Seminoles Taught American Soldiers a Thing or Two About Guerrilla Warfare
HistoryNet » Military History
by Jon Guttman
2M ago
The word “Seminole” is derived from the Muscogean word simanó-li, or “runaway,” reflecting a common heritage, as Upper Creeks from Alabama, Lower Creeks from Georgia, other affiliated tribes and escaped African slaves all sought sanctuary in Spanish Florida. There they mixed with one another, adapted to their surroundings, traded with Britain, Spain and the United States and came to be collectively recognized as one of the Five Civilized Tribes (along with the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Creek/Muscogee) of the American Southeast. Not civilized enough for some, apparently, for when t ..read more
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An SAS Rescue Mission Mission Gone Wrong
HistoryNet » Military History
by Gavin Mortimer
2M ago
Norman Crockatt is not a well-known name, but the British intelligence officer was responsible for one of the most controversial decisions of World War II. When the War Office in London created Military Intelligence Section 9 (MI9) on December 23, 1939, it chose the 45-year-old Crockatt to head the new organization. The former head of the London Stock Exchange, he was seen as “the right sort of chap” for the post despite his scant experience in military intelligence. MI9’s mission was to help British military personnel escape and evade the enemy. That might mean smuggling maps and miniature c ..read more
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Could These American Paratroopers Stop the Germans from Reaching Utah Beach on D-Day?
HistoryNet » Military History
by James M. Fenelon
3M ago
O n the evening of June 5, 1944, Louis Leroux, his wife, and their six children scrambled atop an embankment near their farm to investigate the sounds of distant explosions. Three miles south, Allied fighter-bombers were attacking bridges over the Douve River on France’s Cotentin Peninsula. In the fading twilight the family watched silhouetted warplanes peel away from the glowing tracers of German anti-aircraft fire that stabbed skyward. When the excitement ended, the Lerouxs returned home to bed, unaware that their farm would play a vital role in the Allied liberation of France.  Their ..read more
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The Explosion of Mount Hood
HistoryNet » Military History
by Steven Trent Smith
3M ago
The motor launch tied up at the small-boat pier in Seeadler Harbor in New Guinea to disembark a dozen men from the ammunition carrier USS Mount Hood. The date was November 10, 1944. Led by the ship’s communications officer, Lieutenant Lester Hull Wallace, the group had several errands to run on shore before returning to the ship. Wallace planned to take a couple of men with him to the fleet post office to pick up mail. Others were headed to headquarters to obtain charts and manuals. Two had dental appointments and two were on their way to the brig. The sailors were just splitting up when a tr ..read more
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The Poignant Tale Behind a Celebrated Civil War Sketch
HistoryNet » Military History
by George Skoch
3M ago
Odds are there isn’t a Civil War buff living who hasn’t seen a copy of this remarkable pencil sketch (above) by special artist Edwin Forbes, which Forbes labeled as “William J. Jackson, Sergt. Maj. 12th N.Y. Vol.—Sketched at Stoneman’s Switch, near Fredricksburg [sic], Va. Jan. 27th, 1863.” The young noncom has gazed back at us across the years from countless publications and exhibits. Rendered with camera-like honesty, it is arguably among the best drawings of a common soldier done during the Civil War. Writing about his work in general, Forbes assured viewers, “fidelity to fact is… the firs ..read more
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You Might Be Surprised to Learn What This Resort Hotel Did During World War II
HistoryNet » Military History
by Barbara Noe Kennedy
3M ago
Rounding the bend past the guard gate, I catch my breath when I spy the Greenbrier resort’s main building. The Georgian-style structure, wedding-cake white and six stories high, looms above flower-speckled grounds that cover 7,000 acres and include cottages, five golf courses, tennis courts, and hiking and bridle trails. This posh estate was established in 1778 in White Sulphur Springs, Virginia (now West Virginia), around a natural hot spring (though the main building wasn’t built until 1858 and since has been expanded). Five presidents stayed here before the Civil War and famous guests sinc ..read more
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Civil War Generals Never Forgot the Blood and Lost Friends in the US Showdown with Mexico
HistoryNet » Military History
by Frank Jastrzembski
3M ago
In September 1861, while stationed in Paducah, Ky., Private John H. Page of the 1st Illinois Light Artillery received notice that he had been promoted to second lieutenant in the 3rd U.S. Infantry and was to report for duty in Washington, D.C. After packing his belongings, Page caught a boat for Cairo, Ill., where he reported to the general in charge of the District of Southeast Missouri before obtaining transportation for the next leg of his journey. Page immediately recognized Ulysses S. Grant perched behind a wire screen at a local bank where the general had set up his headquarters. “He lo ..read more
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Even in the Headline-Grabbing World of Drones, the Predator Stands Out
HistoryNet » Military History
by Jon Guttman
4M ago
Specifications Height: 6 feet 11 inches Wingspan: 55 feet 2 inches Empty weight: 1,130 pounds Maximum takeoff weight: 2,250 pounds Power plant: Rotax 914F 115 hp four-cylinder turbocharged engine driving a twin-blade constant-speed pusher propeller Fuel capacity: 665 pounds Cruising speed: 80–100 mph Maximum speed: 135 mph Range: 770 miles Ceiling: 25,000 feet Armament: Two AGM-114 Hellfire air-to-surface missiles; or four AIM-92 Stinger air-to-air missiles; or six AGM-176 Griffin air-to-surface missiles Military use of remotely piloted aircraft, or drones, dates to World War I experiments w ..read more
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Marine Corps’ Deadliest, Charles ‘Chuck’ Mawhinney, Dies at 75
HistoryNet » Military History
by Jon Simkins
4M ago
Ask any Marine about the service’s greatest snipers, and a flurry of references to the legendary Gunnery Sgt. Carlos Hathcock are sure to flood the conversation. Yet it was another sniper, Charles “Chuck” Mawhinney, who quietly surpassed Hathcock as the Marine Corps’ deadliest. The Lakeview, Oregon, native recorded 103 confirmed kills in Vietnam over the span of 16 months in 1968 and 1969. By the time he returned home, he’d also been credited with another 216 “probable kills,” a classification for incidents in which the act of confirming a kill in an active war zone would jeopardize safety. M ..read more
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World War I Exhibit Explores War’s Impact on Children
HistoryNet » Military History
by Sarah Sicard
4M ago
The “Greatest Generation” is renowned for military heroism during World War II. But before this famed demographic signed up to fight for Uncle Sam, many were shaped by a childhood spent amid World War I. It’s not surprising, then, that the First World War instilled an entire generation with a brand of patriotism that could prompt risking everything to preserve the American dream. That exact experience is currently showcased in the National World War I Museum’s exhibit “The Little War,” an exploration of childhood between 1914 and 1918. The exhibit’s items, according to Specialist Curator Nata ..read more
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