Managing a Pet With Ringworm
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
What is dermatophytosis, and how did my pet get it? Dermatophytosis is a fungal infection of the skin, also known as ringworm. It is highly contagious to other animals as well as people. Pets often become infected through direct contact with an infected animal or exposure to a contaminated environment. Download PDF How can I protect my family and other pets? Thoroughly cleaning the environment to remove infected hairs and dander is extremely important. Infected hairs can stay infectious for up to 18 months. During this time, they can be a source of exposure for family members and other pe ..read more
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Lifelong Learning Keeps Us Young
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
At age 87, Michelangelo famously stated, “I am still learning.” I love this quote, as I and many of my colleagues are lifelong learners. Learning keeps us young. I believe we should never stop learning because life never stops teaching. The science of medicine and the practice of nursing are always evolving, and each year finds our profession implementing innovative medical advances and nursing strategies to help strengthen the lives of our patients. In this issue of Today’s Veterinary Nurse, we see this evolution in our Trends in Veterinary Nursing article exploring alternative protein source ..read more
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Understanding Alternative Protein Sources for Companion Animal Food
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
Pet owners are more engaged than ever in managing their pet’s health. They want to decide what is best for their pet, including feeding what they determine to be the best nutrition. How do they make this determination? Through information obtained from their peers, pet store employees, marketing advertisements, search engine results, and their veterinary team. Pet owners’ values, ethics, and world views can also motivate their decision. This factor is leading many around the world to look for alternative protein sources, including ingredient sources for canine and feline diets. While we know t ..read more
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Limiting the Zoonotic Risks of Fungal Skin Infections
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
Abstract Although a few zoonotic fungal skin infections exist, the one that most commonly affects cats and dogs is dermatophytosis, often called ringworm. Dermatophytes can live in the environment for many months, making this disease difficult to cure and requiring much effort to disinfect the environment. Client education is imperative to prevent the spread of zoonotic fungal diseases to humans and other pets in the household, and the veterinary nurse plays an important role in all aspects of managing these diseases. Take-Home Points The most common zoonotic fungal diseases are dermatophytos ..read more
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Nutritional Management of Gastrointestinal Disease in Brachycephalic Dogs
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
Abstract As the popularity of brachycephalic breeds continues to increase, so does the diagnosis of brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome. Historically, the concern has been focused on surgical correction to alleviate respiratory conditions. Respiratory conditions continue to affect brachycephalic dogs today, along with increased signs involving the gastrointestinal tract. Digestive signs in brachycephalic dogs are usually medically managed with dietary modifications and pharmaceutical agents. In cases of hiatal hernia that remain unresponsive to medical management, surgical management is ..read more
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Canine Chronic Pain Assessment
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
Abstract Any dog may experience chronic pain. While owners can play a key role in recognizing signs of chronic pain in dogs, identification and assessment of chronic pain are vital skills for the veterinary nurse. This article discusses the indications for and steps involved in performing a canine chronic pain assessment. Take-Home Points Chronic pain can occur in animals at any age. Veterinary nurses should be able to teach anyone in the practice, as well as the client, how to successfully use a clinical metrology instrument. Dogs should be evaluated for pain, even if only by observation, at ..read more
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Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Causes, Recognition, and Treatment
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the most common endocrine emergencies in cats and dogs and can be fatal without medical intervention. Extreme hyperglycemia leading to hypovolemic shock and severe electrolyte imbalances in conjunction with ketone formation leading to acidemia characterize this complicated disease process. This article summarizes the pathophysiology of DKA and how to stabilize and initiate treatment in patients presenting with DKA. Take-Home Points Insulin and glucagon perform opposite functions to maintain a stable glucose level that fulfills cellular energy nee ..read more
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Hip, Hip, Hooray! Total Hip Arthroplasty in a 6-Year-Old Dog
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
Abstract This case report describes the process for diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia, surgical management, and postoperative recovery from a total hip arthroplasty in a 6-year-old dog. While a total hip arthroplasty is a large surgery that takes planning with a skilled surgeon trained in total hip arthroplasty, it has a high success rate and the ability to let patients return to a normal, functional, less painful life. Veterinary nursing care during the entire process is critical to achieve the patient’s best possible outcome. Take-Home Points Canine hip dysplasia is a common orthopedic cond ..read more
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Anesthetic Case Management of a Canine Patient With Severe Subaortic Stenosis Using Dexmedetomidine
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
1M ago
Abstract This case study describes the anesthetic management of a canine patient with severe subaortic stenosis undergoing surgical castration and urethral prolapse correction. The use of dexmedetomidine in patients with subaortic stenosis is controversial. However, in this instance, dexmedetomidine was utilized as part of a balanced anesthesia protocol without apparent complication. Take-Home Points Subaortic stenosis is one of the most common congenital cardiac diseases in dogs. Dexmedetomidine may be a useful anesthetic/analgesic for patients with subaortic stenosis. Dexmedetomidine is a r ..read more
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External Parasite Protection: Important for Your Pet … and for You!
Today's Veterinary Nurse
by Marissa Delamarter
3M ago
Many common parasites can not only make your pet itchy and uncomfortable, but also transmit certain diseases to both animals and people. Such diseases are known as zoonotic diseases. Keeping your pet safe from parasites also helps protect the rest of your family. Download PDF Fleas Fleas have been around for millions of years and are found all over the world. Diseases that people can get from fleas include plague and bartonellosis (“cat scratch fever”). Preventing fleas helps protect against these diseases and can be achieved with a variety of oral and topical medications. If a flea infestatio ..read more
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