The Erasure of the Uyghurs
China Books Review
by Nick Holdstock
5d ago
The last decade has been the darkest period in Uyghur history since the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949. Over 1 million Uyghurs and other Muslims have been interned in “reeducation” camps in the Xinjiang region of China since 2017. Mosques have been demolished, artists and intellectuals detained, and Arabic writing removed from many shops and signs. There have been forced sterilizations of Uyghur women, and forced marriages between Uyghurs and Han Chinese. The Chinese government views every aspect of Uyghur identity and culture as a threat to its vision of ethnic unity, and ..read more
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Book Talk: Ed Wong on the Edge of Empire
China Books Review
by Editors
1w ago
Buy the book The son of Chinese immigrants in Washington, D.C., Edward Wong grew up among family secrets. His father toiled in Chinese restaurants and rarely spoke of his native land, or his years in the People’s Liberation Army under Mao. Yook Kearn Wong came of age during the Japanese occupation in World War II and the Communist revolution, when he fell under the spell of Mao’s promise of a powerful China. His journey as a soldier took him from Manchuria during the Korean War to Xinjiang on the Central Asian frontier. In 1962, disillusioned with the Communist Party, he made plans ..read more
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Ep. 10: Rethinking U.S.-China Trade
China Books Review
by Mary Kay Magistad
2w ago
This is an episode of the China Books podcast, from China Books Review. Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, including Apple Podcasts and Spotify, where a new episode lands on the first Tuesday of each month. Or listen right here, including to our archive of past episodes. The U.S.-China trade relationship, over the past 30 years, benefited from China’s efficient supply chains and cheap labor, creating wealth for U.S. companies and investors, and upward mobility for Chinese factory workers. In 2023, U.S.-China trade was worth $575 billion. But there have been losers as well as wi ..read more
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The Martyrdom of Liu Xiaobo
China Books Review
by Orville Schell
3w ago
When Liu Xiaobo died in 2017, he had become China’s most fiercely principled and iconoclastic public voice. Possessing an almost allergic reaction to autocracy, he ardently opposed the Chinese Communist Party (CCP)’s rule and hoped passionately to see his country become a more open, humane and just place. His life and work are reminders that despite the well-manicured exterior of political life that the CCP tries to project, its despotic political system has generated deep wellsprings of opposition to its Leninist state. Although difficult to measure, sometimes even to see, these wellsprings ..read more
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Summer China Reads
China Books Review
by Alec Ash
3w ago
2024 has been a bumper crop for “China books” — that chimeric beast which we define as any English-language book whose topic or setting is China or the greater Sinophone world. Since we launched China Books Review last fall, we’ve been tallying them in our long-list of recent China books, and for the past nine months our count is already at 440. Of course, we can only cover a fraction of those in the 70+ articles we’ve published to date, from new reviews to archive picks. We hope you’ve enjoyed our fare, and are delighted that our work was recognized last week with an award for “Excellence in ..read more
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Peking Hotel: Perry Link on June 4 Intellectuals
China Books Review
by Liu He
1M ago
This post is a collaboration with the Substack podcast and newsletter Peking Hotel, hosted by Liu He (何流), which publishes bilingual oral histories of China experts around the world. Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, including Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or listen to selectively syndicated episodes here at China Books Review. Perry Link at his home in L.A. (Liu He) It’s a six-hour drive from Palo Alto to L.A. I normally stay overnight for any drive longer than three hours and try to enjoy the scenery. Then I learned that at the age of 79, Perry Link still drives between Palo Al ..read more
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The Habit of Hoping
China Books Review
by Jianying Zha
1M ago
Editor’s note: As summer approaches, as well as the 35th anniversary of the Tiananmen crackdown, we’re making a first foray into fiction. What follows is a truncated version of a longer story, written by author Jianying Zha in memory of the events of 1989 that she witnessed in Beijing. The protagonist, Shuya, is an idealistic college graduate who works in a stuffy Beijing television station and marries the conservative news editor Old Kang, who is then assigned as a Xinhua News Agency correspondent in Pyongyang, North Korea. That is where this adapted story begins, in April 1989 with news fro ..read more
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Books on the Chinese-American Experience
China Books Review
by Bryanna Entwistle
1M ago
Literature has long played a critical role in telling the story of diasporic communities, shedding light on experiences that are often marginalized. To celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month — a commemoration of diasporic contributions to America every May — in this partner post with Asia Society in New York, we asked five Chinese-American colleagues to each recommend a book that captures an aspect of the Chinese-American experience, or that resonates with them personally. From a 1948 novel about a Chinese laundromat on the Upper East Side, to a new biography of H ..read more
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China’s New Maritime Order
China Books Review
by Lyle J. Morris
2M ago
Last December, China and the Philippines found themselves embroiled in yet another standoff in the South China Sea. This time, the dispute was over a submerged reef, the Second Thomas Shoal, less than 200 nautical miles from the Philippines island of Palawan. Manila accused Beijing of repelling their attempt to resupply a handful of marines stationed on a rusted navy ship, the BRP Sierra Madre, which the Philippines had deliberately ran aground decades ago to bolster control of the reef. Video evidence, uploaded in real-time on social media, showed Chinese coast guard and maritime militia ves ..read more
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What China’s Reading: Short Stories
China Books Review
by Na Zhong
2M ago
In the 17th century, a ghost-obsessed Chinese scholar set up a roadside tea stand, where he would treat travelers and passersby to free drinks in exchange for strange tales they knew. Many of these stories, polished and reimagined by their compiler Pu Songling (蒲松龄), would go into Strange Tales from A Chinese Studio (聊斋志异), one of China’s most beloved works of literary fantasy and an early example (along with Tang Legends 唐代传奇) of its short story tradition. Sinophone short stories today are a hybrid of Western and classical Chinese traditions. Compared to Pu’s work, they are more fleshed out ..read more
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