Newsletter: May 2024
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
1M ago
Newsletter: May 2024 [Note: I post my monthly newsletters to the blog with a one month delay. If you’d like to get them when they’re first shared, join my mailing list.] Hello everyone, and welcome to the month of May!   T. S. Eliot opens his poem The Waste Land by saying that “April is the cruellest month.” But for me, at least, this April wasn’t so bad. After wrapping up my online course on philosophy and death at the end of March, the pace of things has slowed and I’ve been able to turn my attention to projects with longer time horizons.   Mostly that’s involved working on a b ..read more
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Newsletter: April 2024
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
2M ago
Newsletter: April 2024 [Note: I post my monthly newsletters to the blog with a one month delay. If you’d like to get them when they’re first shared, join my mailing list.] Hello everyone, and welcome to April!   I’m starting the week with a refreshingly empty slate. Last week, we wrapped up meetings for my winter online course, Thinking about the End: Philosophy and Death. In our final week, we followed ecofeminist philosopher Val Plumwood “through the eye of the crocodile” into a view of human life as continuous with the rest of the natural world, where every organism needs to eat an ..read more
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Newsletter: March 2024
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
3M ago
Newsletter: March 2024 [Note: I post my monthly newsletters to the blog with a one month delay. If you’d like to get them when they’re first shared, join my mailing list.] Hello everyone, and happy March! I’m making the move today from my temporary home in Ucluelet to my longer-term home in Vancouver. I spent the last two months in a friend’s house on the wild west coast of Vancouver Island, which was a real treat in so many ways. But now it’s time to get back to city life. We’ve now passed the midway point in my winter online course, Thinking about the End: Philosophy and Death. In the la ..read more
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Animal Ethics and Environmental Ethics: What’s the Difference?
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
4M ago
Starting Points Animal Ethics and Environmental Ethics: What's the Difference? People who care about animals tend to care about the environment and vice versa. On a philosophical level, you can see how both forms of care are ways of making non-human beings matter. Advocates of animal ethics and of environmental ethics both stand against an anthropocentric ethics, according to which ethics is primarily or exclusively of the humans, by the humans, and for the humans. This way of framing the matter makes animal ethics and environmental ethics natural allies. But matters aren’t so simple. As th ..read more
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Newsletter: February 2024
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
4M ago
Newsletter: February 2024 [Note: I post my monthly newsletters to the blog with a one month delay. If you’d like to get them when they’re first shared, join my mailing list.] Hello everyone and welcome to February 2024—3.57% longer than your standard February! (This is a leap year, in case that reference confused you.) I’m writing to you in rainy Ucluelet, British Columbia, which averages half a metre of rain in January. Nearly half that amount has fallen in the past week. I’m living a short walk from the roiling Pacific Ocean and surrounded by thick rainforest and feeling very much in my ..read more
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Saints and Prophets
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
5M ago
Reflections Saints and Prophets After some time of studying Wittgenstein and Heidegger, the two oddly started to merge. They’re so obviously different in so many ways and yet it became increasingly hard for me to say what that difference was. One rough contrast that came to me was to say that Heidegger aspires to be a prophet and Wittgenstein aspires to be a saint. Maybe more a difference of style than of substance—although especially with these two thinkers, style and substance are hard to disentangle—but I’ve come to find the saint/prophet contrast more generally helpful. In this blog post ..read more
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Newsletter: January 2024
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
6M ago
Newsletter: January 2024 [Note: I post my monthly newsletters to the blog with a one month delay. If you’d like to get them when they’re first shared, join my mailing list.] Hello everyone, and happy new year! I hope 2024 is off to a good start for all of you. The start of 2024 finds me in Ucluelet, on the west coast of Vancouver Island, and a ten-minute walk from the roaring Pacific Ocean. I’m spending the first two months of the year in this magical location, subletting from a friend of mine who’s leading kayak tours in Antarctica (poor thing). I love the wild west coast of Vancouver Isl ..read more
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Newsletter: December 2023
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
7M ago
Newsletter: December 2023 [Note: I post my monthly newsletters to the blog with a one month delay. If you’d like to get them when they’re first shared, join my mailing list.] Hello everyone.   It’s December already! 2023 is drawing to a close! How did that happen and why did nobody warn me?   Among the things that are drawing to a close is my online course on environmental philosophy. After encounters with Ramachandra Guha’s environmentalism of the poor and Murray Bookchin’s social ecology in the last couple weeks, we’ll wrap things up with a look at the intractable problem of cl ..read more
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On “Bourgeois” Philosophy
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
7M ago
Reflections On "Bourgeois" Philosophy A lot of the work I’ve done in academic philosophy (such as it is) has straddled the boundary of so-called “analytic” and so-called “continental” philosophy. I like the precision and clarity of analytic philosophy but so much of the time it feels unimaginative and unadventurous. (The expectation of precision and clarity might be part of what nudges people in the direction of the unimaginative and unadventurous.) Especially on matters of value, it often seems settled from the outset that our minds or our hearts aren’t actually supposed to be changed in th ..read more
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Newsletter: November 2023
David Egan Philosophy
by David Egan
8M ago
Newsletter: November 2023 [Note: I post my monthly newsletters to the blog with a one month delay. If you’d like to get them when they’re first shared, join my mailing list.] Hello everyone, and welcome to November. I trust you all had a satisfyingly spooky Halloween. I spent Halloween evening communing with the ghost of ecofeminist philosopher Val Plumwood, who’s the subject of the fourth week of this autumn’s online course, The World Around Us: Philosophy and the Environment. For Plumwood, ethical universalism and deep ecology are the real horrors and she offers an ethics of care as an a ..read more
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