For our city to beat the heat, it’s going to take a whole lot of green
Grid Magazine
by Kyle Bagenstose
2w ago
By Kyle Bagenstose and Adam Litchkofski If you’re reading this story when it’s still hot off the press, odds are you’re probably pretty warm yourself. Another July has arrived in Philadelphia, and they ain’t what they used to be. From 1939 through the end of the 20th century, Philadelphia’s average air temperature in this quintessential summer month was 77.6 degrees Fahrenheit, according to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In the 24 Julys since, only four have dipped back below that 20th century average, the last coming in 2009. Since then, the new mean is ..read more
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Grid talks with journalist and author Jeff Goodell about the invisible natural disaster: extreme temperatures
Grid Magazine
by Bernard Brown
2w ago
The title of Austin, Texas-based journalist Jeff Goodell’s 2023 book, “The Heat Will Kill You First: Life and Death on a Scorched Planet,” should leave no doubt as to the topic and its urgency. Grid spoke with Goodell at the end of May about the most lethal and least visible natural disaster on the planet. “The Heat Will Kill You First: Life and Death on a Scorched Planet” by Jeff Goodell. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. Why the heat first, not the wildfires or hurricanes? I happened to be in Phoenix on a summer day in the summer of 2018. The temperature was 115 that day ..read more
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Approaching its ten-year mark, Indego Bike Share shows improvement in equity
Grid Magazine
by Kyle Bagenstose
2w ago
It was a warm, late spring morning and traffic was light in West Philadelphia. Not the vehicular kind: the lurching, beeping and swerving on thoroughfares such as Market and Chestnut were as hectic as ever. But things were slow around several Indego Bike Share stations that now pepper the corridor from 50th to 60th streets. For the better part of an hour, a station at 56th and Chestnut streets went unutilized until Gregory Isaac approached. The middle-aged professional explained that he used to live outside of the city and would drive in, park in a free area and use Indego — Philadelphia’s joi ..read more
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An effective way to fund municipal sustainability projects is taking hold
Grid Magazine
by Amber X. Chen
2w ago
It’s clearer than ever that cities must finance more green projects as the impacts of climate change intensify, but many are struggling to make progress towards their climate goals. Unsurprisingly, funding is among the biggest obstacles. Urban sustainability overhauls — like transitioning to renewable energy sources — can be expensive up front, though they present greater long-term impacts that are more cost-saving than the status quo. One such project is the $91 million Philadelphia Streetlight Improvement Project (PSIP), which began in August 2023. The project, which is the largest energy co ..read more
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There is no such thing as PFAS-free synthetic turf. The City is installing it anyway
Grid Magazine
by Amber X. Chen
2w ago
South Philadelphia dad and Little League coach Alex Kaslowitz remembers watching the Phillies play at Veterans Stadium, one of the first to install artificial turf in 1970. Since then, as reported in the Philadelphia Inquirer, six former Phillies have died from a rare form of brain cancer linked to the turf they played on. “That really hit me hard because I can literally picture these players. I can picture the stadium and the heat — you would even see it was cloudy on the very hot days,” Kaslowitz said. “And you know, the catcher’s sucking in all this air … and then to hear that there was a c ..read more
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Youth internship program sets its sights on year-round, paid placements
Grid Magazine
by Constance Garcia-Barrio
2w ago
Natalie Sanchez had no inkling that the summer job she’d heard about through her high school, Philadelphia Virtual Academy, would launch her toward a new life. In 2021, Sanchez, then 17, worked as an intern at PECO Energy Company, a position she landed through the nonprofit Philadelphia Youth Network (PYN). “We [interns] worked 20 hours a week,” Sanchez says. “My projects included developing a slideshow to explain the power factor, which relates to energy efficiency on your PECO bill. We also learned skills like networking, collaborating and saving money,” says Sanchez, who, like other interns ..read more
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The Philadelphia Orchard Project is cultivating fruit that could thrive in a hotter city
Grid Magazine
by Ben Seal
2w ago
When the U.S. Department of Agriculture released an updated map of hardiness zones last November, gardeners and farmers in the Philadelphia region — and across much of the United States — found affirmation of the warmer weather they’ve been experiencing since the map’s last refresh in 2012. In just over 10 years, nearly half the country shifted into a new zone, meaning new plants can survive through increasingly mild winters while others are now a better fit farther north. In 1990, Philadelphia was split between zones 6b and 7a, but now nearly all of it is entrenched in zone 7b, indicating a 1 ..read more
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Video: I rode along with the PPA bike patrol to answer all your questions
Grid Magazine
by Craig Santoro
1M ago
View this post on Instagram A post shared by Grid Magazine (@gridmagazine) The post Video: I rode along with the PPA bike patrol to answer all your questions appeared first on Grid Magazine ..read more
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At Philly gala for 5th Annual Black Birders Week, flashes of progress
Grid Magazine
by Kyle Bagenstose
1M ago
Among the many reporting experiences accumulated in my 13-year career as a journalist, a walk in Philadelphia’s John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge in 2022 stands out as one of the most memorable. I was invited there by various leaders from the Black birding community, who were in town to celebrate the 3rd Annual Black Birders Week. The get together at Heinz was to help inform what I thought would be a heavy story. Black Birders Week is a national initiative that grew out of the generation-defining summer of 2020, when a global pandemic, high-stakes presidential election, intensifying climate ..read more
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Sponsored Content: Aaji’s finds a growing market for lonsa, and gives back
Grid Magazine
by GridPhilly
1M ago
Launched in 2021, Aaji’s is first and foremost, a family affair. Co-founders Rajus and Poorva Korde created the brand based on Rajus’s grandmother’s tomato lonsa recipe — a tomato-based dish that incorporates coastal Indian spices like asafoetida and turmeric. Aaji’s currently offers an original tomato lonsa, as well as garlic, spicy and spicy garlic flavors. “We take these tomatoes and we cook it down for several hours until it turns into this really lovely consistency,” Poorva says. It makes a delicious topping and can also be used as a base or ingredient to add a punch of flavor to a variet ..read more
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