How can you help someone with PTSD?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
If you know a person who recently had a traumatic experience, you can help them bounce back . Reach out to them. Don’t force them to talk; just let them know you will be there whenever they are ready to open up. You don’t have to be somber all the time around them—in fact, showing a can help some survivors cope better with their feelings. Don’t take it personally if they prefer not to talk to you about the trauma; sometimes people need to feel like life goes on, and they can have normal relationships that aren’t defined by their post-traumatic stress disorder.   ..read more
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How does psychedelic-assisted treatment for PTSD work?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
MDMA (also known as ecstasy or Molly) can help patients with PTSD reconsolidate traumatic memories. PTSD sufferers experience unpredictable flashbacks to the traumatic event and often re-live the same stress, fear, and other negative emotions as if they are happening in real-time. Given in combination with therapy,  psychedelics help patients get the emotional distance from their traumatic memories that they need in order to process them and heal.    ..read more
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What is mantram repetition therapy for PTSD?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
Mantram repetition therapy is a type of therapy that is used to help calm people and shield them from the effects of intrusive thoughts. It involves repeating a “mantram”—a meaningful word or phrase—in order to tolerate negative thoughts and feelings without reacting to them. Mantram repetition appears to be a promising additional therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder , enabling PTSD sufferers to slow down reactivity patterns and direct their in more healthy ways without having to engage with their traumatic memories ..read more
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Does post-traumatic stress disorder show up on a brain scan?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
Yes, the brain scans of people with PTSD are different than those without this condition. For starters, the hippocampus (the center of memories and emotions in the brain) shows reduced volume, and heightened activity appears in the amygdala (which is involved in the body’s fear response). However, it’s important to note that from brain scans. Only a medical professional can diagnose post-traumatic stress disorder based on a patient’s clinical symptoms ..read more
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What is trauma-informed therapy?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
Trauma-informed therapists recognize the signs of PTSD and focus on treating the whole person. They understand that someone’s experiences, particularly traumatic ones, can affect their entire lives, increasing their risk of physical and mental health issues. Trauma-informed therapists apply their knowledge of trauma and its effects in treating patients, with an eye to avoiding re-traumatization. However, trauma experts caution not to fall for : Not all individuals who have experienced trauma develop PTSD, and PTSD is not necessarily the main causal factor in future problems, such as incarcerat ..read more
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How does PTSD affect normal brain functioning?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
In response to an overactive amygdala and underactive prefrontal cortex, the brain releases large amounts of norepinephrine in the presence of perceived danger. This in several ways, leading to hyperarousal, hypervigilance, and increased wakefulness and disrupted sleep. PTSD sufferers may also find that when they are emotionally aroused, they have little control over their reactive anger and impulsive behaviors. The weight of negative emotions such as fear and anger can diminish positive feelings and create problems at work and in personal relationships ..read more
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What brain regions are involved in PTSD?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
PTSD is a whole-brain disorder that involves the brain circuits of fear, stress, and anxiety . The amygdala (which sets off the fight-or-flight response) becomes . Meanwhile, the prefrontal cortex (the CEO, or center of the brain) grows sluggish or lacks sufficient neural connections with the amygdala to calm down the fear response. In people with PTSD, the hippocampus (the verbal memory center) tends to be smaller than normal and yet more active in response to perceived threats.   ..read more
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What makes people vulnerable to PTSD?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
While it’s impossible to predict a person’s response to trauma, certain risk factors can make it harder for some people to cope and thus more likely for them to develop post-traumatic stress disorder. These can include problems managing emotions, the presence of other mental health conditions, (e.g., parental separation or death, financial difficulty, a dysfunctional family), and having previously survived one or more traumatic incidents. Women have higher rates of PTSD than men . Professions where individuals are exposed to stress and danger on a regular basis, such as law enforcement and med ..read more
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How do I know if I have PTSD?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
is that everyone who goes through trauma will develop post-traumatic stress disorder. While it’s completely normal to experience PTSD-like symptoms immediately following a traumatic event, these usually resolve within a month, especially if the individual receives strong emotional support. PTSD symptoms often overlap with acute stress disorder (ASD), an intense but brief psychological reaction to a traumatic or life-altering event that doesn’t persist after 30 days ..read more
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What are the risk factors for PTSD?
Psychology Today » Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
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5M ago
Research shows that some people are at higher risk than others for PTSD. Most vulnerable are persons who have a history of multiple adverse experiences or mental difficulties. Having little social support or recurrent ongoing life stress are also risk factors. Physical impairment and job loss add to the risk ..read more
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