Trans and gender diverse offenders’ experiences of custody: A systematic review of empirical evidence
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by Sally M. Evans, Bethany A. Jones, Daragh T. McDermott
1M ago
Abstract Literature regarding trans and gender diverse (TGD) prisoners’ experiences of prison custody is limited. Reviewing international literature enables a better understanding of these experiences and how effectively TGD policies are implemented. This systematic review employed PRISMA and ENTREQ guidelines to enhance transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative and mixed-methods research. Seventeen papers were included and through meta-ethnographic synthesis three overarching themes emerged: structural, interpersonal and intrapersonal. Recommendations include reducing reliance on ..read more
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Sentencing individuals on cusp‐cases: The use of offenders’ backgrounds by Scottish Sheriffs
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by Javier Velásquez‐Valenzuela
1M ago
Abstract To what extent are accused's backgrounds within the criminal justice system considered during the sentencing process, and if they are, how do judges make sense of them? To better understand this aspect of the sentencing process, this article examines data from interviews with, and observations of, 16 Sheriffs in 14 different Scottish Sheriff Courts. The accused persons’ backgrounds were indeed considered during the sentencing process. However, how Sheriffs constructed their role as sentencers seemed to directly affect how they acknowledged and took them into account ..read more
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Issue Information
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
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1M ago
The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, Volume 63, Issue 2, Page 125-125, June 2024 ..read more
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A vision for academic and third sector collaboration in (criminal) justice
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by Harry Annison, Kate Paradine
2M ago
Abstract In this article we sketch a vision that might guide academic and third sector collaboration. We do so by drawing on a project that involved collaboration with a range of stakeholders, in order to stimulate ongoing discussion about how academics and the third sector might work together to seek positive change. Our findings show that there are keenly felt challenges, but also a sense of resilient optimism. A key finding among our stakeholders was a sense that there is an absence of an overarching shared vision, which was experienced by many of our respondents as consequential. Therefore ..read more
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Criminal record and employability in Ghana: A vignette experimental study
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by Thomas D. Akoensi, Justice Tankebe
2M ago
Abstract Using an experimental vignette design, the study investigates the effects of criminal records on the hiring decisions of a convenience sample of 221 human resource (HR) managers in Ghana. The HR managers were randomly assigned to read one of four vignettes depicting job seekers of different genders and criminal records: male with and without criminal record, female with and without criminal record. The evidence shows that a criminal record reduces employment opportunities for female offenders but not for their male counterparts. Additionally, HR managers are willing to offer interview ..read more
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Administrative law in action: Immigration administration By R. Thomas, London: Hart. 2022. pp. 336. £90.00 (hbk). ISBN: 9781509953110
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by Harry Annison
2M ago
The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, EarlyView ..read more
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The stains of imprisonment: Moral communication and men convicted of sex offenses By A. Ievins, Oakland, CA.: University of California Press. 2023. pp. 214. £30.00 (pbk); free (ebk). ISBN: 9780520383715
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by David J. Hayes
2M ago
The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, EarlyView ..read more
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Understanding prison living: Mitigating the problem of ‘incompatible’ incarcerated people through the perspectives of correctional officers
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by Rosemary Ricciardelli, Matthew S. Johnston, Gillian Foley, Marcus A. Sibley, Brittany Mario
2M ago
Abstract Prisoner incompatibility is a challenge for correctional officers (COs), as incompatible people in prison are more likely to engage in negative interactions, participate in altercations, cause harm to each other and create tension on a unit. Through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 28 COs employed in Atlantic Canada, we explore how incompatibility among incarcerated people shapes how incarcerated people are managed and perceived by COs. Engaging the prison design literature, we further examine the kinds of spatial designs and protocols that contribute to, or mitigate, incompat ..read more
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Bailed out: Defendants’ and stakeholders’ experiences of a bail support programme
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by Scott Peterson, Ian Lambie, Claire Cartwright
3M ago
Abstract Despite dropping crime rates and prison muster, pretrial population rates in New Zealand are growing faster than in other OECD nations, risking negative impacts on defendants and communities. Fourteen defendants and 18 stakeholders were interviewed about a bail support service's strengths and weaknesses. Officer-training quality, communication between stakeholders and access to practical and cultural resources were crucial to success. Defendants reported that professional staff support and having access to services were the most helpful aspects. Changes were positive overall, but the ..read more
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Poor neighbourhoods as targets for mass incarceration: Notes on the Brazilian war on drugs
Wiley » The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
by Pedro Bertolucci Keese
3M ago
Abstract This article analyses mass incarceration in Brazil and how the ongoing ‘war on drugs’ results in punitive dynamics involving the police and the judiciary, leading to the imprisonment of residents of poor neighbourhoods. I argue that the war on drugs intensifies the criminalisation of stigmatised and impoverished territories, extending beyond individual cases. In section 2, drawing on research from the United States and Brazil, I explore the key aspects of the spatial concentration of incarceration in both countries. In section 3, I focus on the specific dynamics of the war on drugs in ..read more
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