A Gift of Rabbit Ears
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
1y ago
Today is the anniversary of our first Covid19 lockdown in France. We arrived home from our holiday in Crete at 2 pm, just two hours after the closure of all non-essential venues, with outings restricted to one hour a day for exercise and essential shopping. At the present, in Blois, mask-wearing is compulsory in built-up areas, while restaurants, cafés, bars, hypermarkets, museums and all cultural venues are closed and there is a curfew between 6 pm and 6 am. Vaccination has begun but we are too young and too healthy to qualify. The view from the Wedding Room at Blois Town Hall This morning, I ..read more
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Friday’s French: se rappeler, se souvenir, mémoire, souvenir – part #2
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
2y ago
In 2014, I wrote a post about the difference between se rappeler and se souvenir which has remained very popular with readers. However, I have had to update the framework of my blog since then (WordPress) and the answers and comments have disappeared. Remembering the dead on armistice day So here are possible translations of the four sentences in bold type: I try to remenber not to use “de” with se rappeler = J’essaie de me rappeler qu’il ne faut pas utiliser la préposition “de” avec se rappeler OR J’essaie de penser à ne pas utiliser “de” avec se rappeler. Which reminds me that rappeler has ..read more
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Happy New Year for 2021
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
2y ago
“The best laid plans of mice and men …” John Burns never said a truer word! We started the year with lots of travel plans and the first was a trip to Crete in March to break the winter blues. Covid 19 at that time was still a minor issue, although we did wear masks in the airport. After three most enjoyable days at a home exchange in Chania, we moved to Agios Nikolaos, by which time bars, restaurants and cultural venues had closed. Even though we were in an apartment, it wasn’t much fun. After visiting a 3500-year-old olive tree, there wasn’t much left to do and lockdown was about to start in ..read more
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WHY CAN’T I GET DECENT COFFEE IN FRANCE?
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
2y ago
This is a question I am often asked by disappointed Australians and Americans who are used to a very wide variety of coffee beverages and are surprised to see that France, with its café culture, does not seem to have good coffee. Autumn leaves in front of Café Nemours on Place Colette, one of the most iconic cafés in Paris Well, it’s a café culture, but not a coffee culture. In France, in a normal café, you can have expresse (or expresso – note the “x”), café long, café au lait, café crème, café noisette and cappuccino (but not always – I remember a café in a small town in Brittany where we ..read more
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How much does a certified (sworn) translation cost in France?
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
2y ago
Before I answer the question, a little terminology. Although many people say “sworn translation” and “traduction assementée”, the correct terms are “certified translation” and “traduction certifiée”. It’s the translator who is sworn or assermenté by the court, not the translation. Standing in front of the Appeal Court of Orléans before being sworn in First, what exactly is a sworn translator (traducteur assermenté)? In France, a sworn translator or “traducteur assermenté” is also an “expert judiciaire” and attached to either a Court of Appeal (Cour d’appel) or the Cour de Cassation (Court of ..read more
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Buying Property in France # 1 Finding your dream home
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
2y ago
Even when you speak the language and have lived your whole life in a country, buying a property can be stressful and challenging. Doing so in a foreign country makes it a little more complicated. I have lived in France for over 40 years and have been directly or indirectly involved in the sale or purchase of a large number of properties. Real estate rules have evolved over the years and regulations are much stricter than before. There are basically two ways of buying property in France: you can deal directly with the owner or go through a real estate agent or website. In both cases, the final ..read more
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Working from Home during Lockdown
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
2y ago
Having worked as a translator full-time at home since 1979, even during my children’s very long French school holidays, I am probably not suffering from the constraints of lockdown as much as other people. These are my basic rules:   1/ Get dressed immediately when you get up (this became a rule right at the beginning when I had a client turn up unexpectedly at my doorstep and I was still in my nightgear). 2/ Set up a dedicated work space, even if you do not have a lot of room. Avoid working in the bedroom if you possibly can (you’ll sleep better at night!). 3/ Make yourself work for an hour a ..read more
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Happy New Year for 2020
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
3y ago
This post was written early January but somehow didn’t get published! It started by saying that I was earlier this year than I was last year in wishing you all the best for the coming but I was sad to say that my ideas of writing more blog posts have not come to fruition! I do have more spare time than before but it is mostly spent on welcoming family and home exchange friends, gardening, going on holidays, cycling and making the most of our yearly pass to Château de Chenonceau! Our first trip of the year, in late March, was to Sicily which had been on my list for a long time. We rented a car ..read more
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FRENCH CHÂTEAU COUNTRY IN THE WINTER – THE LOIRE VALLEY
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
3y ago
Château de Chambord in the snow Not everyone can choose to come to France during the warmer months. Australians in particular often come at Christmas time during their summer holidays, willing to trade over-30-degree temperatures for under ten degrees. Many hope to find snow. Snow falls in the Loire Valley are highly variable. They rarely arrive for Christmas but there are exceptions such as in 2015. The most likely month for snow is February. While spring, summer and autumn may be more pleasant seasons to travel in, they do have the major drawback of being full of tourists and accommodation ..read more
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PROMESSE DE VENTE VERSUS COMPROMIS DE VENTE IN FRENCH PROPERTY SALES
Aussie in France
by Rosemary Kneipp
3y ago
All property transactions in France take place in two steps: first, after the seller has agreed to the price offer, the seller and buyer sign a promise to sell in the form of either a promesse de vente (unilateral promise to sell) or a compromis de vente (bilateral promise to sell). This can take place privately, in a real estate agency or in a notaire’s office. Then, usually about 3 months later, when all the conveyancing has been done, both parties sign the acte de vente to close the sale. The first time I purchased a property in France, in the early 1980s, I was told that it was better to ..read more
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