Call for Papers: Early Career Workshop in Public Law, Labour Law, Migration & Asylum, and Human Rights
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
2d ago
SLS Sponsored Collaborative Workshop for PhD Candidates and Early Career Academics in Public Law, Labour Law, Migration & Asylum, and Human Rights Durham, 20 June 2024 We are pleased to announce a collaborative one-day workshop for PhD candidates and early career academics to be held on 20 June 2024 at Durham University. The workshop is jointly organised by the Public Law, Labour Law, Migration & Asylum, and Human Rights subject sections of the Society of Legal Scholars (SLS) and funded by the SLS Subject Sections Fund. The workshop is an exciting opportunity for researchers in one or ..read more
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Paul F Scott: Spying on Parliamentarians
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
4d ago
The Investigatory Powers (Amendment) Bill was introduced into Parliament before Christmas, starting in the House of Lords, to which it will shortly return for consideration of Commons amendments. Generally, the progress of the Bill, much of which implements recommendations made by Lord Anderson of Ipswich in his review of the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 of June 2023, has been smooth. This post considers an issue which has been the focus of a large portion of the attention the Bill has received during the Parliamentary process – the change being made to the law permitting the survei ..read more
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Joe Tomlinson, Angela Paul, and Jed Meers: Are Statutory Duties to Protect the ‘Vulnerable’ a Good Idea?
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
1w ago
The Work and Pensions Committee is conducting an inquiry on a highly important matter: how vulnerable welfare claimants are safeguarded by the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP), and whether changes ought to be made. In the course of this work, it has raised this important question: should the DWP be placed under a statutory duty for safeguarding vulnerable claimants? In posing this question, the Committee is contemplating joining in with a trend in contemporary public law: the proliferation of the concept of ‘vulnerability’. Much of the research on this trend has thus far focused on human ..read more
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Sanjit Nagi: A Future Constitutional Battleground? Expropriation, Compensation, and the Right to Peaceful Enjoyment of Property under the European Convention on Human Rights
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
1w ago
As it becomes clear the Labour Party is on course to win the next general election, greater attention is being paid to their intended programme for government. Despite the current leadership disowning policies from the 2017 and 2019 manifesto, the Labour Party remains committed to expropriation in a limited number of areas: renationalising the railways, publicly controlling aspects of energy, and reforming planning laws to obtain land for housing and prison building programmes. Moreover, considering the on-going water pollution crisis, the Labour Party have pledged to expand the power of ..read more
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Events: Solange 50th Anniversary Conference/ Global South Network lecture – Supreme Constitutional Court of Palestine
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
1w ago
Constitutionalism Beyond the State and the Role of Domestic Constitutional Courts 30-31 May 2024, WZB Berlin Social Science Centre Almost fifty years have passed since the German Federal Constitutional Court rendered one of its most widely discussed and influential decisions: Solange I. On May 29, 1974, the Court famously held that it would review European Community law by the standards of German constitutional law as long as the Community had not received a catalogue of fundamental rights, which is adequate in comparison with the catalogue contained in the German Basic Law. It is not our ..read more
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Call for Guest Editors of Public Law’s Annual Themed Analysis Section (2025)
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
3w ago
The Editorial Committee of Public Law invites Guest Editors to submit proposals for a themed set of ‘Analysis’ papers to be published in the April 2025 issue of the journal. This set of papers will follow publication—in April 2023—of the papers on ‘Government Outsourcing in the Modern Administrative State’ (curated by Joe Tomlinson (York) and Janina Boughey (UNSW)) and—in April 2024—of the collection on ‘Public Law and Vulnerability’ (brought together by Maria O’Sullivan (Deakin University) and Robert Thomas (University of Manchester). Themed ‘Analysis’ Sections One issue of Pub ..read more
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Ben Yong: Making Government Work, or ‘How I learned to stop worrying and love the Centre of Government’
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
3w ago
How should the Centre of government (i.e., No 10 and the Cabinet Office) organise itself so that it is effective and ensures effective government more generally? A recent report, Power with Purpose (PWP), by the Commission for the Centre of Government under the auspices of the Institute for Government, reminds us of the difficulties of managing and deploying public power.  PWP seems, at first glance, a rather technocratic report. It recommends changes to the machinery of government—that is, structures, institutional processes and functions, rather than values or people. It expli ..read more
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Conor Crummey : The Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill and the Judicial ‘Disapplication’ of Statutes
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
1M ago
The myriad problems with the Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill, as well as the policy that the Bill is supposed to facilitate, have been clearly documented. One common criticism is that the Bill would precipitate a ‘constitutional crisis’ by provoking the courts into refusing to recognise its legal effect. Adam Tucker argues that the Bill’s most problematic sections could very well ‘count as a novel entry in our canon of possible limits of parliamentary sovereignty’. Jeff King argues that the House of Lords would be justified in radical ..read more
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Madeline Gleeson & Theodore Konstadinides: The UK’s Rwanda policy and Lessons from Australia
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
1M ago
In November 2023, the Supreme Court of the UK dealt a critical blow to the government’s proposal to send certain asylum seekers to the Republic of Rwanda. In AAA and Others v the Home Secretary, the Court ruled that removal to Rwanda would be unlawful because that country was not, at the time, a ‘safe country’.  The government moved swiftly to address the concerns raised by this judgment, concluding a new treaty with Rwanda which seeks to render Rwanda ‘safe’ by establishing additional safeguards and guarantees. On 22 January 2024, in line with the recommenda ..read more
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Jamie McGowan: The Nobile Officium and Public Law: An Undertapped Resource?
UK Constitutional Law Association
by UKCLA
1M ago
Joanna Cherry KC MP has suggested (here and in parliament), somewhat indirectly, that the nobile officium of the Court of Session might, insofar as it “exists to give remedies where there would otherwise be none”, be exercised to limit the effect of the provisions of the Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill 2023-24. Notably, she tabled an amendment to prevent the bill from affecting the power of the Court of Session as set out in Article XIX of the Treaty of Union, which preserves the authority and privileges of the Court of Session, including its inherent supervisory jurisdiction a ..read more
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