The Story of an Atlantic Slave War
Harvard University Press Blog » War & Military
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8M ago
In the cascading series of events initiated by the rebels in St. Mary’s, we see how African militancy derived from the entanglements of empire, trade, and war across the Atlantic. Tacky’s Revolt was smaller and less significant than Long and subsequent historians have supposed only because the slave war it advanced was larger and more consequential. “A more dangerous or troublesome Affair I was never engaged in, in all my life,” wrote Zachary Bayly about the St. Mary’s insurrection. And still the Coromantee War was closer to its beginning than its end. Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic ..read more
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The Problem with Privatization
Harvard University Press Blog » War & Military
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8M ago
In the face of Prince’s proposal, we turn back to Michaels and Prince took to the op-ed page of the , in which he argues that the State cannot be separated from its people, practices, and infrastructure without doing considerable violence to our constitutional order. From the book: earlier this summer Michaels warned of the particular dangers of privatizing the American military. In response to reports that Jared Kushner and the now-banished Steve Bannon had turned to contractors including Blackwater founder Erik Prince for help with Afghanistan , Michaels recounted the “fiscal, oper ..read more
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The American Tradition of Torture
Harvard University Press Blog » War & Military
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8M ago
A century later, the outlines of the “enhanced interrogation” methods adopted by the Central Intelligence Agency and military interrogators during the “War on Terror” became public. Americans learned that between 2003 and 2006 at least eighty-nine Middle Eastern detainees in CIA custody had been slapped, slammed against walls, deprived of sleep, stuffed into coffins, and threatened with violent death. The most severe method was “waterboarding,” a modern-day variant of the technique applied a century and a half earlier in American prisons. Waterboarding entailed pouring water over a cloth cover ..read more
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Q&A with Sarah Kovner, author of Prisoners of the Empire: Inside Japanese POW Camps
Harvard University Press Blog » War & Military
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8M ago
 because I wanted to capture all sides of this epic history.  Prisoners of the Empire: Inside Japanese POW Camps Officially, two agencies were given responsibilities for Allied POWs: the Prisoner of War Information Bureau would gather and transmit information to the International Committee of the Red Cross, such as lists of POWs, and the Prisoner of War Management Office would run logistics and issue guidance to camp commanders. The same bureaucrat was put in charge of both. He was not in the chain of command, and he had few staff to carry out these responsibilities. He could merely ..read more
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Remembering Our Veterans during a Pandemic
Harvard University Press Blog » War & Military
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8M ago
So instead, in honor of their memory, I share this  What Remains: Bringing America’s Missing Home from the Vietnam War , which chronicles the homecoming of Lance Corporal Merlin Raye Allen ..read more
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Q&A with Samuel Zipp, author of The Idealist: Wendell Willkie’s Wartime Quest to Build One World
Harvard University Press Blog » War & Military
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8M ago
But probably more important was the way that Willkie, like so many Americans, assumed that his country was a non-imperial nation. It was the country that had overthrown the British, got democracy up and running, and lifted the light of freedom for so many. Willkie opposed many of the manifestations of American empire, but tended to see them as exceptions or aberrations, not fundamental parts of the making of the United States. This led him to eagerly attack European colonialism, and the problem of American racial discrimination at home, but it tended to leave him less prepared to see American ..read more
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Marking the 75th Anniversary of Independence from British Rule
Harvard University Press Blog » War & Military
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8M ago
The volumes below illuminate the lives of individuals, the politics, and the literary traditions that shape the rich histories of both nations. They are in the spirit of Nehru’s midnight and Faiz’s dawn alike. The Loss of Hindustan: The Invention of India we had set out in sheer longing. His Majesty’s Opponent: Subhas Chandra Bose and India’s Struggle against Empire The Impossible Indian: Gandhi and the Temptation of Violence Bullhe Shah, translated by Christopher Shackle, Sufi Lyrics: Selections from a World Classic William Elison, Christian Lee Novetzke, and Andy Rotman, Amar Akbar Anthony ..read more
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