Conan - Savage Sword of Conan #01 (Curtis)
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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1M ago
The final story here is a reprinting of "The Frost Giant's Daughter" from . You can read my review of Howard's story . This may be the most popular adaptation of the story in comic format. Barry Smith's pencils are just superb and perfectly illustrate the savageness of the fight on the icy tundra. The fight with Hymdul in the opening pages and the first up-close look at the Frost Giants on page 70 are real highlights of the entire issue. This is an iconic piece of Conan literature and the adaptation is awesome. I do have to say I love Cary Nord's art in the version as well. Both are fantastic ..read more
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Stark House Anthology Vol. 01
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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1M ago
put together four fantastic anthologies of magazine stories from , and to celebrate the publisher’s 25th Anniversary, they are releasing another short fiction anthology from a wider variety of 20th Century crime fiction sources. As such, it should come as no surprise that The anthology boasts 30 stories from crime fiction royalty including . They also included a never-published short novel called “So Curse the Day” by Jada M. Davis, author of the 1952 paperback ..read more
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Ki-Gor - And the Secret Legions of Simba
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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5M ago
The Winter 1939-1940 issue of story, “Ki-Gor and the Secret Legions of Simba”. If you aren't familiar with the character, you can read reviews of the first three Ki-Gor stories . The idea is that grew up in the jungles of Africa after his father, a Scottish missionary, was murdered by natives. , in his mid-20s, comes to the rescue of a downed female pilot named Helene and the two become lovers. In the third story, “Ki-Gor and the Giant Gorilla-Men”, the story ends with both the series hero, Helene, and their friend George, being rescued in Africa by a British expeditionary ship.  ..read more
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Ki-Gor - And the Giant Gorilla-Men
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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6M ago
We continue our examination of the published by Fiction House from 1938 to 1954. The reason is simple – the fantastic , who was featured in all 58 issues as the lead story. The house pseudonym was John Peter Drummond, but the real writers were a revolving door of staff and hired pens. The best way to read these stories is the excellent omnibus editions published by Altus Press, starting with Ki-Gor: The Complete Series Volume 1 ..read more
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A Gun for France
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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6M ago
Jackson's writing did require some short note-taking, but it was a very light chore. His prose is filled with a lot of description, with the escapism reading like a tourist guide to exotic locales - 80-foot cliffs nestling the calm Caribbean and its white sands and even keels. Readers enjoy these stories because it takes them away from the dull 9-5 grind. In that regard, “A Gun for France” easily does the getaway trick. Highly recommended.  ..read more
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Conan - The Devil in Iron
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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6M ago
If you can sense my tone, this wasn't one of my favorites stories authored by Howard. The abandoned island producing a city was really bizarre and felt rushed. I'm not sure if the “Dagon” featured here has any connection with H.P. Lovecraft lore, but this Dagon is the name of a city, not a deity. The giant's colossal nature, or threat, didn't seem to affect me much after reading Conan's battles with far more menacing beasts. This was a boss-fight that didn't quite pan out. I recommend a pass on "The Devil in Iron".  ..read more
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Doc Savage #93 - Tunnel Terror
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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7M ago
For sake of time, I'll fast-forward through the complex mini-mystery of how Savage is brought from New York to the mining town. Instead, we get Savage, Renny, Ham, and Monk arriving by plane with their two pointless pets, a pig and a runt-sized ape. Together, they begin interviewing Hennesey and the mining supervisors. The goal is to figure out what the fog is and how it scientifically works. But, the fog can't be duplicated or analyzed until someone can actually find it. The secret is in the mines, specifically an unexplored section that hints at a lost race of giant people that commanded tor ..read more
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Ki-Gor - And the Stolen Empire
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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7M ago
As if I needed more motivation in devouring these stories, “And the Stolen Empire” just launched me into the realms of superfan mania. I can’t wait to jump into the next installment, “Ki-Gor and the Giant Gorilla-Men ..read more
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Ki-Gor - King of the Jungle
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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7M ago
Obviously, there are a ton of imitators. Just like there are tons of and later collected in the omnibus Ki-Gor: The Complete Series Volume 1 "...there seems to be evil back of his beadlike eyes." imitators. The borrowed idea of a white man surviving the death of a parent in an exotic jungle doesn't steer me away. I enjoy a good jungle romp and these stories certainly seem to provide that. If you love that type of presentation, then this is a mandatory read ..read more
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Do You Know Me?
Paperback Warrior » Pulp
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8M ago
Elliott's provides some riveting stuff involving sexuality, social unrest, and mental illness. Circling back to the opening statements of this review, Elliott's could have never been published in today's market. However, this author's short-story certainly could have been published today, but seems unfitting and way ahead of its time for 1953. It’s a reversal. I question how “Do You Know Me?” could have possibly been published in that conservative era. It is art imitating life, as if Elliott himself is asking the question of his readers and publisher. Even when you look at the more violent pub ..read more
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