Memories of the Past
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
5d ago
Editor’s Note, by Art Middlekauff The May 1952 issue of The Parents’ Review was dedicated to looking back. But this was no mere nostalgia or reminiscence; always the view was towards linking the work of Charlotte Mason in the past to the new work of the present and the future. Some articles touched on specific ..read more
Visit website
The Boy Jesus
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
2w ago
Editor’s Note, by Art Middlekauff On November 23, 1897, the Rev. Herbert Spenser Swithinbank (1853–1937) gave an address to the Dulwich Branch of the PNEU. His text was Luke 2:43 from the English Revised Version: “the boy Jesus tarried behind in Jerusalem.” By contrast, the King James Version reads, “the child Jesus tarried behind in ..read more
Visit website
A Modern-Day Olive Norton
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
2w ago
In January we ran a series of vintage articles by Olive Norton, a homeschool mother of the 1950s and ’60s who became the headmistress of a PNEU School. She had a special connection with history because it was her school that the daughters of Susan Schaeffer Macaulay attended, and thus it was through Mrs. Norton ..read more
Visit website
Habits at Home: A Conversation With Jennifer Pepito
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
2w ago
Charlotte Mason wrote, “Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life.” In other words, “parents and teachers should know how to make sensible use of a child’s circumstances (atmosphere) to forward his sound education; should train him in the discipline of the habits of the good life; and should nourish his life with ideas, the ..read more
Visit website
Art Studies
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
1M ago
Editor’s Note, by Art Middlekauff Charlotte Mason’s most obvious link to John Ruskin is found in her lengthy quotation from Mornings in Florence in Parents and Children. Less obvious is the link from Ruskin to the practice of picture study in the House of Education, the Parents’ Union School, and homeschools today. This fascinating piece ..read more
Visit website
Can Appreciation of Art Be Taught?
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
1M ago
Editor’s Note by Richele Baburina Little could Charlotte Mason imagine that one day the Annual Conference of the PNEU would be held at the House of Parliament. There, surrounded by portraits of England’s kings and queens, William Dyce’s oils of King Arthur and his court, along with mosaics, friezes, and sculptures depicting important moments in ..read more
Visit website
How to Preserve the Imaginative Power in Children
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
1M ago
Editor’s Note, by Art Middlekauff Readers of Charlotte Mason’s Home Education know the name Arthur Burrell from the chapter on recitation: “On this subject,” writes Charlotte Mason, “I cannot do better than refer the reader to Mr Arthur Burrell’s [book] Recitation.”[1] It is hard to imagine a stronger endorsement of Burrell’s1891 Recitation: A Handbook for ..read more
Visit website
An Uncommon Quarterly
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
2M ago
Imagine what it would be like to have a quiet growing place for parents in a digitally saturated world. A place where parents and educators could be mentored and instructed in Charlotte Mason’s ideas without looking at a screen. A place where the beauty of the printed page could speak to the heart. Cara Williams ..read more
Visit website
Sunday School Teaching
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
2M ago
Editor’s Note, by Art Middlekauff As Charlotte Mason’s ideas become more and more popular in homeschools and other kinds of schools, an increasingly common question is whether her philosophy can be applied within the church context, such as in Sunday school. At Charlotte Mason Poetry, we have shared two accounts from people who have introduced ..read more
Visit website
Picture Study, by Madeline Lambert
Charlotte Mason Poetry
by
2M ago
Editor’s Note, by Art Middlekauff Madeline C. M. Lambert (1892–1965) arrived at the House of Education in 1912 where she learned the art of living and teaching from Charlotte Mason herself. Miss Lambert then cared for her “widowed father until she was free to teach.” Then in 1919, she was invited to help Laura Faunce ..read more
Visit website

Follow Charlotte Mason Poetry on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR