Indian medicinal plants : an early nineteenth century illustrated reference book by the Indian physicians K.R. Kirtikar and B.D. Basu LSHTM Blog No. 9. February 2024.
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by lshps8
1w ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog In those parts of the world with a written language, the first organisms in the natural world to be studied, documented and figured were plants in recognition of their economic value in agriculture, nutrition, health and well-being.  In Europe these herbals, as they are called, were hand-written in Greek and Latin and often included magnificent illustrations. After the invention of printing in the 15th century herbals had a wide circulation in print in the classical languages before being translated into English and other languages.  ..read more
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Understanding puerperal fever in the eighteenth century : the work of John Leake (1729-1792), man-midwife. LSHTM Rare Books Blog No. 8 January 2024.
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by lshps8
1M ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog In the 18th and 19th centuries and until the 20th Century the death of women in childbirth or shortly afterwards was a common occurrence. One early treatise on puerperal fever was written by John Leake, a physician and male midwife :  Practical observations on the childbed fever, first published in 1772. Portrait of John Leake by Godfrey Kneller Leake was born at Ainstable in Cumberland the son of a curate. His medical education included an apprenticeship with a London surgeon followed by training on the continent and the award of an MD a ..read more
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Johann Gottfried Bremser’s early 19th century medical books on parasitic worms with hand-coloured plates. LSHTM Rare Books Blog Series No. 7. August 2023
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by lshps8
7M ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog The Austrian physician Johann Gottfried Bremser (1767-1827) was born in Wertheim am Main in present-day Germany. He studied medicine in Jena and Vienna where he obtained a licence to practice medicine in 1797. Bremser made a special study of parasitic worm infections in humans and travelled to Paris in 1815 to carry out further research.  He experimented and developed remedies against worm infestations and he also treated poorer sections of the community. He actively promoted the benefits of vaccination against smallpox. He died in Vienna ..read more
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Under the lens : London’s water examined in the 1853-4 cholera pandemic. LSHTM Rare Books Blog series No. 4. May 2022.
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by lshps8
1y ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog Figure 1:  Colourful organisms in a sample of the water supplied by the Southwark & Vauxhall Company to St. Thomas’s Hospital in 1854 as seen under the microscope (Hassall 1855a : page 248, Plate 19). This illustration of a microcosm of the natural world in London’s water in 1854 was published in a book in the School’s Library, Report of the Medical Council … in relation to the cholera-epidemic of 1854 (General Board of Health. Medical Council 1855). It formed part of the evidence gathered for a government investigation at a time when ..read more
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Observations on Smallpox by the 9th Century Persian Physician Rhazes (865-925) : LSHTM Rare Books Blog series No. 3.
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by lshps8
1y ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog Figure 1: Rhazes, Princeton University Chapel c. 1924–1928 (Picture by David Keddie – licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0) Rhazes (full-name: Muhammad ibn Zakariyā al-Rāzī) made notable contributions to many areas of medicine. His manuscripts, carefully preserved down the centuries, were among the first medical books printed in Europe in the 15th century. After translation into Latin Rhazes’s writings became widely disseminated and were to influence the future direction of modern medicine.   Rhazes wrote the first known medical description of sma ..read more
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Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) : LSHTM Rare Books Blog series No. 2
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by lshps8
1y ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog Figure 1: Portrait of A.R. Wallace ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE (1823-1913) : British naturalist, humanist, geographer, social critic… and anti-vaccination activist(!) Alfred Russel Wallace was one of the founders of evolutionary biology. In 1858 he and Charles Darwin jointly proposed a theory for the process of evolution by natural selection before a meeting of eminent scientists at the Linnean Society of London.  It was the catalyst that Darwin needed to finish writing The Origin of Species published in 1859. Wallace, by profession a natural h ..read more
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Henry Vandyke Carter (1831-1897): LSHTM Rare Books blog series No. 1
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by lshps8
1y ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog HENRY VANDYKE CARTER (1831-1897) : author of On Leprosy and Elephantiasis,  and the artist for Gray’s Anatomy.  Gray’s Anatomy is a classic medical textbook, used by doctors, anatomists and medical artists.  Yet, despite Henry Gray’s (1826/27-1861) scholarly text running to 720 pages, it is unlikely the book would have retained its acclaimed position (it has been in print continuously since 1858), were it not for the brilliant 363 text-figures – one on every other page. Credit for the illustrations is due to the subject of this ..read more
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Work Experience in LSHTM Library and Archives
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by Aisling OMalley
1y ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog By Mia Annesen-Wood Firstly, I would just like to thank the whole LSHTM Library and Archives team for being so welcoming and friendly. It has been a wonderful experience to both observe and play a small role in the work they do here, I am so grateful for the amount of time you have given to me despite your busy schedules. On my first day I was greeted by David and Heather who gave me a tour and outlined my week. I then attended a focus group asking the LSHTM students their thoughts on the Library and how they use it. Later, I researched the me ..read more
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Turning old books into e-books: our rare books go digital
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by Jane Falconer
1y ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog The Internet Archive have started to publish high resolution scans of the School’s 19th century books and pamphlets on their site. The files can be downloaded and viewed in a variety of file types including PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Maybe you’d like to read the Report from the Select Committee on Habitual Drunkards (often an issue at this time of year), or if you’re leaving London over the holiday season you might want some travel health advice from James Lind’s Essay on Diseases Incidental to Europeans in Hot Climates. If you overindulge ove ..read more
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Wellcome to digitise the Library’s 19th Century literature
LAORS Blog » Rare Books
by Jane Falconer
1y ago
Library, Archive & Open Research Services blog The School Library has been selected to contribute to the UK Medical Heritage Library digitisation project, joint funded by the Wellcome Library and JISC. The project aims to create high quality digital scans of 19th century medical books and pamphlets which will be available for everyone to use under a creative commons license. The images will be available to view and download on the Wellcome Library website and the Open Archives website. The School will receive copies to mount on our own systems and provide links from the Library Catalogue ..read more
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