Chronicles of Liminality
Los Angeles Review of Books
by Justin Gautreau
7h ago
The post Chronicles of Liminality appeared first on Los Angeles Review of Books ..read more
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Eurovision in Wartime
Los Angeles Review of Books
by LARB Intern
23h ago
The post Eurovision in Wartime appeared first on Los Angeles Review of Books ..read more
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Over Time, The Spirit Moves
Los Angeles Review of Books
by LARB Intern
1d ago
The post Over Time, The Spirit Moves appeared first on Los Angeles Review of Books ..read more
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Reconfiguring the Categories
Los Angeles Review of Books
by LARB Intern
2d ago
The post Reconfiguring the Categories appeared first on Los Angeles Review of Books ..read more
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Mirror Images: Disabled Writers on Frida Kahlo
Los Angeles Review of Books
by LARB Intern
2d ago
AFTER UNDERGOING JOINT replacement surgery, the unnamed narrator of Katherine Brabon’s new novel Body Friend encounters another disabled woman who, she is delighted to discover, “was shaped just the way [the narrator] was.” The two meet in a hydrotherapy group, where a physiotherapist assigns them identical exercises. Observing this woman, whose swollen joints, stiff neck, rashes, and limping gait resemble the narrator’s own, is “like watching a distant mirror.” They soon strike up a friendship, each “mov[ing] like mirror images of the other” in and out of the pool. But this other woman does n ..read more
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A Freak Flag Flown at Half-Mast
Los Angeles Review of Books
by AJ Urquidi
3d ago
PROMOTING HIS NEW FILM Kinds of Kindness earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival, director Yorgos Lanthimos stated his admiration for Luis Buñuel: “I’m passionate about his films. […] I love that his cinema is extremely funny, I love how he escapes convention.” Such tributes are always welcome, but when it comes to an artist whose origins abut on the primal scenes of both Surrealism and cinema itself, there’s plenty of influence to go around; in truth, any provoc-auteur who’s ever tried to scandalize (or brutalize) an audience owes Buñuel a debt of gratitude, or maybe a royalty check. Fo ..read more
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The Myth America Show
Los Angeles Review of Books
by LARB Intern
4d ago
IN BROADCAST TELEVISION’S experimental first years, from the late 1940s to the early 1950s, producers borrowed and adapted formats and representational strategies from existing media: soap operas and serials from radio, comedy-variety shows from vaudeville, and realist drama from so-called “legitimate” theater. On television, these stand-alone plays were united under the umbrella of the weekly anthology, and their theatrical ideals of authenticity, artistry, immediacy, and presence were indicated by their program titles: Kraft Television Theatre (NBC, 1947–58), The Philco Television Playhouse ..read more
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We Think Back Through Our Artistic Mothers
Los Angeles Review of Books
by LARB Intern
4d ago
FOR A NOVEL focussed on female creatives, Hannah Regel’s The Last Sane Woman (2024) opens with a somewhat beguiling line: “I want to read about women who can’t make things.” The comment comes from Nicola Long, a disaffected sculptor piecing together an income in London while also attempting to succeed creatively. Upon reflection, it’s an understandable desire. After all, who has the time or energy to make things? Not Nicola, who shifts between low-paying jobs like tutoring an uninterested teen and working as a nurse at a preschool. In a moment of particularly acute exhaustion and artist’s bloc ..read more
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We Thought You’d Died: A Conversation With Cristine Brache
Los Angeles Review of Books
by LARB Intern
5d ago
“WE DREAMT OF / Flowers and listening to women / Still, every time / we go to bed / we go to war.” Thus begins the titular poem in Cristine Brache’s latest collection, Goodnight Sweet Thing (2024), a rich, layered, lyrical meditation on mortality, embodiment, womanhood, and the various performances therein. It’s a poem I heard Cristine read for the first time at New York’s KGB Bar in late 2021, when our friendship was new, yet somehow still familiar. Now, several years and many conversations later, when I read “Goodnight Sweet Thing” to myself, I hear my friend’s voice in my head—“Sleep / drow ..read more
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The Last Avant-Garde
Los Angeles Review of Books
by LARB Intern
6d ago
CULTURE, NO MATTER what today’s feverish online discourse might tell us, is consummately, frustratingly ordinary. This is not a value judgment, but a simple truth, and remains as true today as it was when Raymond Williams argued it 60-plus years ago. Every historical moment and civilization has its art, its customs, and its contours expressing how it feels to be alive and conscious at its particular moment in time. Williams’s argument was already quite prescient when it was made. The postwar economic boom had pulled the Western world into spectacular realms: rock and roll, cinema, marvelous mo ..read more
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