Algae from Above: Scientists Pilot Aerial Mapping of Park Rocky Intertidal Zones
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
10M ago
For decades, San Francisco Bay Area Network biologists have used on-the-ground monitoring techniques to gather data on how small rocky intertidal areas along the central California coast are responding to changing environmental conditions. Now, they are exploring aerial mapping as a new method to create a comprehensive record of these important ecosystems and how they are shifting ..read more
Visit website
Tax Incentives
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
..read more
Visit website
Curriculum
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
..read more
Visit website
Where Are All The Sea Stars?
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
Since 2013, sea stars from Alaska to Mexico have been dying in droves of a mysterious disease referred to as sea star wasting syndrome. Symptoms typically include the appearance of white lesions followed by tissue decay, body fragmentation and death, often within only a few days. Sea star die-offs are not necessarily unusual, but this one is unprecedented in terms of the numbers affected and the extensive area impacted ..read more
Visit website
Sea Star Recovery Slow in Bay Area National Parks
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
Sea stars like ochre stars used to be abundant in Bay Area National Parks, but in 2013 park biologists saw a sharp decline in both the size and number of sea stars along park shorelines. Scientists are still looking for the cause of the mysterious “sea star wasting syndrome” behind this population crash. The disease has persisted along much of the Pacific coast, including in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and Point Reyes National Seashore ..read more
Visit website
New Rocky Intertidal Biodiversity Surveys Seek a Broader Perspective For Monitoring Change
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
Every year, National Park Service biologists conduct intertidal surveys at sites along the San Francisco Bay Area coast, contributing to growing long-term data sets. Typically, they survey fixed plots, focusing on small areas of the reef and specific communities like mussels, barnacles, and algae. This year, they have also adapted an approach of sampling large areas of the reef at once and documenting all observed species along a set of transect lines ..read more
Visit website
Microplastics on National Park Beaches
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
Every beachgoer has probably noticed plastic trash littering their favorite beaches, however remote. A new study of microplastic distribution on national park beaches indicates that whichever one you visit, there is probably also some amount of plastic that is harder to see, mixed in with the sand between your toes ..read more
Visit website
“Why Black Abalone?”: The Duality of Black Abalone in California
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
Black abalone are endangered marine snails. When I told people that I was making a podcast about them, I was often met with the question, “Why black abalone?” If you are curious too, you’re in the right place. I hope to elucidate why black abalone represent an interesting case study in delicate balances: between marine and terrestrial, ancient and Anthropocene, and vulnerability and resiliency in the context of roles they play in their communities and in ours ..read more
Visit website
No Clear Cause for Recent Sea Star Wasting Disease Found
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
A new study has revealed no one cause of the disease, which hit populations of the keystone predator ochre sea star particularly hard in 2014 and 2015. The authors used data from 90 sites ranging from Alaska to southern California to try to determine what caused the outbreak ..read more
Visit website
Sea Cave Monitoring Continues Along Golden Gate’s Shores
NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog
by
1y ago
Staff from the Alaska Regional Office and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area Natural Resources Division are continuing to explore and map sea caves and related features along the park’s coast. With surveys of the Marin Headlands coastline completed—but just some of San Francisco’s shorelines surveyed—they have already found and mapped over 100 caves and cave-like features ..read more
Visit website

Follow NPS » Marine Invertebrate and Rocky Intertidal Blog on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR