Polyphagotarsonemus latus) seem to be a regular occurrence nowadays in spring crops, especially Reiger begonias and New Guinea impatiens. Other crops that are commonly affected include torenia, exacum, ipomea and gerbera.   Broad mite are often difficult to detect and control. Read on for tips on monitoring and the latest management strategies for this pest. Monitoring Unfortunately, broad mite’s small size (0.2 mm) means that spotting the mite is near impossible using just a hand lens.  Damage ..read more
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Thrips Identification Workshop for Growers: Coming to an Ontario Town Near YOU!
On Floriculture
by Sarah Jandricic, Greenhouse Floriculture IPM Specialist, OMAFRA
2w ago
It’s no secret that recent outbreaks of thrips species other than western flower thrips (WFT) have made producing greenhouse crops in Ontario harder than usual. This includes species such as onion thrips, Thrips parvispinus, and chrysanthemum thrips. As control measures are different depending on the thrips species you’re dealing with, the very FIRST step in learning how to manage these pests is proper species identification. If you’re interested in having someone in your greenhouse operation learn how to do this (so you don’t have to rely on government specialists), then keep reading! Worksh ..read more
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In Case you Missed it: “A Pain in the Parvi” GrowON Webinar Recording (Plus, Another Thrips parvipsinus Webinar with GrowPro!)
On Floriculture
by Sarah Jandricic, Greenhouse Floriculture IPM Specialist, OMAFRA
3w ago
In case you missed the GrowON webinar by myself and Judy Colley from Plant Products on Jan 29th, we’ve now uploaded to Youtube! You can find it the ONFloriculture Youtube page, along with lots of other useful videos and webinars. Are recorded webinars not your thing? Well, then you have two additional options! 1. You can also watch me give a live GrowPro webinar on Feb 27th, hosted by the American Floral Endowment. This won’t be quite as in-depth as the material Judy and I presented together, but it will give you a good idea of where we are and where we’re going when it comes to Thrips parvis ..read more
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Agri-Tech Innovation Initiative Opening Feb 15th
On Floriculture
by Abigail Wiesner
3w ago
OMAFRA is pleased to announce the new Agri-Tech Innovation Initiative, with $25M in funding to support growth and productivity for producers and processors. Read about the program below or sign up for one of the virtual webinars to learn more. The Initiative will be delivered under three funding streams. Intake opens Feb 15th 2024 and closes March 28th 2024 at 11:00 am. Across the streams, cost-share funding ranges from 35-50% of total eligible project costs. For greenhouse producers, learn more about streams 1 and 2 and how you can apply. For full application guidelines visit the Agri-T ..read more
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Saving “Bank” with Banker Plants
On Floriculture
by Sarah Jandricic, Greenhouse Floriculture IPM Specialist, OMAFRA
1M ago
This guest post was written by Ashley Paling, a research technician at the Horticulture & Environmental Sciences Innovation Centre (HESIC) and part-time instructor at Niagara college. Banker plants can be an effective part of a greenhouse IPM program. Using biological controls to control aphids as part of an IPM strategy is a popular choice among growers (Jacob, 2023). Aphid parasitoids can, of course, be purchased weekly from suppliers. However this is an expensive option that leaves you at the mercy of waiting for weekly deliveries to control your greenhouse pests. Enter the Banker Plant ..read more
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Upcoming GrowON Webinar: “A Pain in the Parvi” – Progress on Thrips parvipsinus IPM
On Floriculture
by Sarah Jandricic, Greenhouse Floriculture IPM Specialist, OMAFRA
1M ago
Since it was first discovered in Ontario greenhouses in 2022, growers, IPM specialists, consultants, and technical reps have been joining forces to learn everything we can about what works – and what doesn’t – for this pest of tropical ornamentals. Join us for a GrowON webinar next Tuesday on real-world solutions for this pest from “boots on the ground” folks who’ve been working with this pest for 2 years in commercial operations in Ontario. Crops covered include mandevilla/diplodenia, hoya, anthurium and a few others. Webinar Details: Who: Our speakers are Judy Colley (IPM Technica ..read more
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Student Job Opportunity! Summer Research Assistant for 2024
On Floriculture
by Abigail Wiesner
2M ago
Interested in working with OMAFRA field specialists? Know a student who is? Read on to learn about the application process for a variety of student focused Summer Research Assistant positions available this summer. While many positions across Ontario are available, there are two positions based out of Vineland Ontario for those interested in working specifically with greenhouse floriculture crops. Be sure to indicated this (Summer Research Assistant – Greenhouse (2 located in Vineland)) on your application. View all position details and requirements at the following link: Ontario Public Servi ..read more
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Introducing Ontario’s Crop Protection Hub – Your One Stop Shop for Pesticide Information for Greenhouse Crops
On Floriculture
by Sarah Jandricic, Greenhouse Floriculture IPM Specialist, OMAFRA
3M ago
Are you a Canadian floriculture grower Planning your IPM program for Spring crops soon? Then look no further! Ontario’s new Crop Protection Hub combines pesticide data from a plethora of sources and combines them into one convenient location. Types of data (for both chemical and microbial insecticides/fungicides) include: Allowable pesticides by crop type (e.g. cut flowers, potted crops, unrooted cuttings) Rates, REIs, and maximum allowable sprays per crop Compatibility information with beneficial organisms Efficacy ratings of pest management products for specific greenhouse pests Recommenda ..read more
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Trap Plants as a Tool Against Thrips parvispinus in Tropicals
On Floriculture
by Sarah Jandricic, Greenhouse Floriculture IPM Specialist, OMAFRA
4M ago
Sweet alyssum (Lobularia) as a trap plant for T. parvispinus. Thrips parvispinus has become a serious pest of tropical ornamental crops in North American since 2020. Due to the severity of the damage, IPM strategies are needed to complement chemical control until an effective and economical biocontrol program can be developed for this pest. Mass trapping through traps, lures, or trap plants can be an effective strategy for thrips. We’ve already seen that mass trapping cards REALLY help with this pest (more on that, later). And, it seems that trap plants may also be an effective strategy when u ..read more
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Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SRED) tax incentives
On Floriculture
by Abigail Wiesner
4M ago
Are staff at your greenhouse conducting research, solving problems, and promoting development on site? Then you may be eligible for a tax incentive! Read more about the SRED program and how you can participate. Background: This federal program allows corporations, individuals, trusts, and partnerships to benefit by engaging in scientific research and experimental development. You may be eligible to: Claim a deduction against income Earn an investment tax credit (ITC) Many projects completed by greenhouse staff are eligible as long as specific requirements (WHY and HOW) are followed. Let’s b ..read more
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