Review: THE WESTERN IS A SPEECH ACT. RUN TIME APPROX 20 MIN
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
THE WESTERN IS A SPEECH ACT. RUN TIME APPROX 20 MIN / Tilghman Alexander Goldsborough / 1080 Press Mid-September, I attended an exposition of local and regional experiments in text and sound hosted by Opus 40, an upstate museum and sculpture park located in Saugerties, New York. Verbatim (the name of the event) entailed a day’s worth of performances held between an indoor reading room and an outdoor stage space backdropped and canopied by deciduous trees. Opus 40 is also the name of the on-site earthwork sculpture hand-sculpted by one Henry Fite (an artist with whom I was unfamiliar before vis ..read more
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Review: Pig
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
Pig / Sam Sax / Simon & Schuster, September 19, 2023 – $17 Sam Sax’s Pig follows the queer, Jewish writer and educator’s two prior successful poetry books, Madness (2017) and bury it (2018). Composed of poems published in The Adroit Journal, The Atlantic, Guernica, Poetry London, Tin House, and The Yale Review among other locations, Pig seems to be bent on success. While initial success is hardly a predictor of subsequent, extensive success for any creator, Sax proves in this collection that they are no two (book) hit wonder. Pig is as much of a poetic victory as Sax’s other two longer end ..read more
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Sunday Staff Picks: November 26th
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
Rouge / Mona Awad / Penguin Random House, September 12, 2023 – $34 (Hardcover) Mona Awad’s Rouge is obsessed with reflections— self-perceptions and the distortions that arise when we stare too long into ourselves. The novel centers around Mirabelle, a skin-care obsessed young woman dealing with the mysterious loss of her alluring mother, and seems to move in the same way that a hall of mirrors does: events and images spin around Mirabelle, never grounded in a concrete sequence, rather surreal and strangely saccharine. Like Awad’s Bunny, the prose at times seem a bit heavy-handed— references to ..read more
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Sunday Staff Picks: October 28th
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
A Living Remedy / Nicole Chung / Harper Collins, April 24, 2023 – $20 (Paperback) Nicole Chung’s Living Remedy is the first memoir I’ve read that made me cry. Part of this lies in the subject matter. The first section of Chung’s heartfelt memoir reckons with her status as a transracial adoptee, reared in the humble abode of a religious couple in rural Oregon. Growing up in an overwhelmingly white community that singled her out for her ethnicity, she grapples with questions of home, of belonging. She describes how her adoptive parents have difficulty relating to her because of this: “I could no ..read more
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Review: Conspiracist Manifesto
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
Conspiracist Manifesto / Anonymous (Translated by Robert Hurley) / Semiotext(e), June 13, 2023 – $17 (Paperback) Valentina Desidiri and Stefano Harney start their essay “A Conspiracy Without A Plot” with a hell of a provocation: “Today it is not possible to live except by way of a conspiracy. But equally, it is impossible to live today by way of a plot.” Their 2013 essay is intensely interested in those terms, plot and conspiracy. But those terms don’t conjure up images of shady government deals and men in sunglasses, not 4chan message boards nor thinly veiled antisemitism. Instead, their inte ..read more
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“Veraison” By Peter Kline
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
“Veraison” By Peter Kline I didn’t know what I was feeling. If I had changed it was like the change of cancer, disobedience flickering like a broken sign in that first cell while every other room in the vast metropolis lay dark; or like water articulating into ice, the gradually sudden something cleaving to itself, away from itself, requiring a different name with a keener sound; or like the prophet finally limping down from the mountain, edging along the zig-zag cliffs and rock-shatter, toward the starveling village there and the rich and populous heartland beyond; or like the pinpr ..read more
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“I Love You Snakeface” By Olivia Treynor
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
“I Love You Snakeface” By Olivia Treynor It was the start of summer: my mother driving, her fingers clutching the steering wheel with a grip that seemed impossibly serious to me in the June heat. Our drive was mostly wordless, save for my mother naming the birds stuck in the trees. (Bluejay, that one. You can tell by its head, see. The blue.) By the time we got to the camp, the sunlight had evaporated to an anemic pink that soon boiled to the plain navy of my school uniform skirts. My mother left the car running as I got out (Go on then, I’ll see you in August. And try to stay out of trouble ..read more
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Sunday Staff Picks: April 16th
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
perennial fashion presence falling / Fred Moten / Wave Books, May 2, 2023 -$20 Fred Moten’s perennial fashion presence falling revels in the full sensuous range of poetic language as aural and visual medium. Animated by homonymous play and an ever-shifting typography, Moten’s new book of poems concerns itself with the question of whether a transhistorical self subjected to dehumanizing racial violence can be reclaimed or reasserted through art. How does one craft a black aesthetic toward this aim? What if the poetic “I” as a form of lyrical self-assertion has always been a myth, obfuscating th ..read more
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Sunday Staff Picks: March 26th
The Columbia Review Magazine
by thecolumbiareview
6M ago
The Nursery / Szilvia Molnar / Penguin Random House, March 21, 2023 – $26 (Hardcover) Szilvia Molnar’s debut novel The Nursery is visceral and uncomfortable—  Molnar presents the reader with a portrait of new motherhood with all its agonies, its unscrupulous disasters. I chose the novel partly because the cover, blurred and simplistic, intrigued me. After reading a couple of pages, I realized the image was that of a lactating breast, a symbol usually associated with nurturing, the beauty of loving and caring for an infant. Yet Molnar’s novel is interested in those moments of motherhood so ..read more
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