Tips for Growing Bamboo
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Pim Dickson
1M ago
Tips for Growing Bamboo Bamboo is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful, tolerant and low maintenance, structural foliage plants, which has real presence and deserves a place in any garden. With elegant canes (culms) in an amazing array of sizes and colours from purple-black, to red, golden-yellow and even green stripes, bamboo makes a lush, stylish and exotic looking backdrop to other garden plants. It does however have a reputation for being invasive, which is not the plants’ fault but rather a symptom of the wrong variety being chosen for the location. It’s just a case of doing a litt ..read more
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Best Small Shrubs for a Big Impact
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Pim Dickson
1M ago
Flowering shrubs are an invaluable addition to any garden and most are extremely low maintenance once established. They often flower profusely for a long period of time and many are hard to beat for pure visual impact. Those with smaller garden spaces, or those with gardens already packed to the brim with plants may be put off at the thought giving up a large amount of space to flowering shrubs, but happily that can be avoided. There are some fantastic, compact shrubs available that produce the most incredible floral displays despite their smaller size. These varieties also make ..read more
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Deadheading - A Simple Guide
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Pim Dickson
1M ago
Deadheading, the removal of spent blooms that are past their best, is one of those jobs a gardener can be doing several times a week but it is also one of the most rewarding. The results can be seen immediately, which is rare in gardening, and it really keeps the garden looking at its best. The more often you do it, the less time each session takes. It is also a perfect excuse to nip out for a few minutes of quiet mindfulness ‘me-time’ on a regular basis over the summer. Why Should I Deadhead Flowering Plants? Removing dead flower heads also prevents plants from setting seed and instead chann ..read more
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Activities for Budding Young Gardeners
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Pim Dickson
2M ago
Why is it good to get children growing? Research shows that gardening can help children of all ages lead more fulfilled, happier and healthier lives. It's an inexpensive way to gain many valuable life skills and a better understanding of how nature and the world around us works. Gardening teaches patience and in the case of vegetables, a new appreciation for the food on the table. Nothing encourages a healthy appetite more than having grown and picked the ingredients themselves, along with the eye-opening flavours of super-fresh fruit and vegetables. Great Points to Learn Many ..read more
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What should I do after my spring bulbs have flowered?
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Pim Dickson
2M ago
Spring flowering bulbs like daffodils and tulips are one of the great joys of gardening and create the most perfect welcome to spring. Their fleeting nature just makes it more special, so all too soon the moment has passed, and our attention turns to towards flowers for summer. This raises the question of what’s best to do with those daffodils and tulips that have already done their bit. Many of us will want to clear the space for new flowers but retain the bulbs for a repeat of the spring show. For those bulbs to flower well next year they must be left to grow on and renew their ene ..read more
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The Chelsea Chop - with Darlac Tools
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Pim Dickson
3M ago
What is the ‘Chelsea Chop’? Simply put, the ‘Chelsea Chop’ is the pruning of herbaceous perennials to improve and control their shape and flowering. A good time to do this is late spring, often around the time of the Chelsea Flower Show, hence the name. At this point, perennial plants are growing strongly after their winter dormant period and will grow back vigorously. Why do the 'Chelsea Chop'? By cutting back herbaceous perennials with a ‘Chelsea Chop’ you can improve their shape and extend their flowering period. Each newly cut stem will develop side shoots, significantly in ..read more
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Dreaming of Dahlias
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Graham Rice
3M ago
There’s nothing more cheering than to look up some summer colour on the Mr F website and dream about dahlias. You know what I’m going to say next don’t you: order tubers now before they sell out. I’ve just been drooling over the forty plus Dahlia tuber varieties Mr F are offering at the moment… Over at Mr F HQ the team grows a trial of dahlias every year, helping them choose the best new varieties to add to the range and also helping to decide if some varieties need retiring. Mr Fothergil's team and I are obviously on the same wavelength because they've chosen tw ..read more
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The Captivating World of Clematis
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Pim Dickson
3M ago
Unbeatable for sheer flower power combined with the size of their blooms, these easy to grow, vivacious climbers are so full of vitality and energy, they never fail to bring a garden to life. Whether grown over an obelisk in patio containers, covering pergolas, archways, hiding a garden shed or decorating large areas of wall, there is a perfect variety for just about every situation. With early, late, and repeat flowering varieties available, Clematis can be used to create genuinely jaw-dropping displays that continue from late spring right through into autumn. It is no wonder they h ..read more
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Classic hardy annuals for kids and grown-ups
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Graham Rice
3M ago
At the very start of our gardening lives, often as our parents try to get us interested in gardening for the first time, we’re encouraged to sow seeds of hardy annuals. Flowers whose seeds you can sow outside and in the garden and which will flower in a few months’ time. My mum took a different approach starting me off with radishes because they’re ready to eat so quickly. Bad move. I spat them out – put me off gardening for years. She should have tried hardy annuals instead. They take a little longer but the reward is far far greater. But whether you’re trying to tempt your kids or grandkids ..read more
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April Gardening Advice
Mr Fothergill's blog
by Pim Dickson
3M ago
 This is the month we can take our foot off the brake and dive headlong into sowing and planting. However an overnight frost can undo all our hard work so proceed with caution and be ready with a fleece or cloche to cover up your most precious plants if necessary. The days may feel balmier but Jack Frost is still waiting in the wings and will take great delight in scuppering your plans. In the flower garden WEEDS  At the first sign of warmth weeds will make their presence felt. Young developing plants need all the nutrients they can get so don’t let them lose out to weeds ..read more
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