Limiting ultra-processed foods does not necessarily make for a healthy diet, suggests study
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Dr. Kamal Kant Kohli
2d ago
Chicago: A new study demonstrates that eating primarily minimally processed foods, as they are defined by the NOVA classification system, does not automatically make for a healthy diet, suggesting that the types of foods we eat may matter more than the level of processing used to make them. Comparing two menus reflecting a typical Western diet — one emphasizing minimally processed foods and the other emphasizing ultra-processed foods, as categorized by the NOVA classification system — the researchers found that the less processed menu was more than twice as expensive and reached its expirati ..read more
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Study Links Western Diets to Higher Risk of IBD and Colorectal Cancer
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Anshika Mishra
2d ago
A recent review published in Nature Reviews Microbiology has revealed that Western diets significantly increase the risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer. Conducted by APC Microbiome Ireland (APC) in collaboration with Teagasc and University College Cork (UCC), the study explores the impact of various dietary patterns on gut health and associated diseases. The comprehensive review analysed six prevalent diets: Mediterranean, high-fiber, plant-based, high-protein, ketogenic, and Western. The focus was on how these diets influence the gut microbiome—the community of mi ..read more
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Caffeine May Intensify Brain Changes Caused by Sleep Loss: Study
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Anshika Mishra
2d ago
A recent study published in Scientific Reports has found that caffeine might exacerbate the negative effects of chronic sleep restriction on brain structure, specifically gray matter. Conducted at the German Aerospace Center’s research facility, the study sheds light on how caffeine intake during periods of sleep deprivation can lead to greater reductions in gray matter volume compared to those who abstain from caffeine. Gray matter, crucial for processing information and regulating cognitive functions, has been linked to various mental health issues when its volume decreases. This new resea ..read more
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Healthy prenatal dietary patterns tied to lower risk of autism diagnosis in offspring: JAMA
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Medha Baranwal
4d ago
Norway: In a cohort study of mother-child dyads, following a healthy prenatal diet pattern was linked to a reduced likelihood of autism diagnosis and social communication challenges, though it did not show a significant association with restrictive and repetitive behaviors. The findings, published in JAMA Network Open, illuminate the link between prenatal dietary patterns and autism-related outcomes in offspring, contributing to advancing our understanding of autism's origins. In the study comprising 84 548 mother-infant dyads in Norwegian Mother, Father, and Child Cohort (MoBa) and 11 670 m ..read more
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Promoting Dietary Fiber Intake during preconception Key Strategy to Prevent Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy: study
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Medha Baranwal
1w ago
Japan: Recent findings from the Japan Environment and Children’s Study have revealed a benefit of preconception dietary fiber intake for preventing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) onset. Based on the findings, the researchers suggest considering new recommendations to encourage higher dietary fiber intake as part of preconception care.� The findings were published online in Pregnancy Hypertension.� Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy contribute significantly to health complications and mortality. Fiber-rich foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes, are known ..read more
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Study Reveals J-Shaped Link Between Sodium Intake and Atrial Fibrillation Risk: Targeting High Sodium Diets for Prevention
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Medha Baranwal
1w ago
Canada: Patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) who consume a sodium-rich diet may have an increased likelihood of developing atrial fibrillation (AF), according to an analysis that combines data from two large randomized clinical trials. The findings were published online in JAMA Network Open. In this cohort study of sodium intake and AF risk, the researchers found a J-shaped association between sodium intake and AF risk in patients with CVD or diabetes. Sodium intakes exceeding 6 grams per day were linked to a 10% increase in risk for every additional gram of sodium consumed ..read more
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High coffee consumption may significantly increase prostate cancer risk among smokers, suggests study
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Dr. Shravani Dali
1w ago
High coffee consumption may significantly increase prostate cancer risk among smokers, suggests study published in the Current Developments in Nutrition. A study was done to evaluate the association between coffee consumption and prostate cancer risk. They evaluated 27,111 male Finnish smokers, ages 50-69 years, from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study cohort with self-reported coffee consumption data. Multivariable proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for prostate cancer risk based on ..read more
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Low-GI Mediterranean Diet Enhances Quality of Life for Diabetes-Prone Adults: Study
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Anshika Mishra
1w ago
In a recent study published in The Journal of Nutrition, researchers explored the effects of low- and high-glycemic-index (GI) Mediterranean-style (MED) healthy eating patterns (HEPs) on sleep and health-related quality of life. Health-related quality of life strongly predicts morbidity and mortality, making it a crucial measure for evaluating the effects of interventions. Evidence indicates that low HRQoL is associated with higher cardiometabolic risks. The 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36) is commonly used to assess HRQoL. Additionally, sleep is an important lifestyle factor linked ..read more
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New Study Reveals Optimal Magnesium Levels Could Lower Dementia Risk
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Anshika Mishra
1w ago
In a recent study published in the journal� Advances in Nutrition, scientists examined whether different measures of magnesium levels, including biomarkers, dietary intake, and supplements, were associated with cognitive health and neurological functioning in adults. Dementia in older adults significantly contributes to disability, health burdens, and mortality, affecting memory, behavior, and daily activities. With over 55 million people worldwide diagnosed, the prevalence and healthcare costs are expected to rise due to the aging population. Targeting modifiable risk factors like stress, d ..read more
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EAT-Lancet Diet Linked to Reduced Risks of Depression and Anxiety claims study
Medical Dialogues » Diet & Nutrition
by Medha Baranwal
1w ago
China: Greater adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet—predominantly plant-based and focused on consuming vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and nuts—was associated with reduced risks of developing depression, anxiety, and their co-occurrence, says the latest study in Nature Communications. The findings emphasize that encouraging this attainable and sustainable dietary pattern could have significant benefits for preventing depression and anxiety. High-quality diets are increasingly recognized as a promising strategy to combat the rising prevalence of mental health disorders. The EAT-Lancet diet, est ..read more
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