Dark Parties: Unveiling Nonparty Communities in American Political Campaigns
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
2d ago
Dark Parties: Unveiling Nonparty Communities in American Political Campaigns By Stan Oklobdzija, University of California, Riverside Since 2010, independent expenditures have grown as a source of spending in American elections. A large and growing portion comes from “dark money” groups—political nonprofits whose terms of incorporation allow them to partially obscure their sources of income. I develop a new dataset of about 2,350,000 tax documents released by the IRS and use it to test a new theory of political spending. I posit that pathways for anonymous giving allowed interest groups to fo ..read more
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Three Political Science Professors Named 2024 Guggenheim Fellows of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
Political Science Now
by Karima Scott
3d ago
Each year, the Guggenheim Foundation awards approximately 175 fellowships to individuals making their mark in the social sciences, the natural sciences, the humanities, and the creative arts. This year, the Guggenheim Foundation has announced their list of 188 appointees in the United States and Canada chosen from nearly 3,000 applicants working across 52 scholarly disciplines, included are the 2024 Guggenheim Fellows in Political Science: Kosuke Imai, Professor of Government and of Statistics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Jan-Werner Müller, Roger Williams Straus Professor of Socia ..read more
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Voice and Balancing in US Congressional Elections
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
3d ago
Voice and Balancing in US Congressional Elections By Till Weber, University of New York If the median voter wrote the Constitution, every Tuesday would be Election Day. Consider the case of the United States: Halfway into a presidential term, congressional elections allow the people to adjust the course of federal policy. Two complementary mechanisms describe how this opportunity is embraced by centrists: a direct mechanism, which strengthens the out-party in Congress to “balance” the president’s policy impact, and an indirect mechanism, by which midterm voting serves to “v ..read more
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Under the Veil of Democracy: What Do People Mean When They Say They Support Democracy?
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
4d ago
Under the Veil of Democracy: What Do People Mean When They Say They Support Democracy? By Hannah S. Chapman, University of Oklahoma, Margaret C. Hanson, Arizona State University, Valery Dzutsati, Southern Illinois University, and Paul DeBell, Fort Lewis College Scholars have expressed concern over waning support for democracy worldwide. But what do ordinary citizens mean by the term “democracy,” and how do their definitions of democracy influence their support for it? Using global cross-national survey data, this study demonstrates that individual variation in the understanding of democracy is ..read more
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The Realignment of Political Tolerance in the United States
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
5d ago
The Realignment of Political Tolerance in the United States By Dennis Chong, University of Southern California, Jack Citrin, UC Berkeley Political Science, and Morris Levy, University of Southern California Studies conducted between the 1950s and 1970s found that the principles embodied in the First Amendment constituted a “clear norm” endorsed by large majorities of community leaders and virtually all legal practitioners and scholars. This consensus has since weakened under the strain of arguments that racist slurs, epithets, and other forms of expression that demean social identities are an ..read more
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Party Types in the Age of Personalized Politics
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
1w ago
Party Types in the Age of Personalized Politics By Gideon Rahat, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Democracies in general and political parties in particular have undergone political personalization in recent decades. The power balance between politicians (one or many) and the team (the party as a collegial entity) has changed, and existing party typologies are no longer suited to the analysis of today’s democratic politics. Although some new personalized party types have been added, what is missing is a systematic attempt to contrast them with the collegial option. This article proposes a new cl ..read more
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Partisanship in the #MeToo Era
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
1w ago
Partisanship in the #MeToo Era By Mirya R. Holman, University of Houston, and Nathan P. Kalmoe, University of Wisconsin-Madison Partisanship structures mass politics by shaping the votes, policy views, and political perceptions of ordinary people. Even so, substantial shifts in partisanship can occur when elites signal clear differences on a political issue and attentive citizens update their views of party reputations. Mismatched partisans who strongly care about the issue respond by changing parties in a process of “issue evolution” when writ large. Others simply update their views to match ..read more
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Are Stealth Democrats Really Committed to Democracy? Process Preferences Revisited
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
1w ago
Are Stealth Democrats Really Committed to Democracy? Process Preferences Revisited By Andrew J. Bloeser, Allegheny College, Tarah Williams, Allegheny College, Candaisy Crawford, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Brian M. Harward, Harvard University Scholarship on “stealth democracy” finds that many citizens want to avoid the debate and conflict that often come with democratic governance. This scholarship has argued that citizens adopt this posture because they are uncomfortable with disagreement and desire a more expedient political process that enables leaders to m ..read more
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The Lingering Influence of Historical Peripheries on Modern Voting Patterns
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
1w ago
In the APSA Public Scholarship Program, graduate students in political science produce summaries of new research in the American Political Science Review. This piece, written by Dirck de Kleer, covers the new article by Daniel Ziblatt, Harvard University, Hanno Hilbig, University of California, Davis, and Daniel Bischof, Aarhus University, “Wealth of Tongues: Why Peripheral Regions Vote for the Radical Right in Germany.” A recent study in the American Political Science Review by Daniel Ziblatt, Hanno Hilbig, and Daniel Bischof offers a novel perspective on voting behavior in Germany. Their stu ..read more
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A Man’s World? The Policy Representation of Women and Men in a Comparative Perspective
Political Science Now
by Clarissa Nogueira
1w ago
A Man’s World? The Policy Representation of Women and Men in a Comparative Perspective By Mikael Persson, University of Gothenburg, Wouter Schakel, University of Amsterdam, and Anders Sundell, University of Gothenburg Are the preferences of women and men unequally represented in public policies? This simple yet fundamental question has remained largely unexplored in the fast-growing fields of women’s representation and inequality in the opinion-policy link. Our study analyzes gender biases in policy representation using an original dataset covering 43 countries and four decades, with citizens ..read more
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