61. Thrush in Horses
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
3M ago
Thrush describes an infection that develops in the frog of one or more of the horse’s hooves, caused by a fungal or bacterial pathogen.  Hooves with frogs that have deep sulci are prone to becoming infected with pathogens that cause thrush. Wet and dirty environments contribute to the development of this infection as thrush-causing pathogens flourish under these conditions. Typical signs of a thrush infection include hoof tenderness and a foul-smelling discharge from the hoof. Prompt treatment is necessary to stop the spread of the infection. Management strategies to preven ..read more
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58. Swayback (Equine Lordosis): Causes, Management & Care
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
3M ago
Swayback, or equine lordosis, is characterized by a large dip in the spine of a horse, often resulting in a high wither and severe downwards curve to their topline. Swayback is more common in older horses and broodmares who have carried multiple large babies. Lordosis can also occur in younger horses with a genetic predisposition.  Equine lordosis is caused by a failure of the ligament support structures along the length of the back. When the ligaments are weak, stretched, or compromised, the spine can sag toward the ground. Although shocking in appearance, equine ..read more
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57. Hay Belly in Horses
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
3M ago
A large, round belly doesn’t always mean your horse is overweight. Some horses have a hay belly that makes them appear pregnant, yet they may struggle to maintain enough body condition to cover their ribs. While multiple factors contribute to abdominal distention in horses, poor hindgut fermentation of high-fibre, low-quality forage is the primary culprit. These horses may not be getting enough energy and protein from their diet, leading to poor topline and body condition. Dietary changes or gut support are necessary to get rid of the hay belly. This podcast will review the ..read more
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55. Corrective Shoeing for Horses
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
3M ago
Your farrier and veterinarian will definitely agree that issues with your horse’s hooves can compromise the entire function of your horse. Hoof problems not only cause your horse pain and affect the weight-bearing ability of the foot but also lead to compensatory movements, which can cause issues and injuries in other parts of the body. Corrective shoeing is a common way to address or reduce the effects of many hoof issues. From navicular syndrome to laminitis to tendon and ligament injuries, appropriate corrective shoeing done by a qualified farrier can ..read more
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54. Research-Backed Benefits of Chasteberry
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
3M ago
Chasteberry is an herbal supplement that is used to support mood balance and hormone health in female and male horses. The Chastetree berry (Vitex agnus-castus) plant is a shrub that grows in the Mediterranean and parts of Asia. The fruits and leaves contain active ingredients that influence hormonal balance in horses. This herb is purported to support hypothalamus and pituitary function in horses with Cushing’s disease/PPID. Anecdotally, chasteberry is said to help make moody mares easier to handle and may have a calming effect on aggressive stallions or gel ..read more
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53. Feeding Canola Oil to Horses
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
4M ago
Canola oil is a calorie-dense fat commonly used in the equine diet to promote weight gain and help maintain body condition.  This oil provides cool energy for performance horses and can replace grain-based feeds in your horse’s ration to support metabolic health.  Feeding fat also improves coat quality and can support gut health. Compared to other oils, canola oil is relatively affordable and widely available. However, some horse owners might not want to feed this oil due to its fatty acid profile. Canola oil is primarily comprised of monounsaturated and ..read more
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52. Botflies in Horses
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
4M ago
Botflies (Gasterophilus spp) are parasitic flies that affect the horse’s digestive tract and can cause negative health consequences. Botflies lay eggs on the horse’s coat in the summer. Some of these eggs, known as horse bots, are ingested as the horse licks and grooms itself. The bot eggs hatch and the larvae develop in the horse’s mouth before migrating to the stomach where they attach to the gastric mucosa. Once mature, they detach and are passed through the manure. They pupate into flies, and the cycle repeats with new botflies seeking out horses to host their ..read more
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51. Top 8 Joint Supplements for Horses
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
4M ago
Supplements targeting joint health are some of the most sought-after dietary supplements for horses, especially due to the high prevalence of joint injuries and deterioration later in life. But which equine joint supplements actually work and which are all hype? Many of the ingredients often touted for improving joint health have limited research in horses. And some of the most popular supplements believed to work have been demonstrated ineffective when actually studied in equine populations. (You may be surprised by which ingredients DON’T work.) That b ..read more
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50. Best Bedding for Horses
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
5M ago
The type and amount of bedding you use for horses affects more than just how long it takes you to clean his stall. Bedding adds cushion to the floor of your horse’s living space, absorbs moisture, and helps control odours that could harm your horse’s respiratory health. Bedding depth also influences resting behaviours. Good bedding materials provide enough cushion for horses to lie down and are easy for care staff to keep clean. Different materials have unique advantages and disadvantages. Selecting the best bedding for your horse will depend on budget, housing situati ..read more
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37. Common Dental Issues in Horses
Mad Barn Academy
by Mad Barn
5M ago
Horses can experience a number of different dental issues over their lifetime, impacting their ability to chew and digest their feed. Unaddressed dental issues can affect your horse’s health, condition, behaviour and performance. This is why it’s important to have your horse’s teeth checked by an experienced veterinarian or equine dentist on a regular basis. Dental problems are the third most common medical problem seen in large animal practices in the U.S. Unfortunately, postmortem studies show high levels of clinically significant, undiagnosed dental disord ..read more
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