Mae Doyle from CLASH BY NIGHT (1952)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
2w ago
Image from classicfilmnoir.com Noir and melodrama often go hand in hand. Especially if Barbara Stanwyck has anything to do with it. And Clash by Night's Mae Doyle may just be one of the most perfect examples of that. One of the greatest performances in a career that, may I point out since we're in award season, went Oscar-less. Written by Alfred Hayes and based on the Clifford Odets play of the same name, Clash by Night (1952, dir. Fritz Lang) tells the story of Mae Doyle (Barbara Stanwyck), a cynical and bitter woman who returns to her hometown, Monterey, Calif., after a decade in New York ..read more
Visit website
Dix Steele from IN A LONELY PLACE (1950)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
1M ago
Image from BAMF Style Of all the characters in all the films noir in all of Hollywood, Dix Steele is the most relatable to me. I, too, am a grumpy, temperamental screenwriter who's a little bit in love with Gloria Grahame. I just don't live in a lavish apartment in Hollywood. Action! Los Angeles, California. Dix Steele (Humphrey Bogart) has to read a book that he's going to adapt for the screen. He doesn't want to, so he gets hat-check girl Mildred Atkinson (Martha Stewart) to come home with him so she can tell him the story, since she's so clearly engrossed by it. The next day, she is found ..read more
Visit website
Waldo Lydecker from LAURA (1944)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
1M ago
Image from www.eoeconomist.com If the streets of noir world had names, Arrogant Alley would surely be one of them. And Waldo Lydecker would be its most prominent resident. Clifton Webb's return to the screen at the age of fifty-four gave him his most enduring film role and us the most acerbic wit ever in film noir. Based on the Vera Caspary novel of the same name, Laura (1944, dir. Otto Preminger) is a classic whodunnit. Who killed advertising executive and socialite Laura Hunt (Gene Tierney) and why? That's what Detective Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews) wants to know. We have Waldo Lydecker ..read more
Visit website
Moe Williams from PICKUP ON SOUTH STREET (1953)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
2M ago
Image from criminalelement.com If you thought comedy and horror get overlooked at the Oscars, you should have a word with film noir. Noir was consistently ignored by the Academy back in the day, which is why this is the *first* Oscar-nominated performance ever featured on The Losers of Film Noir. Everyone's ultimate character actress Thelma Ritter was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for her role as police informant in Pickup on South Street (1953) and what a deserved nomination that was. Written and directed by Samuel Fuller, the titular pickup in Pickup on South Street happens on a Ne ..read more
Visit website
Steve Thompson from CRISS CROSS (1949)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
3M ago
Image from classicfilmnoir.com Before he started rolling around on the beach with Deborah Kerr, ordering Tony Curtis around, or diving in everyone's swimming pools, Burt Lancaster played naive fools in 1940s noirs. Robert Siodmak, in particular, clearly thought he had a knack for it, as he played a similar character in not one but two of his films. One is The Killers (1946). The other is Criss Cross (1949) - see if you can spot Curtis’ early cameo. Based on Don Tracy's novel of the same name, Criss Cross stars Burt Lancaster as an armored truck driver caught up on a bad case of double crossi ..read more
Visit website
Coral Chandler from DEAD RECKONING (1947)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
4M ago
Image from offscreen.com There are seven deadly sins and seven wonders of the world. Lizabeth Scott's face is a strong contender for number eight on both counts. Impossibly, almost offensively beautiful and with a voice to match, only slightly higher though raspier than Lauren Bacall's, every second she was not on screen, was a wasted second. And film noir was her playground. Logically. In Desert Fury (1947), Pitfall (1948), Too Late For Tears (1949), among others, she proved that she was one of its key players. And in Dead Reckoning (1947), she showed us why. Written by Steve Fisher and Oli ..read more
Visit website
Cal Bruner from PRIVATE HELL 36 (1954)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
5M ago
Image from Mondo Digital Kathie Moffat. Phyllis Dietrichson. Kitty Collins. Cora Smith. You know what they all have in common. You can picture all of them in your head without me even naming their films. You've seen all of their names on countless lists of great noir femmes fatale. They're a film noir staple. Femme fatale is as common an expression as 'film noir' itself. But what about their male counterparts? A while back, I wrote on The Old Hollywood Garden that the homme fatale is and should be a thing, and I listed five of them. Cal Bruner was on that list. In Private Hell 36 (1954), wri ..read more
Visit website
Michael O'Hara from THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI (1947)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
5M ago
Image from Offscreen.com blog I turned 31 yesterday. Which means I am six years older than Orson Welles was when he made the greatest movie ever made. He is one of my most admired people, probably my favorite raconteur and definitely one of my favorite misunderstood rebels. He is also the person I'm most jealous of. And my lifelong love-hate relationship with Orson Welles has not removed him from the many pedestals I've put him on. Say what you want about him, and God knows everybody has, but you have to, if nothing else, admire his tenacity. Hollywood didn't know what to do with its most pr ..read more
Visit website
Margot Shelby from DECOY (1946)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
5M ago
Image from IMDb A few months ago, I wrote a piece about superlatives in film noir on Medium. The most brutal? The Phenix City Story (1955). The most confusing? The Big Sleep (1946). And the weirdest? Well... welcome to Decoy (1946). Jack Bernhard's directorial debut is a bizarre, ludicrous, insanely bonkers, utterly enjoyable little noir. Why? Let's just say someone literally comes back to life. No, seriously. Decoy is spearheaded by Jean Gillie, a little-known British actress who came to America to do the film, then after divorcing Bernhard, went back to the UK, only to die at 33 ..read more
Visit website
Mark Dixon from WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS (1950)
The Losers of Film Noir
by Carol Saint Martin
5M ago
Image from Pinterest Some noirs represent the genre to a T. Out of the Past is famously described as the prototypical noir. The Maltese Falcon has all the elements that, when put in the right order, make up the kind of noir that people expect to see when they sit down to watch one. And The Big Sleep has all those lines and is endlessly confusing. And some other noirs represent what’s underneath it all. Brutality. Violence. Cruelty. Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950) belongs in the latter category. ‘Innocent people get into terrible jams too.’ Mark Dixon Featuring one of the best openings of an ..read more
Visit website

Follow The Losers of Film Noir on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR