Desert Creatures by Kay Chronister
British Science Fiction Association
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2d ago
Review from BSFA Review 22 - Download your copy here ..read more
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Mores Voices from the Radium Age edited and introduced by Joshua Glenn
British Science Fiction Association
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2d ago
Review from BSFA Review 22 - Download your copy here. edited and introduced by Joshua Glenn identify as sf rather than the kind of iconic wonder-story such as , or post-Copernican moon-voyages, which later writers drew upon. Perhaps it is safer to simply take the nine stories here, published between 1901, and 1926 and ask what they bring to us ..read more
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Multiverses edited by Preston Grassmann
British Science Fiction Association
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2d ago
Review from BSFA Review 22 - Download your copy here. has three categories of story, Parallel Worlds, Alternate Histories and Fractured Realities, each one dealing with a different aspect of Multiversial theory. There are several stories and at least one poem in each of the categories, and while I’m not a fan of poetry, this made a nice diversion ..read more
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Tomorrow’s Parties: Life in the Anthropocene
British Science Fiction Association
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1w ago
Review from BSFA Review 22 - Download your copy here. , does this book end on a bummer: while it does at least offer the prospect of unexpected human companionship and solidarity in a world that is literally trying to kill you—a very hopepunk vibe, at least as I understand it—James Bradley’s closing story “After the Storm” is pretty bleak, and I wish I hadn’t read it just before lights-out. That said, it is one of the best stories in the book, and not only for its refusal to offer any of the easy endings to its protagonist (or, by extension, to us ..read more
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Suborbital 7
British Science Fiction Association
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1w ago
Review from BSFA Review 22 - Download your copy here ..read more
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Conquest
British Science Fiction Association
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1w ago
Review from BSFA Review 22 - Download your copy here. , first published back in 2014, was almost uncanny in its evocation of a bleached-out south-coast Englishness (sections of the novel being set in Hastings), whereas the Scottish-set (2021) feels simultaneously softer-edged but with a deeper incursion into fantasy. While the setting of moves between England, Scotland and France, allowing it to combine perspectives, it feels by the end that reality has been totally subsumed within the fantastic. I would be tempted to describe it as a changeling story, if it wasn’t so obviously also an alien i ..read more
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Lessons in Birdwatching
British Science Fiction Association
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1w ago
Review from BSFA Review 22 - Download your copy here ..read more
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Tales from a Robotic World: How Intelligent Machines Will Shape Our Future
British Science Fiction Association
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3w ago
Review from BSFA Review 21 - Download your copy here ..read more
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Brian W. Aldiss
British Science Fiction Association
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3w ago
Review from BSFA Review 21 - Download your copy here. Trilogy (1982 onwards), and his own critical appraisal of our genre ..read more
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The Trees Grew Because I Bled There: Collected Stories
British Science Fiction Association
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3w ago
Review from BSFA Review 21 - Download your copy here. Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke which ‘went viral’ and garnered considerable praise. This follow-up volume brings together eight disturbing short stories, several of them containing elements of body-horror ..read more
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