Off lead rushing dog
The Dog You Have NZ
by Lisa Evans
3d ago
I quite like dogs. But. The scenario: Two people, three dogs, all on lead, on a street, walking and having a relaxing enjoyable time one lovely weekend. Next thing, we looked up to see a large black dog running at us full speed with hackles up, half a block away from it's person. To the dogs we were with, this is the last thing they want so here is a picture of them getting ready: I do like dogs. But when I'm out with a dog on lead, that dog in my care is my priority. In the scenario above, one of these dogs is injured and selective of friends. One has a bad hip and does not like strange dogs ..read more
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What to expect when you're expecting (me to visit)
The Dog You Have NZ
by Lisa Evans
1w ago
When people reach out for help with their dogs, they need support, not judgement. If the door is open to a kinder way to train, - because training should be something we do WITH our animals, not TO them - then we can begin! Classes are a challenging environment and not suitable for every dog or situation. This is where one on one sessions come in. For these, I most often visit in your home because that's where people and their dog/s are most comfortable. Sometimes we may arrange to meet elsewhere but it depends on travel, timing and concerns. At the start, there will be several easy to answer ..read more
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Nose Notes Part One
The Dog Box
by Lisa Evans
2M ago
Take a big breath in your mouth and out your nose. Take a big breath in your nose....and out again. What did you smell? Likely, nothing at all unless you had a strong, new or offensive odour nearby. When you exhaled you pushed all the air out in one direction so if a new scent appeared in that moment, you wouldn't have detected it until the next time you inhaled. We have around 5 million sensors in our comparatively boring human noses. Dogs can have up to 60x that, with 300 million sensors allowing for a much more acute sense of smell. Think of a chocolate cake fresh out of the oven vs being a ..read more
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Ewwww Yummy
The Dog Box
by Lisa Evans
2M ago
Coprophagia. That word by itself doesn't seem so bad. But what does it mean? To eat faeces. Yes poop. This blog contains a lot of $@!#. Consuming faecal matter is revolting to humans however there are species who rely on it e.g. rabbits (technically they eat cecotropes but still...) There are even species who exist today, as one scenario goes, BECAUSE their ancestors eating human waste played a part in their eventual domestication. Dogs! When your cute furry little bundle of joy was born, his/her mother licked their genital area to stimulate nerves resulting in them going to the toilet. And th ..read more
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Nose notes part two
The Dog You Have NZ
by Lisa Evans
2M ago
In the early 1800s a Danish chap Ludwig Jacobsen discovered an organ in the roof of the mouth, in the nasal cavity that's specifically to do with olfaction – which is a weird sounding word that means the sense of smell. Humans have this too, but evolution has determined we don't need it, so it doesn't function as it used to – like your tail bone or appendix. The Flehmen Response is more obvious in some species who have this working vomeronasal organ, or more easily pronounced Jacobsen Organ. For example horses. When their lips are up, teeth bared, air is sucked in to the mouth where it enters ..read more
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Itsy bitsy spider climbed up the water spout....
The Dog Box
by Lisa Evans
2M ago
Kevin saw this, screamed as if it was a three metre high man eating zombie spider and ran. Susan saw Kevin's reaction, laughed and carried on with what she was doing. Tane picked the spider up and chased Kevin. Karen yelled and hit Kevin with a rolled up newspaper for knocking over her cup of tea. You can't avoid spiders, they're part of life so something is needed to stop Kevin acting the way he does. This could involve shutting Kevin in a room with spiders and expecting him to just get over it. When Kevin next sees a spider what will his reaction most likely be? Kevin's reaction could becom ..read more
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Female dogs in season or heat
The Dog Box
by Lisa Evans
2M ago
Instead of writing a whole blog, here's a link to some great information on what you need to know before your female dog's comes in to season or if you want to know more about what goes on: https://dundies.com.au/blogs/news/what-you-must-know-before-your-dogs-first-heat To add, in New Zealand there is the Dog Control Act 1996 (https://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1996/0013/latest/whole.html) I'm not expecting you to read the whole 'exciting' thing but there is a section relevant to females in heat and that is: 11. Female Dogs in Season 11.1. The owner of any bitch in season must not allo ..read more
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The ripple effect
The Dog Box
by Lisa Evans
2M ago
In March 2022 I was stationery behind a school bus at a roundabout and got rear-ended by the driver behind me who was on their cellphone. Three months on there were still physical side effects from the whiplash. Other implications from this (totally avoidable) situation: How anxious I was driving straight afterwards. How nervous I felt when cars drove behind me. Holding my breath at roundabouts or intersections in anticipation. How incredibly annoyed I got seeing anyone on the phone while they were driving. Being in a car with someone else driving - couldn't relax. What does this have to do wi ..read more
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Da heck is this!?
The Dog Box
by Lisa Evans
2M ago
While out walking, Marley spotted something that concerned him. To him, it was a weird thing in a weird place that didn't make sense. Being an intelligent human, I recognised it instantly as a rock in a car park. Marley however, stopped in his tracks and stared. He didn't growl, lunge, bark or try to run away, no hackles came up. He simply stopped. "Da heck?!" There are many ways I could have dealt with this. For example yanked on the leash because we were "meant to be walking," (another reason to think of walks as outings, sniffaris, adventures) yelled, dragged him along - though if I added t ..read more
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Rewards are...
The Dog Box
by Lisa Evans
2M ago
When it comes to training dogs, the first word that jumps to most minds when we hear "reward" is "treat." Consider thinking of a reward differently = a thing that reinforces behaviour. I use the word thing because it's not always food and it's not always us that can increase the likelihood of a behaviour ocurring again in the future. For people; If you work, the thing is money - how many of you would keep turning up and working so hard if you didn't get paid? (voluntary work aside...but even then your reward is that nice feeling you get by helping) If you win you may get a trophy, a gold star ..read more
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