2024 Annual Uehiro Lectures: Professor Elizabeth Harman
Practical Ethics
by admin
1w ago
We were honoured to welcome Professor Elizabeth Harman, Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Philosophy and Human Values at Princeton University, to Oxford to deliver the 2024 Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics. The three-part lecture series, entitled “Love and Abortion”, took place in the H B Allen Centre, Keble College, on 25 April, 2 and 9 May 2024. What does love teach us about abortion?  How does love challenge our ideas about abortion?  How can love explain the importance of abortion? The engaging lectures were very well received, and each was followed by thoughtfu ..read more
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Practical Ethics Schools Day 2024
Practical Ethics
by Joanna Demaree-Cotton
1w ago
In March, we were delighted to have the finalists of our annual Practical Ethics and Responsibility Competition (PERC) arrive in Oxford for a day of ethics and debate. Our four teams were from The Royal Latin School, The Laurels School, and Westminster. They earned their place at the Schools Day through their winning video entries in which they outlined an argument on an ethical topic of their choice in just 4 minutes. They chose fascinating topics: whether individual soldiers are responsible for war crimes, whether voters are responsible for the actions of politicians, whether the criminal a ..read more
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Moral AI And How We Get There with Prof Walter Sinnott-Armstrong
Practical Ethics
by admin
2w ago
Can we build and use AI ethically? Walter Sinnott-Armstrong discusses how this can be achieved in his new book ‘Moral AI and How We Get There’ co-authored with Jana Schaich Borg & Vincent Conitzer. Edmond Awad talks through the ethical implications for AI use with Walter in this short video. With thanks to the Atlantic Institute XR Lab, Rhodes House, for allowing us to film with their GoBe Robot. For more information on the book please see the Penguin website here: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/317706/moral-ai-by-conitzer-jana-schaich-borg-walter-sinnott-armstrong-and-vincent/9780241454 ..read more
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Book Launch: Responsibility and Healthcare
Practical Ethics
by Gabriel De Marco
2w ago
written by Ben Davies and Gabriel De Marco Many illnesses that risk death or serious harm are at least partly due to behaviours such as smoking, lack of exercise, or extreme sports. The WHO notes that the global prevalence of preventable, noncommunicable diseases is rising, and accounts for a large proportion of deaths worldwide. Some argue that patients with such illnesses are responsible for them. Is that right? And if so, should healthcare providers treat patients differently on the basis of health-related behaviours? Should a healthcare system, for example, offer discounts to those who eng ..read more
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Would You Survive Brain Twinning?
Practical Ethics
by Dominic Wilkinson
3w ago
Imagine the following case: A few years in the future, neuroscience has advanced considerably to the point where it is able to artificially support conscious activity that is just like the conscious activity in a human brain. After diagnosis of an untreatable illness, a patient, C, has transferred (uploaded) his consciousness to the artificial substrate via a novel surgical procedure. His body has been buried. There are different ethical and philosophical questions that we might ask about this technology. For example, is uploading of consciousness a good idea? What would be the moral status of ..read more
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(Bio)technologies, human identity, and the Medical Humanities
Practical Ethics
by Alberto Giubilini
3w ago
Introducing two journal special issues and a conference Written by Alberto Giubilini Two special issues of the journals Bioethics and Monash Bioethics Review will be devoted to, respectively, “New (Bio)technology and Human Identity” and “Medical Humanities in the 21st Century” (academic readers, please consider submitting an article). Here I would like to briefly explain why those topics matter beyond strictly academic discussion. The first issue is, broadly, about our relationship with new technologies, particularly within healthcare, medicine, and the biosciences. A lot has been written and ..read more
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Do We Need To Measure Well-Being?
Practical Ethics
by Joseph Moore
3w ago
Written by Joseph Moore Gus O’Donnell, once the highest official in the British Civil Service and now a member of the House of Lords, has said, on the topic of well-being, ‘If you treasure it, measure it’.[1],[2] I’ve heard this slogan repeated by empirically-minded researchers of happiness, well-being and flourishing. And to anyone with a certain scientific (or scientistic) inclination, this practical principle may seem obviously quite sensible. Knowledge is knowledge and we ought to be measuring everything we can, no less so the most important things. Once we can properly measure how well pe ..read more
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Quasi-Refusal and Teens
Practical Ethics
by Dominic Wilkinson
1M ago
by Dominic Wilkinson In an interesting legal case earlier this year, the court held an emergency hearing about the medical care of a 16 year old, recently diagnosed with acute leukaemia. The hearing, conducted remotely in the middle of the night, was to decide whether she should have medical treatment imposed against her wishes. Should an “intelligent young person”, who had no diagnosed mental illness or condition affecting her brain, but who faced a real possibility of serious, even life threatening complications be allowed to refuse medical treatment? Treatment decisions and nearl ..read more
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Truthful Misinformation
Practical Ethics
by Neil Levy
2M ago
written by Neil Levy and Keith Raymond Harris There’s a lot of debate over the harms of misinformation today: whether it is more prevalent now than in the past, how often it misleads people, whether people act on misleading misinformation, and on whether the costs of content moderation or algorithmic depriorisation mightn’t be higher than the disease they aim to fight. This debate has focused, unsurprisingly, on false claims like “the 2020 election was stolen” or “Trump is a Russian agent”(misinformation, here, is more or less synonymous with fake news). In a new paper, we argue that ..read more
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Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics: The Moral Importance of Low Welfare Species
Practical Ethics
by admin
2M ago
This essay was the winner of the Graduate category of the 10th National Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics 2024. Written by Jakob Lohmar. Many people believe that we sometimes ought to produce one larger benefit rather than any number of smaller benefits. For example, many believe that in a choice between saving a human life and alleviating headaches, one always ought to prioritize the life, no matter the number of headaches.[1] Call the benefits that (no matter their number) cannot outweigh the saving of one human life “minor benefits” and the wellbeing differences that minor benefits am ..read more
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