Spectrum House: An Autism-Ready Family Destination
Thinking Person"s Guide To Autism
by Shannon Des Roches Rosa
1w ago
Our families may not get to travel much, if at all. One of the many reasons is lack of truly accommodating vacation destinations, meaning ones with autism-specific sensory, space, and safety features. To address this gap, John Ordover and his wife Carol Greenburg* created an autism vacation oasis on Fire Island, New York, and are calling it Spectrum House. The listing describes Spectrum House as “your perfect summer getaway designed with the utmost care and consideration for families with children on the spectrum, including privacy fencing and a sensory gym. This thoughtfully designed hom ..read more
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How The Progressive Media Sells Out Autistic People
Thinking Person"s Guide To Autism
by Shannon Des Roches Rosa
2w ago
Content note: This article discusses school shootings, filicide, bullying, and suicide If autistic people like my teenage son make you uneasy, you’re wrong—but it may not entirely be your fault. Our media conditions its audiences to fear and pity people with disabilities. And it’s not just sensationalistic, clickbait media outlets that impugn the rights and basic humanity of autistic people. Respected, progressive publications and writers can be just as reactionary. But because we tend to trust such “thought leaders” as both intellectually rigorous and socially fair, their ableism often goes u ..read more
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On Talking With Neurotypicals
Thinking Person"s Guide To Autism
by Javan
3w ago
Trying to talk with neurotypicals can be a real pain. We all know what often happens, right? Confusion and misunderstandings. Sometimes even hurt feelings. Let’s be honest: It’s practically impossible to talk with neurotypicals, even about the simplest things, without offending them in some way. We autistics tend to be extremely and precisely logical. Neurotypicals? Not so much. They claim to like logic, but their version of it is usually so cockeyed, convoluted and mixed up with emotion that it can’t accurately be called logic at all. The bottom line is this: They just don’t think like we do ..read more
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How “Autism Warrior Parents” Harm Autistic Kids
Thinking Person"s Guide To Autism
by Shannon Des Roches Rosa
1M ago
Content note: This article discusses abuse and filicide. Parenting approaches differ, but mostly, everything we consider “good parenting” fulfills two basic needs: It makes children feel safe, and it makes them feel loved. Parents and non-parents alike tend to scorn any parenting approach that doesn’t meet these goals. That is, unless the children in question are autistic—in which case parents are too often encouraged to pursue approaches that traumatize and alienate those kids. The most enthusiastic and unrepentant of these people are called  “Autism Warrior Parents,” and you need to kno ..read more
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What Makes a Home Feel Safe For Autistic People?
Thinking Person's Guide To Autism
by Shannon Des Roches Rosa
2M ago
Autistic children and adults often lack access to spaces that make them feel safe, or allow them to decompress and be themselves without interference or unwelcome scrutiny. Sometimes a lack of safe spaces is no one’s fault, as when living quarters have limited size or privacy. But too often, autistic safety comfort, ease are either not considered due to a lack of autism understanding, or rejected outright due to insistence on complying with non-autistic lifestyle approaches. While ideally all non-autistic people and professionals would understand what makes spaces feel safe for autistic people ..read more
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Let Autistic People Make Their Own Choices!
Thinking Person's Guide To Autism
by Luce Greenwood
2M ago
As my brother queued up to go on the big slide at the pool, I had had to sit and watch behind the glass, where I been dragged earlier by my nan. The slide was yet another thing I had to miss out on because my autism diagnosis made my grandparents think I wasn’t capable of doing the same things as other children.  This not allowing me to make my own choices started when I was very young. My teacher forced me to go to the shops with her on a school trip, rather than go round Whitby with the other students. I was never told the reasoning, but to the school staff being autistic meant not bein ..read more
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Our Uniquely Human Perspectives on Autism and Parenting
Thinking Person's Guide To Autism
by Shannon Des Roches Rosa
2M ago
Neurodiversity powers activate! Our editors Carol Greenburg and Shannon Rosa are on the latest episode of Barry Prizant’s and Dave Finch’s Uniquely Human podcast. We discuss our own personal histories, including Carols’ realization that she was autistic after her son’s diagnosis, plus Shannon’s unfortunate early hoodwinking by and furious rejection of autism misinformation—the latter having led to the creation of Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism. We also talk about media bias in autism topics, and how journalists and outlets can do better by autistic people. Podcast audio and transcript inclu ..read more
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Accepting Compliments While Autistic
Thinking Person's Guide To Autism
by Anonymous
3M ago
Many autistic people find accepting compliments and being kind to ourselves difficult, especially if our experience has been that other people lambast us if we dare to exist openly while autistic. Struggling with self-acceptance is a vulnerability we autistics would often prefer to hide. Personally, I used to dismiss any and all compliments. If someone praised me, I would close up emotionally and not express acknowledgment or thanks. It’s only more recently—following some social struggles and a subsequent period of self-reflection—that I can recognize how many of the compliments I receive ..read more
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Talking With Dinosaur Star and Co-Creator Ashley Storrie
Thinking Person's Guide To Autism
by Shannon Des Roches Rosa
3M ago
I am cautiously pleased about autistic representation in the current streaming era, in which shows like the excellent Hulu series Dinosaur, co-created by and starring autistic Scottish comedian Ashley Storrie, are balancing out stereotype-laced series like Atypical. Dinosaur features Ashley as Nina, a Glasgow paleontologist (dino scientist) whose life is comfortingly routine-anchored—until her best friend and sister Evie upends everything with a surprise wedding engagement. Storrie talked with TPGA about incorporating her own autistic experiences into the series, why she finds N ..read more
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ASD Band: A (Mostly) Refreshing Autism Rock Documentary
Thinking Person's Guide To Autism
by Sarah Kurchak
3M ago
For the majority of its 53 minute runtime, ASD Band: The Movie offers a straightforward, fly on the wall account of a band writing and recording songs while preparing for the first live gig. This might sound like a criticism, or at least faint praise. If the documentary were about another bog standard rock group who has seen this kind of cinematic treatment countless times before, that would probably be my intention. Considering the state of autistic representation in both music and film, though, giving this particular band the classic rock doc treatment is one of the most revolutionary choice ..read more
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