Lonely Mouth? Discover the Concept of Kuchisabishii
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Satoko Nakabayashi
12h ago
Have you ever found yourself reaching for a snack, not because you were hungry, but simply because you felt like munching on something? If so, you’ve experienced what the Japanese call “くちさびしい” (kuchisabishii), which literally translates to “lonely mouth.” As much as this phrase sounds weird and a bit crazy, the feeling is universal and can be understood by people around the world.   What is Kuchisabishii? Kuchisabishii is a term that captures the desire to eat when your mouth feels “lonely” or idle. It’s that feeling when you crave a snack while watching TV, reading a book, or even just ..read more
Visit website
Japanese Glass Floats: From Essential Tool to Trendy Décor
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Satoko Nakabayashi
1w ago
Ever spotted a shiny, weathered glass ball in a home decor or antique store and wondered what it was? Meet the Japanese glass float, a little piece of maritime history that's making waves in home décor around the world. A Brief Dive into History Japanese glass floats, known as "ukidama" (浮玉), were originally used by Japanese fishermen to keep their fishing nets afloat. Crafted by skilled artisans, these floats were made from recycled glass—often from old sake bottles! They were designed to be tough, surviving the rough and tumble of the open sea. From Fishing Tool to Coastal Cool As fishin ..read more
Visit website
Chilling Out During the Hottest Season with Kakigoori
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Koko Nakabayashi
2w ago
As part of the 二十四節気 (24 Solar Terms), 小暑 (Shousho) marks the beginning of the hottest period of the year. This time in Japan is synonymous with the rainy season, known as 梅雨 (tsuyu), and the frequent typhoons that sweep through the region. While these elements bring intense heat and humidity, they also deliver much-needed water to nourish Japan’s lush landscapes. One delightful way to embrace the season is by indulging in traditional treats like かき氷 (kakigoori), a refreshing shaved ice dessert that comes in a variety of flavors and toppings. Kakigoori is more than just a summer snack—it’s a ..read more
Visit website
Ma – The Japanese Art of Space and Time
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Koko Nakabayashi
3w ago
Have you ever noticed how the pauses between actions can bring a sense of rhythm and harmony? This is the essence of 間 (Ma), a profound Japanese concept of space and time that emphasizes the beauty found in silence and gaps. What is Ma? 間 (Ma) is a Japanese word that broadly represents “gap,” “space,” or “pause.” It refers to the space between two structural parts. In traditional Japanese culture, Ma is a crucial element, creating harmony and balance through intentional spaces. In Japanese architecture, unlike Western styles where doors to each room line a hallway, Japanese buildings connect r ..read more
Visit website
Mottainai — The Spirit of Not Wasting
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Koko Nakabayashi
3w ago
Growing up in Japan, I constantly heard the phrase “ah, mottainai” from my grandparents, parents, and everyone around me. It’s a common expression that serves as a gentle reminder to avoid waste and to cherish what we have. So, what exactly is Mottainai? It’s a concept rooted in Buddhist philosophy that emphasizes the importance of not wasting resources and appreciating what we have. Think of it as a call to mindfulness and sustainability, encouraging us to use only what we need and to value every resource. Incorporating Mottainai into our daily routines doesn’t have to be complicated. Here ar ..read more
Visit website
Blooming in Your Own Time with Ou Bai Tou Ri
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Koko Nakabayashi
3w ago
Let’s dive into the beautiful concept of 桜梅桃李 (Ou Bai Tou Ri) today. This Japanese saying teaches us to appreciate the unique beauty of each season. Just like the different blossoms—cherry, plum, peach, and Japanese plum—we all have our own unique beauty.   Appreciating the Unique Beauty of Each Season 桜 (Sakura): Cherry blossoms are a beautiful reminder of the fleeting nature of life. Their brief bloom encourages us to cherish each moment. 梅 (Ume): Plum blossoms are resilient, often blooming even before the last frost melts away. They symbolize quiet strength and the beauty of perseveran ..read more
Visit website
Tokyo’s Winter Whisper
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Koko Nakabayashi
5M ago
As we recently talked about the warmth of ‘Three Cold, Four Warm (Sankan Shion 三寒四温), Tokyo has given us a gentle nudge back into the arms of winter. The snow has returned, coating our streets and landmarks in a quiet blanket of white. The Sensoji Temple, a symbol of enduring history, stands majestic amidst the snowfall, its red gates even more striking against the frosty backdrop. This beautiful snowfall is a perfect example of the ‘Sankan Shion’ weather pattern at work. After a few warmer days that hinted at spring’s approach, the ‘three cold’ days have swept in, draping the city in snow and ..read more
Visit website
Welcoming Spring’s Simple Beauty
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Koko Nakabayashi
5M ago
As we enter February 2024, a special date marks the calendar in the Japanese twenty-four seasonal division calendar: Risshun (立春), the first day of spring. This year, it falls on February 4th, a day that holds deep cultural significance and heralds a time of renewal and awakening in nature. In Japan, the arrival of Risshun is beautifully symbolized by the blooming of the Wintersweet (ロウバイ). This flower, known for its resilience and elegance, braves the last chills of winter, offering a striking contrast with its blooms against the snow. More than just a visual spectacle, th ..read more
Visit website
Winter Warmth of Sado and Matcha
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Koko Nakabayashi
5M ago
Are you a fan of matcha? ? I sure am! From the traditional matcha tea to modern twists like lattes, cookies, cakes, and even ice cream, there's a matcha-flavored delight for every mood. This vibrant green tea has recently become a global sensation, but its true essence lies in its deep roots in the Japanese Tea Ceremony, or 'sado 茶道'.   The Art of Sado: More Than Just Tea Sado, the Way of Tea, is an ancient Japanese practice that transcends simply brewing tea. Inspired by Zen Buddhism, it's a ritual that values beauty, precision, and living in the moment. Preparing matcha during sado is a ..read more
Visit website
Three Cold, Four Warm – Japan’s Spring Dance
The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog
by Koko Nakabayashi
6M ago
Ever heard of 三寒四温 (Sankan Shion)? It’s Japan’s unique spring rhythm, where cold days meet warm beginnings. This concept is not just a weather pattern; it’s a poetic symbol of life's ebb and flow. In Japan, the transition from winter to spring is often unpredictable. The phrase 三寒四温, meaning ‘three cold, four warm,’ beautifully captures this. After enduring three colder days, we are rewarded with four warmer days. This cycle repeats, gently nudging the environment from the frosty grip of winter into the gentle warmth of spring.   The Cultural Significance of Sankan Shion Sankan Shion is m ..read more
Visit website

Follow The Wabi Sabi Shop Blog on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR