Mummification and Moral Blindness
Practical Ethics
by Charles Foster
1w ago
By Charles Foster Image: The Great Sphinx and Pyramids of Gizeh (Giza), 17 July 1839, by David Roberts: Public Domain, via Wikimedia Commons Words are powerful. When a word is outlawed, the prohibition tends to chill or shut down debate in a wide area surrounding that word. That tendency is much discussed, but it’s not my concern here. It’s one thing declaring a no-go area: it’s another when the mere use or non-use of a word is so potent that it makes it impossible to see something that’s utterly obvious. There has recently been an excellent and troubling example. Some museums have started to ..read more
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Stoicism as a foundational component of ethics and existentialism
Practical Ethics
by Mette Høeg
2w ago
The Flammarion engraving, unknown artist Provided my eyes are not withdrawn from that spectacle, of which they never tire; provided I may look upon the sun and the moon and gaze at the other planets; provided I may trace their risings and settings, their periods and the causes of their travelling faster or slower; provided I may behold all the stars that shine at night – some fixed, others not travelling far afield but circling within the same area; some suddenly shooting forth, and others dazzling the eye with scattered fire, as if they are falling, or gliding past with a long trail of bla ..read more
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Guest Post: Body Shaming is Unacceptable, Even if Directed at Vile People. An Intersex Critique of “Small Dick Energy” 
Practical Ethics
by admin
3w ago
Guest post by Morgan Carpenter, bioethicist; co-founder and executive director, Intersex Human Rights Australia; Magda Rakita co-founder and executive director, Fundacja Interakcja (Poland), and co-chair, OII Europe; and Bo Laurent, founder, Intersex Society of North America We love Greta Thunberg. But we were hurt and disappointed that she chose “small dick energy” as a pejorative in her recent Twitter exchange with the self-proclaimed “misogynist influencer” Andrew Tate. This particular choice of words was not, in our view, the self-evidently praiseworthy retort that many progressive comment ..read more
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The New Relevance of Rationing
Practical Ethics
by Ben Davies
1M ago
By Ben Davies Decisions about how to allocate healthcare resources can be divided, somewhat crudely, into macro– and micro-level choices. Roughly speaking, macro-choices are policy choices, often made outside any clinical setting, e.g., by government. For instance, it is a macro-level choice which treatments to fund to what degree, and how large the health budget should be as a whole. Micro-choices are the choices people make with a particular budget, generally in clinical settings. For instance, it is a micro-level choice which patients to admit to intensive care, and how to prioritise indivi ..read more
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Moral Psychology at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics
Practical Ethics
by Joanna Demaree-Cotton
1M ago
Written by Joanna Demaree-Cotton   This last Michaelmas term marked the inaugural series of lab meetings for the Uehiro Centre’s BioXPhi lab (https://moralpsychlab.web.ox.ac.uk). Co-directed by myself and Dr. Brian Earp, the lab brings philosophers together with psychologists to conduct experimental studies in moral psychology and bioethics. Specifically, we investigate the contributing factors and psychological processes that shape:   Moral intuitions, judgments and reasoning Moral agency, moral action and moral motivation The structure and application of (bio)ethical concepts … w ..read more
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Guest Post: It has become possible to use cutting-edge AI language models to generate convincing high school and undergraduate essays. Here’s why that matters
Practical Ethics
by admin
1M ago
Written by: Julian Koplin & Joshua Hatherley, Monash University ChatGPT is a variant of the GPT-3 language model developed by OpenAI. It is designed to generate human-like text in response to prompts given by users. As with any language model, ChatGPT is a tool that can be used for a variety of purposes, including academic research and writing. However, it is important to consider the ethical implications of using such a tool in academic contexts. The use of ChatGPT, or other large language models, to generate undergraduate essays raises a number of ethical considerations. One of the ..read more
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Crosspost: Impostor syndrome and pretense
Practical Ethics
by Neil Levy
1M ago
Written by Neil Levy The original version of this article was published at New Work in Philosophy.   It’s hard to get any sort of reliable estimates of its prevalence, but impostor syndrome seems to be very widespread. Lots of people report feeling it, at least on occasion, and we might well suspect those who deny experiencing it of some sort of overcompensation. When someone we know reports feeling like an impostor, we’re often in a good position to testify that the feeling is unjustified. But reassurance from a friend or colleague isn’t much help, because they’d probably reassure us any ..read more
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Cross Post: Halving Subsidised Psychology Appoints is a Grave Mistake—Young Australians Will Bear a Significant Burden 
Practical Ethics
by admin
1M ago
Written by Dr Daniel D’Hotman, DPhil student studying mental health and ethics at the Oxford Uehiro Centre The original version of this article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Unprecedented times called for unprecedented measures. COVID-19 was the most significant health crisis many of us had ever faced. While the physical effects were much discussed, the mental health burden was arguably just as devastating. In response, the previous Government doubled subsidised mental health appointments under the Better Access Program, allowing Australians suffering from mental illnesses like an ..read more
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Abortion in Wonderland
Practical Ethics
by Charles Foster
2M ago
By Charles Foster     Image: Heidi Crowter: Copyright Don’t Screen Us Out Scene: A pub in central London John: They did something worthwhile there today, for once, didn’t they? [He motions towards the Houses of Parliament] Jane: What was that? John: Didn’t you hear? They’ve passed a law saying that a woman can abort a child up to term if the child turns out to have red hair. Jane: But I’ve got red hair! John: So what? The law is about the fetus. It has nothing whatever to do with people who are actually born. Jane: Eh? That’s the gist of the Court of Appeal’s recent decision in the c ..read more
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Simulate Your True Self
Practical Ethics
by Muriel Leuenberger
2M ago
Written by Muriel Leuenberger A modified version of this post is forthcoming in Think edited by Stephen Law. Spoiler warning: if you want to watch the movie Don’t Worry Darling, I advise you to not read this article beforehand (but definitely read it afterwards). One of the most common reoccurring philosophical thought experiments in movies must be the simulation theory. The Matrix, The Truman Show, and Inception are only three of countless movies following the trope of “What if reality is a simulation?”. The most recent addition is Don’t Worry Darling by Olivia Wilde. In this movie, the main ..read more
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