Critical Race Theory: Learning from Kimberlé Crenshaw
The International Educator Blog
by Conrad Hughes
11h ago
Kimerlé Crenshaw has an extraordinary CV: with degrees from Cornell University (BA), Harvard University (JD) and the University of Wisconsin, Madison (LLM), she is a specialist in race and gender issues and professor at both the UCLA School of Law and Columbia Law School. She has published widely and is best known for founding critical race theory (CRT) and the construct of intersectionality. It was an immense privilege for me to hear her give the 2024 AERA keynote at Philadelphia just two days ago.  There was a special feeling in the air when she took to the stage, with rapturous cheerin ..read more
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Recalibration of Truth
The International Educator Blog
by John Mikton
3d ago
In our rapidly changing digital age, the idea of truth is undergoing a significant change. In the past, truth was often taken from shared experiences and clear agreements. Today, truth often is manipulated by social media, algorithmic biases, polarization, organizations, companies, and in more instances governments,  fueling the algorithms that influence what we see, hear, and believe. I refer to this as a recalibration of truth. This new landscape requires us to navigate the complexities of deep fakes: video and voice, misinformation, and the algorithmically curated digital environments ..read more
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GLOBAL BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS
The International Educator Blog
by Margriet Ruurs
5d ago
Books are much like moccasins – they allow you to walk a mile in someone else’s footsteps; to experience life from someone else’s viewpoint. Books share stories from other cultures and countries. Here are some beautiful new titles to enrich any (classroom) library. Waci! Dance! is an indigenous celebration of dance and life. Written by Sage Speidel and illustrated by Leah Dorion, the art dances off the pages in this picturebook as a small child is dressed and gets ready to join her elders in a festive dance to drums. The indigenous words are explained in a glossary in the back. This beautiful ..read more
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The difficulty of reintegrating into the world as you once knew it after an international education
The International Educator Blog
by Conrad Hughes
1w ago
I have often heard this argument: graduates of international schools struggle to adapt to non-international environments, including their own. After years in a type of international bubble, the transition to a local reality can be difficult. The thought that stands out to me is the whole idea of adaptation to life after school. In fact – and this is what I am going to argue in this piece – that process being difficult might actually be a good thing.   What if a great education causes a certain defamiliarisation by dint of the new concepts it evokes in the learner, the thresholds cros ..read more
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Rose-colored glasses – and beige and magenta …
The International Educator Blog
by Paul Magnuson
1w ago
I have been posting a series of classroom observations in a style I haven’t seen – a stream of consciousness reflection of what I think as I watch class unfold. Let me know if you’ve run across this type of observation before. Waiting for students to arrive at class. The teacher plays an orchestral version of a popular Mexican pop song through speakers on his desk. Soft, welcoming.  I know the lesson today is going to be about looking at literature through different perspectives, different lenses, as the teacher has told me. I think of rose colored glasses, that is, seeing everything in ..read more
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Mr. Slope Guy
The International Educator Blog
by Paul Magnuson
2w ago
Classrooms are different now. I mean, similar, too. Desks, a display at the front, the teachers explaining, the students taking notes. But the teacher in this math classroom stands in the back, writing on his iPad, the results visible at the front of the room on a screen, and the students are mostly taking notes on laptops. So it’s different, but the same. The teacher is explaining slopes with equations and graphs. He’s going over exercises from the homework before giving the students a new problem to work on.  Behind the students across the room are a couple of posters. One is Mr. Slope ..read more
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GLOBAL BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS
The International Educator Blog
by Margriet Ruurs
2w ago
Walking… it might be as beneficial as reading! So here are some wonderful reads about walking: walking people, walking animals, even walking trees. They include brand-new as well as long-loved titles. There are other wonderful books about the importance of walking, some of which I reviewed for this TIE column before, including A Long Walk for Water by Linda Sue Parks and Walking Home by Eric Walters. Follow up reading one of these books by going for a classroom walk! The Cat Who Walked The Camino, written and illustrated by Kate Spencer is a wonderful story for anyone who has walked, or hopes ..read more
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Finding Success
The International Educator Blog
by Daniel Kerr
2w ago
So recently I have been incredibly inspired by our students, across all of our divisions, and it has left me smiling from ear to ear. You see, over the past few weeks I have watched our students compete on the soccer field, in the pool, on the volleyball and badminton courts, on stage in the fantastic grade 7 and elementary school drama performances, and in the ISTA festival, MRISA junior football tournament, and Vex robotics showcases that we hosted here on campus. I have also seen them practicing in the music room for our highly anticipated talent show, and in classrooms as they learned, de ..read more
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What does an instructional coach do?
The International Educator Blog
by Paul Magnuson
1M ago
Source: https://alplearn.com/story/six-reasons-why-you-need-an-instructional-coach/ A colleague of mine was hired by an international school in Spain to be an instructional coach. Sounds interesting, I told her. I realized I was probably making up in my own head, however, what the term instructional coach actually meant. So I asked if we could do a short interview. I am recreating the conversation here, the words are not directly hers, but the meaning is. (And I ran this text past her to make sure it was accurate.) She had been working in the position for a year-and-a-half when we talked. Let ..read more
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In the Rhythm of Nature: Embracing Patience in Everyday Life
The International Educator Blog
by Matthew Piercy
1M ago
“Place-based education? We have it all,” a colleague recently quipped. Though I agree, I am not so declarative. Instead, I seemingly find myself routinely in quiet appreciative contemplation of the place I live. Fittingly, this past week a friend shared an invitation to attend a storytelling event titled, “Where I Live.” Several eloquent stories were told and afterward, I was left considering my own stories.  As much of the world transitions out of Winter and into Spring, central to “my story” is the role of patience. Akin to deciduous trees which lose their leaves and go into a sort of h ..read more
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