A Watershed Moment in Naval History
Yale University Press » Military History
by M'Baye, Fatou
3w ago
Paul Kennedy— The soft, warm waters of the Mediterranean lapped gently against the sides of the two great warships anchored across from each other in Malta’s historic Grand Harbour in the summer of 1938. The fifteenth-century porticos of the Knights of St. John stood out behind the vessels. An Admiralty tug moved close by, and small boats occasionally went back and forth to the landings, but little else stirred. The world was quiet at that time, so it seemed, although not fully at peace. A keen-eyed observer might have noticed that across the top of the Hood’s and Barham’s giant gun-turrets la ..read more
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The American Revolution, Today
Yale University Press » Military History
by Balasubramanian, Aruna
3w ago
Richard Brookhiser— History leans heavily on words—and that’s fine, says every publishing house. But there are other media that tell the story. The civil rights movement and America’s wars from Vietnam forward were impressed on us by photojournalism and television. World War II lives most vividly these days in movies, from Casablanca to Saving Private Ryan. The Civil War spoke through the performances of memorable orators (Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Lincoln’s old friend and Confederate vice president Alexander Stephens). But it also sang in “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” and the ..read more
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Cannabis and Hashish in the West: The Colonial Origins
Yale University Press » Military History
by Balasubramanian, Aruna
2M ago
Mike Jay— The first sustained interaction between the modern West and the hashish eaters of the Arab world occurred during Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt in 1798, which culminated in a ban on the use of hashish by French troops in October 1800. Hashish, according to the decree by General Jacques-François Menou (Napoleon himself had already left the country) caused its users to ‘lose reason and fall into a violent delirium, which often leads them to commit excesses of all kinds’.1 No direct testimony was cited from hashish-using soldiers themselves, and it seems that Menou intended the ban to ali ..read more
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The Streets of Mogadishu
Yale University Press » Military History
by ceb95
3M ago
N. W. Collins— “Every American has seen the shocking images from Somalia,” President George H. W. Bush commenced the live address from the Oval Office.1 Announcing the new mission to East Africa, President Bush presented the national objective: to lead a global coalition to ease the humanitarian crisis in the region, to serve as a catalyst for the community of nations to act. “I have given the order . . . to move a substantial American force into Somalia . . . As I speak a Marine amphibious ready group, which we maintain at sea, is offshore Mogadishu.” The coalition would set out to avert huma ..read more
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Ep. 128 — The Remarkable Stories of Women in British Intelligence
Yale University Press » Military History
by ceb95
6M ago
From spies in the Belgian network “La Dame Blanche,” knitting coded messages into jumpers, to those who interpreted aerial images and even ran entire sections, Helen Fry shows just how crucial women were to British intelligence. In this episode of the Yale University Press Podcast, we talk with Helen Fry about Women in Intelligence: The Hidden History of Two World Wars. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pandora | Spotify | Soundcloud The post Ep. 128 — The Remarkable Stories of Women in British Intelligence appeared first on Yale University Press ..read more
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Why the Crusades Matter
Yale University Press » Military History
by Balasubramanian, Aruna
8M ago
Christopher Tyerman— The crusades offer features to fascinate and disturb modern audiences. Surviving evidence–literary, archival, archaeological, visual and material–allows access in some detail to individual experiences as well as large movements, to perpetrators but also to opponents and victims. Much of the western historical record of the Levant crusades presents a rare instance of history written by losers. The physical legacy is extensive. The drama of events involving armed conflict across vast geographic distances and sharp cultural, communal and faith boundaries, together with the cl ..read more
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Rome’s Secret Disrupter
Yale University Press » Military History
by M'Baye, Fatou
8M ago
Peter Stothard — Marcus Licinius Crassus was in his early sixties in the summer of 54 BCE, fit but old for a Roman army commander, red-cloaked and almost ready to cross the Euphrates for an unprecedented eastern war. Crassus was a meticulous planner, a master of political and financial risk. In these hottest months before the invasion he was making detail the servant of his grand design, just as he had all his life: the heavy equipment of his men, their means of supply, the guides that he needed for where later commanders would have maps. His war was to be waged at the edges of what he or any ..read more
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The Cookery Book
Yale University Press » Military History
by ceb95
9M ago
Helen Fry— During wartime women were a valuable source of intelligence-gathering because they could move much more freely in occupied countries than men. They used their “invisibility” to gather and deliver sensitive and valuable military information for the Allies. They learned the various trades within spycraft, including the use of invisible ink, setting up safe houses, dead letter boxes, and operating in codes. Their secret reports could be hidden inside ordinary objects, such as packing paper, box covers, and bookplates, then smuggled to the head of an intelligence network. Women were hig ..read more
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Ep. 120—A Global History of Wars
Yale University Press » Military History
by ceb95
9M ago
In this episode of the Yale University Press Podcast, we talk with award-winning sociologist Michael Mann about his new book, On Wars. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | Soundcloud The post Ep. 120—A Global History of Wars appeared first on Yale University Press ..read more
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The Tripolar Problem
Yale University Press » Military History
by ceb95
1y ago
Andrew F. Krepinevich, Jr.— The past year has witnessed the continuing decline in U.S.-China relations. Last February, Chinese president Xi Jinping declared his friendship with Vladimir Putin had “no limits,” only days before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. In August, angered by a U.S. congressional delegation’s visit to Taiwan, China conducted large-scale military exercises surrounding the island as part of an ongoing campaign of intimidation. Now there are revelations of a Chinese reconnaissance balloon breaching U.S. airspace. Despite Beijing’s denials that the balloon was for meteorological ..read more
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