Rabbit vs IV
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Dale Gillies
2w ago
For small, fluffy, adorable creatures, rabbit care can actually be a huge challenge in the veterinary practice. They are seen to be more difficult and fragile than the standard cat or dog, and some of the veterinary team are unsure of the best protocol when handling and hospitalising. Rabbit anaesthetics and their recovery carry a much higher fatality risk, however, there are steps that can be followed to reduce this risk. This can be as simple as ensuring that a catheter is placed for all rabbit patients – day patients or hospitalised patients – and that their intravenous fluid therapy (IVFT ..read more
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VN Voice: OCD and the vet industry
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Nigel Woodbine
2w ago
Image @ chrupka / Adobe Stock Qualifying as a veterinary nurse was a long-awaited moment for myself and was a career that I had wanted for as long as I can remember. It is a job that I imagine everyone finds difficult for different reasons and at different points in their career. I expected to find certain aspects of my career hard, but little did I think it would be a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and learning to navigate everyday nursing life alongside it that I would find most difficult. In the early years of my career, OCD felt debilitating and lonely. The nature of our ..read more
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Induced vomiting from the nurse’s perspective
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Dale Gillies
3w ago
We’ve all been given that fun job once or twice. The one to get the gloves on and sift through some dog vomit for that pair of pants, the delightful smelling chocolate orange vomit, or for the white cylinder-shaped thing he “found in the park”. It’s the task that makes us love the job… As nurses, we try see the funny side of the cute dog with the scrunchie pinned back ears, or the more “exotic” objects eaten, but from the pet’s point of view, the situation is nothing to be mocked. Careful consideration When inducing vomiting there are some considerations to be adhered to. For instance, if the ..read more
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Materialism in practice
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Carly Kilby
1M ago
As a locum, there’s an element of impostor syndrome as you walk into a new practice. This practice is paying a higher rate for your services, you had better perform and make your rate worth it. You want them to want you back. You want the practice to say: “They’re expensive, but they’re worth it.” Right? My impostor syndrome has gone beyond that; I put myself through extra certificates and qualifications to try and validate myself and make my hourly rate seem worth it. However, now I have these extra letters after my name, I need to live up to the expensive standard the practice is expecting ..read more
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The ubiquity of Pilchards
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Jane Davidson
1M ago
Despite saying I’m a one-cat household with my hospice foster Moxie, we have recently been sharing our household with a new friend. Moxie may be a geriatric lady but this hasn’t stopped a large tom cat from following her through the cat flap. Billy as he is now known is a 6kg, big-cheeked hunk, but very shy. As he announced his arrival with a massive tom cat spray of pee over my sofa, I felt he should be rewarded with being neutered and found a nice home. Furry foundling Fast forward two weeks and thanks to the local Cat Protection scheme he has been chipped and neutered. He’s developing into ..read more
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VN Voice: OCD and the vet industry
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Nigel Woodbine
1M ago
Qualifying as a veterinary nurse was a long-awaited moment for myself and was a career that I had wanted for as long as I can remember. It is a job that I imagine everyone finds difficult for different reasons and at different points in their career. I expected to find certain aspects of my career hard, but little did I think it would be a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and learning to navigate everyday nursing life alongside it that I would find most difficult. In the early years of my career, OCD felt debilitating and lonely. The nature of our work only amplified the impact ..read more
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It was a good day
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Carly Kilby
2M ago
Don’t forget to reflect on the things that made you smile today. I still have little things I do at work today that I was shown 20 years ago; little habits that make my system easier – the use of muscle memory and routine, an order of which I do things because that’s the way I was taught. Some of these things have come in and out of fashion, and I have always stuck with the practice’s SOPs, but there are some things I do that I learned myself the hard way. Carly-isms For example, I’ve had one too many syringe/needle disconnections and drugs exploding where other people have handed it to me. As ..read more
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Put your hands where my eyes can see
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Carly Kilby
3M ago
Theatre practice. It’s a funny world, the world of asepsis and sterility. To an alien, the rituals we go through to prevent infection – our repetitive, obsessive attitude towards touching certain things after a period of cleansing – must seem very bizarre. And this weird ritual continues once we enter theatre: Don’t touch anything unless it’s blue or shiny and on the instrument trolley. Don’t scratch your head. Don’t blow your nose. Don’t speak too much. Don’t move around. The rules are endless, and all you want to do out of that list is scratch the itch that immediately occurs once you’ve ..read more
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The world is yours
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Carly Kilby
3M ago
There’s a constant pressure in the industry to do something else. Whether that pressure comes from us wanting to branch out and experience different practices, different countries, different disciplines, or whether its pressure from society for you to change it up a bit. It’s almost like you can’t possibly be happy in the same job, with the same role for 5, 6, 10 years – that’s repetitive and boring, isn’t it? The same people. The same rota. But, what’s wrong with that? You know where things are, you know how the practice works, you know the clients, you know the computer system, it’s familia ..read more
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My journey in the profession – am I the oldest VN in England?
Vet Times Blog » VN Blogs
by Nigel Woodbine
3M ago
I began my career in veterinary medicine as a “veterinary assistant” in California during the 1980s. I had no training initially, but after I began working with animals, I did a grooming course and enrolled on an animal science course at an agricultural college. At that time, there were few qualified veterinary technicians. Our jobs included manual restraint for all x-rays (yes, you read that correctly), lab tests, monitoring anaesthetics and general nursing care. One task that stands out in my memory is the morning faecal samples. There would be a nice little pile at the front door in the mor ..read more
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