What is the Purpose of Hiccuping?
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5d ago
We’re all familiar with (hic) the mildly uncomfortable sensation (hic) that is hiccups (hic). Perhaps you swallowed a bit too much air at once, downed your lunch with incredible speed or took a swig of something overly carbonated or alcoholic. Maybe you laughed at a phenomenal joke for way too long — or maybe you simply became over-excited for no reason at all. The fact is, any one of these things (and a great many more) can set off a round of hiccups. And while most attacks occur sparingly and linger for only a few minutes, they can sometimes spiral out of control. Nearly 4,000 Americans are ..read more
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Alaskan Sea Otters Become Meal of Choice For Hungry Wolves
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5d ago
Sea otters are innovative, adorable and apex predators in their ecosystem — until now. On Pleasant Island, a 20 square mile uninhabited island off of Alaska, the deer population has likely dropped due to wolf predation. With the decrease in available prey, it appears that sea otters are now on the menu for wolves. According to a new study from Oregon State University and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, this may be the first time sea otters have become the predominant food source for a land-based predator like a wolf.  Researchers analyzed wolf scat and tracked the wolves with GPS ..read more
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Why Lakes Are Important Resources
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5d ago
The Great Salt Lake is yet another evaporating lake making headlines along with Lake Mead and Lake Powell due to low water levels. According to a report from Brigham Young University, unless measures are put in place to restore billions of gallons of water, the lake could be a bowl of toxic dust within the next five years.  Drying lakes can have disastrous effects on the planet and the people and animals who live there. Let’s take a look at why lakes are important and what happens when lakes dry up.  Read More: No End in Sight for Megadrought C ..read more
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How Winter Storms Become Blizzards
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5d ago
In March of 1888, areas in the Northeast received as much as 55 inches of snow over the span of a couple of days. On Feb. 5, 1978, both Boston and Providence were met with 27 inches of snow, hurricane-force winds and coastal flooding. In Dec. 2022, Buffalo received over 55 inches of snow as a blizzard impacted nearly 60 percent of Americans. For as long as they’ve been recorded, blizzards have impacted the United States. As they’ve continued to make an impact, scientists have learned more about how these dangerous winter storms form. What is a Blizzard? It may seem like any winter storm that d ..read more
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Dinosaur Hatchery With 92 Nests And Over 250 Eggs Uncovered In India
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6d ago
The discovery of 92 nesting sites with a total of 256 fossilized dinosaur eggs is an incredible feat in and of itself. But, the nests and eggs are helping researchers better understand one of the largest dinosaurs that once roamed across India.  According to a recent study from the University of Delhi, India, published in PLOS One, a team of paleontologists uncovered the nesting sites in the Lameta Formation — an area of the Narmada Valley in central India and a hotbed for dinosaur fossils, especially from the Late Cretaceous Period. The eggs and nests belonged to one of th ..read more
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This 2,300-Year-Old Mummy Has a Heart (and Tongue) of Gold
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6d ago
Ancient Egyptians went through a lot of linen when they wrapped up their lost loved ones. Winding long strips of the material around their torsos and their appendages — and sometimes around their individual fingers and toes — these wrappings were intended to protect and preserve the dead during their transition to the afterlife. But what was woven within and underneath these layers of linen? According to recent research in Frontiers in Medicine, the “digital unwrapping” of an approximately 2,300-year-old mummy solves this age-old secret. Research reveals that the mummy retained an abundance of ..read more
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The World's Only Floating National Park is Under Threat
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6d ago
Keibul Lamjao National Park is a natural wonder on many accounts. For starters, the park lies in the largest freshwater lake in northeast India, Loktak Lake, with a surrounding backdrop of low, gentle, green-tinged hills.   It's difficult to get more specific about the park’s location because its component parts don’t stick to one place — instead, they float. For that reason, Keibul Lamjao bills itself as the only floating national park in the world.   But the rich, biodiverse wetlands that comprise the park are in peril, impacting both the region's one-of-a-kind ecosy ..read more
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The Domino Effects of a Global Food Shortage
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6d ago
The World Food Programme (WFP) estimates that 349 million people in 79 countries are facing "acute food insecurity," an increase of 200 million people from before the pandemic. This sudden surge has caused the organization and others like it to warn that the world is hungrier than ever. There are several reasons for the dangerous food shortage, and world leaders caution that the lack of needed nutrition will lead to death and massive social upheaval.   Gauging the Global Food Crisis Public health experts determine whether an area is experiencing famine based on the daily de ..read more
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4 Dragons That Have Entered the Fossil Record
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6d ago
Old-school paleontologists would have frowned upon a colleague referring to a fossil find as anything like a dragon. Certainly in the early days of this branch of science, it must have been a tad exasperating to explain to non-scientists that the giant bone they found in the local quarry, or ground up for some folk remedy was not evidence of a legendary cryptid, but was instead a precious artifact worthy of preservation and legitimate study.   But if additions to the fossil record over the past couple of decades are anything to go by, paleontologists have loosened up a little. Many s ..read more
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Humans May Have Settled in North America 16,000 Years Ago, Ready to Hunt
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6d ago
In 1929 Ridgley Whiteman, then just a teenager, made an archeological discovery that would forever change our understanding of the first Indigenous people to land in North America. He found what would later be known as Clovis points, named after the town of Clovis, New Mexico, the site of their discovery. The fluted projectile points, dating back 13,000 years, show that ancestral Indigenous people not only lived in North America but also had the technology to hunt megafauna like woolly mammoths and large Pleistocene bison. Read More: Did Humans Hunt the Biggest Animals ..read more
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