Vineyard Visit: Dr. Burklin Wolf
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
9M ago
It was early June in the Pfalz, and I was on the train to Bad Dürkheim. In just a few months, rowdy Germans would fill these trains going to and from the Wurstmarkt, Germany’s largest wine and sausage festival. But for now, the train was quiet, whizzing by fields full of verdant vines. We met up with Dr. Bürklin Wolf’s export manager Oskar Micheletti, who happily received us and showed us around the estate. We were in the southern part of Wachenheim. Wachenheimer Altenburg, one of their premier cru sites. “Here we have many different soil types in quite a small area. This enables us to produ ..read more
Visit website
Bois de Boursan
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
Rows of gnarled vines bathing in sunshine, a gentle breeze, and the quiet hum of the cicadas. Distracted by the demands of everyday life, sometimes we’re whisked to the present by something remarkable. How do we remember these wonderful places? For Jean-Paul Versino, he captures the countryside charm of his vineyards in every bottle. Walking with Jean-Paul through his vineyards reminds me that winemakers are farmers first. An unassuming estate of ten hectares in one of France’s most prestigious appellations, Domaine Bois de Boursan stands out from its’ aristocratic neighbors. The papal keys e ..read more
Visit website
Into Austria! Leo Hillinger’s 2018 Pinot Noir ‘Eveline’
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
As the days shorten and the thermometer drops here in New York, everyone seems to slump into that sleepy autumn mood. For me, this means wool sweaters, books, and of course, red wine. So, when my acquaintance Jessica from the Leo Hillinger winery offered me to taste their pinot noir, I was thrilled. This is my first review outside of my German wine niche, so it was a great experience to delve into research on Austria’s winemaking and terroir. When Americans think of Austrian wine, what often comes to mind is the country’s hallmark grüner veltliner, a zesty white wine perfect for summer. But w ..read more
Visit website
Carl Ehrhard Spatburgunder 2019 Rheingau
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
The other evening, I had the pleasure of doing a blind tasting with my friend Kendal. Sniffing the glass, my first guess was a nebbiolo-the wine had wonderful aromas of roses and a high acidity, but I didn’t get bold tannins typical of a nebbiolo. Then I was leaning towards a Burgundian pinot noir… only to reveal it was a Spätburgunder! (Pinot noir). Having enjoyed this beautiful wine, I needed to write up this blog to learn more about the wine and its’ producer. The Carl Ehrhard vineyards are located in the Rheingau, at the prestigious site of Rüdesheim. One of the many aspects that give dep ..read more
Visit website
Rivers and Castles: The Riesling of Schloß Stahlek
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
During my trip to Germany in June, I made an unforgettable stop in the quaint town of Bacharach. The town is located along the Rhine River in the Mittel-Rhein appellation. Secured by a 13th century wall and nestled between vineyard slopes, the town has remained remarkably intact. Since time immemorial, rivers have laid the foundation for civilizations, and what is a civilization without wine? Here in Bacharach, the sun-soaked slopes and slate soils produce amazing Riesling. In Germany, steep slopes provide some unique advantages for viticulture. The loose slate soil supports proper drainage ..read more
Visit website
Styles of Riesling: Alsace and Baden
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
The joy of winetasting stems from solving the puzzle in each glass. On a recent trip to Germany and France, I investigated the neighboring regions of Alsace and Baden to figure out what makes them unique. To highlight their differences, I compared their styles of my favorite grape: riesling. Above all, terroir is the name of the game with riesling. It is prized for its ability to express itself in different ways according to where it’s grown. In this blog, I’ll explain how the two climates result in distinct styles of wine. Alsatian Climate Alsace, protected by the Vosges mountains in the wes ..read more
Visit website
Fritz Haag 2020 Estate Riesling
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
Photo credit to Layth Gadoui Not many winemakers can claim their vineyards were appraised as Grand Cru by Napoleon, but the Haag family’s story is certainly one to marvel at. Although their label harkens to their historic beginnings, this winemakers’ future is just as riveting as its past. Founded in 1605, their winery is located in the central Mosel River valley, in the town of Brauneberg. Here in the central Mosel, breathtakingly steep vineyards have brought this region’s wine quality to unparalleled heights. Not to my surprise, viticulturists didn’t just plant on these dizzying slopes for ..read more
Visit website
Wine Cooperative: Baden-Baden
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
Renowned for its’ 19th century splendor and healing thermal springs, Baden-Baden is a monument to the finer things in life. The wine region, also called Baden, is the sunniest in Germany. With a steady flow of wine and sunshine, one can’t help but wax poetic about this place. A few kilometers from the grandeur of the town, the landscape quickly transforms. The dense black forest gives way to towering hills, neatly dotted with rows of vines. I set my sights on learning more about the Baden-Baden wine cooperative. In this blog, I’ll explain how their wine cooperative works, what’s produced her ..read more
Visit website
Staying Cozy This Winter: Glühwein
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
Stroll around a Christmas market in Germany and you’d be hard pressed not to try it. The sweet aromas of cinnamon, oranges, and cloves waft through the frosty air. Take a sip, and a warm sensation flows over you. Part holiday spirit, part alcohol. Glühwein, otherwise known as mulled wine, is a classic winter drink of hot and spiced red wine. Topping it off, it’s served with a decorative and delicious orange slice. Source: Pexels Glühwein has a long history. True to the drink’s festive and indulgent nature, production started in Roman times, around 20 A.D. Later on, during the Middle Ages, Gl ..read more
Visit website
Schloss Mühlenhof 2020 “Boden Funk”Müller-Thurgau
Brauner Meyer Wine Blog
by Dylan Beirne-Meyer
1y ago
Tonight, I’m at my apartment in Brooklyn, sitting down for a wine tasting with my buddy Stevie. We’re trying out Boden Funk’s 2020 Müller-Thurgau, from the Schloss Mühlenhof winery in Rheinhessen (try saying that that three times fast). Müller-Thurgau is a white wine which came about in 1882 as the offspring of Riesling and Madeleine Royal. As of 2019, it is the second most planted grape in Germany (German Wine Institute). Much of the production is blended into less-than exciting bottles. When I asked my German friend Nicolai about the grape, he recalled chugging a cheap wine with his high sc ..read more
Visit website

Follow Brauner Meyer Wine Blog on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR